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Money Laundering

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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
An Odenton man pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to laundering money in a scheme involving stolen waste vegetable oil. Anthony Jean-Claude, 40, admitted in a plea agreement that he operated a scheme involving waste vegetable oil, which can be recycled into biodiesel fuel or as an additive for animal feed. According to Jean-Claude's plea agreement filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, he started in 2010 by teaming up with a partner to steal waste oil from restaurants in Maryland, Virginia and Washington using a flatbed truck and a mechanical pump.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
The founder of a Baltimore County-based company that provided insurance to nightclubs and bars who was previously charged with misleading regulators now faces additional charges. The new charges of wire fraud and money laundering mean Jeffrey Cohen, the former CEO of Indemnity Insurance Corp., could face a stiffer sentence if convicted. Officials said he could be sentenced to an additional 120 years imprisonment if convicted on all counts. He was previously facing 15 years in prison for each of five counts of making false statements to an insurance regulator.
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1996
Leonard Bramson, who along with his father and brother devised a nationwide insurance fraud scheme that bilked at least $10 million from doctors, had his nine-year prison sentence reduced by 11 months Friday.Prosecutors in U.S. District Court in Baltimore were tight-lipped about the details, saying only that Mr. Bramson had provided information on "an unspecified case" in New Jersey and therefore earned the sentence reduction. The file was sealed.The development is but another mysterious chapter to the Bramson story.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Authorities say a Montgomery County man defrauded several senior citizens of thousands of dollars using online dating sites. Krist Koranteng, 32, of Burtonsville and Laurel was indicted Thursday by a federal grand jury on charges of conspiracy, mail fraud, wire fraud and money laundering. From 2012 to February, authorities said Koranteng and others convinced the elderly victims that they were romantically interested in them online and through phone and text messages, and persuaded them to send money to them.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
Money launderer Philip Manglitz will remain free until his September sentencing but must wear an electronic monitoring device and report to a probation officer once a week, a federal judge ruled yesterday.U.S. District Judge Herbert Maletz laid out the restrictions during a hearing in federal court in Baltimore yesterday. He also increased the Glenwood developer's bond to $1.3 million.Federal prosecutors -- concerned that Manglitz might flee before his sentencing -- had wanted to revoke the Glenwood developer's bond, sending him into custody.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | April 25, 1992
Leonard A. Bramson launched his career in crime while he was a law student and went on to help carry out an elaborate family scheme that used bogus insurance companies to defraud customers of millions of dollars."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
A Baltimore County man who operated a sports information service has been sentenced to 2 1/2 years in federal prison after being convicted of wire fraud and money laundering in defrauding his clients.U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis also ordered Marc Neal Robert Berman, 36, of the 8500 block of Arborwood Road in Stevenson to pay $100,000 in restitution and forfeit property in Randallstown and $189,000 at Friday's sentencing hearing.Berman pleaded guilty in November to using interstate wire transfers to commit a scheme to defraud, and laundering the proceeds, the U.S. attorney's office said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 1996
Business was so brisk at S&F Check Cashers, a modest check-cashing concern in West New York, N.J., across the Hudson River from Manhattan, that the dollars it collected were reportedly sometimes hauled to the bank by an armored-car company.But as Marion Percell, an assistant U.S. attorney in Newark, observed, "A check-cashing service should be getting money from the bank, not sending it in."The service was part of what law enforcement officials here say was a larger conspiracy that sent as much as $60 million in drug profits back to the Cali cartel in Colombia under the cover of such mundane services as selling telephone debit cards and money orders, renting beepers and cashing checks.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 25, 2000
GENEVA A group of major international banks, stung by the growing reputation of the banking industry as a haven for ill-gotten gains, are pledging to form a global front against money laundering. They plan to issue guidelines to toughen their practices to shut off dirty-money deposits by organized crime and corrupt political leaders. Details will not be released until next week, but a significant provision in the new code of conduct will require banks to bring the activities of offshore banking subsidiaries in line with tougher rules on financial crime.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2010
The "ringleader" in a scheme to sell stolen goods through Baltimore pawn shops and online auction sites pleaded guilty Monday to laundering $20 million in ill-gotten gains, the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office announced. Jerome Ira Stal, 41, is the 11 t h person to take a plea deal in the three-year conspiracy. He faces a maximum of 10 years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for March 18. Stal and 14 other men were indicted this spring on conspiracy charges alleging that "boosters" shoplifted various items -- including beauty products, medication, DVDs and tools – from Target, Safeway, Wal-Mart and other stores, then sold the goods to pawn shops.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
From a home base in Houston, federal authorities say, a Remington native has been directing a cross-country drug operation that shipped large quantities of heroin to Baltimore, New York, New Orleans and elsewhere. Fred Douglas Brooks III, 46, had already served two federal prison terms for drug trafficking when he allegedly launched a new venture despite having betrayed a crew of Mexican suppliers by testifying against them in 2005. The latest business - a "high-level, interstate narcotics-trafficking and money-laundering operation," according to federal prosecutors in Louisiana - flourished until his arrest June 30 in Houston, authorities say. At least 16 people, including Brooks, have been charged in connection with the case; seven are charged in U.S. District Court in Maryland.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
An Odenton man pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to laundering money in a scheme involving stolen waste vegetