Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMoney Supply
IN THE NEWS

Money Supply

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Tom Herman and Tom Herman,The Wall Street Journal Reprinted by permission of The Wall Street Journal 1990 Dow Jones & Co. Inc. All rights reserved | February 10, 1991
After years in oblivion, the Federal Reserve's money-suppl figures are gaining new respect.Bond traders who used to yawn at the weekly money report suddenly have begun monitoring their news wires closely Thursday afternoons -- precisely at 4:30 p.m. EST -- when money-supply numbers are released by the Fed. They say the money statistics may provide valuable clues to where the economy, Fed policy and interest rates are heading.At a House Budget Committee hearing Jan. 22, Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan said money supply "in this particular environment will give us reasonably good signals relevant to how the economy is emerging."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Peter Morici | December 13, 2012
Bar the door, Nelly - the Fed has abandoned all restraint and will now print money to finance the federal deficit. To support the weak recovery, the Federal Reserve continues to keep short-term interest rates near zero, purchase mortgage-backed securities and push down long-term interest rates. To accomplish the latter, since September 2011, the Fed has sold Treasury bills with terms of less than three years to purchase bonds with longer maturities. Now, with its supply of short-term securities running out, the Fed will simply print new money to buy U.S. government debt - at a pace of $45 billion a month.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Newsday | July 12, 1992
When the Federal Reserve cut interest rates July 1 it said it was not just responding to the big jump in unemployment. Instead, No. 1 on its worry list was the anemic growth of the nation's money supply, one of dozens of technical tea leaves studied by economists.Slow money growth proved a pretty good predictor of bad things to come in the economy when it slowed last year. Its recent drops have experts worrying again that the economy is headed for a downturn."If it continues to decline at the same rate, I expect the Fed will act again [to lower interest rates]
NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Jonathan Peterson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Milton Friedman, a brilliant champion of free-market economics and individual freedom who almost single-handedly altered the boundaries of public debate on an array of national issues, died yesterday in San Francisco. He was 94. The cause was heart failure, said Robert Fanger, a spokesman for the Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation in Indianapolis. Mr. Friedman was considered a leading economic thinker of the 20th century. His many prescriptions for policy, notably on managing the nation's money supply and curbing the welfare state, influenced presidents and presidential candidates starting in the 1960s.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Reserve said yesterday that the main yardstick it used in guiding the economy's growth for more than 15 years has become so unreliable that it would largely abandon it.Chairman Alan Greenspan said the Federal Reserve would stop relying on growth in the money supply -- its traditional tool -- and begin relying on interest rates, an approach more akin to the way it worked before it started relying on the money-supply figures.In...
NEWS
By The New York Times | December 21, 1990
CRITICS HAVE accused the Federal Reserve Board of rigidly pursuing an anti-inflationary policy even as the economy was sinking into recession. Tuesday, the board signaled a welcome change. It cut the discount rate -- the interest rate banks pay when they borrow money directly from the central bank -- by one-half percentage point, which paves the way for lower interest rates across the board. That will give a desperately needed boost to spending and help revive a sluggish economy.November figures on output and prices convinced the Fed it was time to shift gears.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1991
The Baltimore area economy continued to slow in the 1990 fourth quarter, according to a study issued by Grant Thornton, a national accounting and management consulting firm with a local office.The Grant Thornton Index, consisting of seven equally weighted economic indicators, fell 0.65 points in Baltimore in the last three months of the year, hitting 108.7. This marked the fourth quarterly decline in the index for Baltimore since the end of 1989, when the index was at 110.5.The drop of 0.65 points was sharper than the drop of 0.23 in the third quarter.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | October 24, 1992
NEW YORK -- Stocks closed marginally higher yesterday as the economic picture brightened somewhat.The Dow Jones industrial average rose 6.76, to 3,207.64, after seesawing 10 points in either direction. The Standard & Poor's 500 fell 0.80, to 414.10. The NASDAQ Composite Index inched up 0.21, to 597.33.Advancers outpaced decliners by nearly 8-to-6 among stocks on the New York Stock Exchange. Trading, though brisk, was the lightest this week, with about 199 million shares changing hands on the Big Board.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1993
Southland founder's son resignsJoe C. Thompson, a member of the family that started Southland Corp., resigned from its board of directors, the company said yesterday. Mr. Thompson, 52, is the chairman of Sigel Liquor Stores and will pursue other business interests. His brothers Jere and John, who formerly led Southland, remain on its board.The Thompsons lost controlling interest in Southland, which owns 7-Eleven stores, when it went through a Chapter 11 bankruptcy restructuring in 1990. Their father started the company with a single Dallas store in 1927.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 17, 2002
IN OCTOBER 1979 stock and bond markets went berserk because the government said the size of the money supply was $3 billion more than it really was. The error was soon corrected, but an alleged $3 billion bump in the country's supply of cash, checking balances and whatnot shocked Wall Street because money-supply growth was thought to generate the severe inflation afflicting the economy at the time. In these days of monetary laxity, $3 billion is a trifling rounding error, loose change on the national night table.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 29, 2006
This year marks the dollar's 35th anniversary as a paper-only currency, freed from gold, launched into the blue and steered through the clouds by government bureaucrats. For most of those 35 years, the bureaucrat-in-chief has been Alan Greenspan, who swore by the gold standard and then did as much as anybody to bury it. The Federal Reserve chief, who retires this week, seemed to manage the paper money supply so brilliantly that the country had only two short recessions under his watch and doubled the size of its econo- my. But it's too early to declare him a genius and way too early to pronounce today's monetary setup a permanent success.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2005
Hundreds of city schoolteachers are slightly richer -- though not in the traditional sense -- as a result of an e-mail campaign that raises money to buy classroom supplies. Laden with plastic bags heavy with reams of paper, pencils, crayons, scissors and other items, city workers visited 20 randomly chosen schools last week to brighten the days of more than 450 teachers. "It was a good gesture," said Chris Lowder, who teaches art at Dr. Carter G. Woodson Elementary/Middle School. The Cherry Hill school was visited by local dignitaries Jan. 25, and dozens of teachers were summoned onto the auditorium stage to receive their bags of supplies, to the resounding cheers of their pupils.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | January 25, 2004
AS STOCK prices continued their low-key ascent in January, you've probably missed a seething drama on Wall Street. Stock market investors are pleased with success. In the bond market, it's another story. Beginning last fall, most analysts bet that interest rates would rise in 2004, eroding the value of bonds and other fixed-income investments. That forecast will come true someday. But January has witnessed a surprise rally in bonds. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note fell below 4 percent last week for the first time since early October.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 17, 2002
IN OCTOBER 1979 stock and bond markets went berserk because the government said the size of the money supply was $3 billion more than it really was. The error was soon corrected, but an alleged $3 billion bump in the country's supply of cash, checking balances and whatnot shocked Wall Street because money-supply growth was thought to generate the severe inflation afflicting the economy at the time. In these days of monetary laxity, $3 billion is a trifling rounding error, loose change on the national night table.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2000
Pushing an array of initiatives and pledging to put more teachers and textbooks in the classroom, Superintendent William H. Hyde proposed yesterday a $15 million increase in spending next fiscal year -- if approved, the biggest jump since 1991. Hyde's proposed 2000- 2001 operating budget, presented to the school board during its monthly meeting, calls for $184.6 million in funding for the fiscal year that begins July 1. It reflects an 8.9 percent increase -- about $15 million -- from this year's $169.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford | October 3, 1999
THE FEDERAL Reserve's Federal Open Market committee meets Tuesday to decide whether to boost interest rates for a third time this year. Last week a group of private and academic economists who call themselves the Shadow Open Market Committee, pointing to growth in the money supply, urged the Fed to raise rates further to head off inflation. But also last week, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco President Robert Parry said the central bank should be "more cautious" about raising interest rates because of the uncertainty of economic forecasts.
NEWS
By Steve H. Hanke | August 11, 1992
IN ONE of Washington's long-running charades, the supposedly independent Federal Reserve is always cast as the chaste virgin, untouched by fawning politicos.In reality it is as pure as the driven slush.In hopes of igniting the economy the Fed, under White House and congressional prodding, has pushed the discount rate -- the interest rate the Fed charges commercial banks for short-term loans -- to a 29-year low.This raises embarrassing questions about Fed independence. Has it again become a victim of political indiscretion, operating as a branch of a president's re-election campaign?
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1996
An index of future economic activity rose to a record high in June, but analysts dismissed the report yesterday as stale news that already has been eclipsed by subsequent developments.The Conference Board said that its Index of Leading Economic Indicators rose 0.5 point in June to 102.9, the highest ever under the index's current formula, which is changed periodically. That follows a rise of 0.2 point in May and 0.3 in April.The index is designed to forecast economic action six to nine months in advance.
NEWS
January 23, 1997
Days End Farm Horse Rescue is seeking donations of cash, food and supplies for winter horse care.The Lisbon farm takes in neglected and unwanted horses and nurses them back to health. The horses are then put up for adoption by families.Kathleen Schwartz, Days End Farm founder, said she depends on donations of money, feed, blankets, medical supplies and other necessities to help care for the horses.Anyone who wishes to help can call (410) 442-1564 or send donations to Days End Farm Horse Rescue, Box 309, Lisbon 21765.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1996
An index of future economic activity rose to a record high in June, but analysts dismissed the report yesterday as stale news that already has been eclipsed by subsequent developments.The Conference Board said that its Index of Leading Economic Indicators rose 0.5 point in June to 102.9, the highest ever under the index's current formula, which is changed periodically. That follows a rise of 0.2 point in May and 0.3 in April.The index is designed to forecast economic action six to nine months in advance.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.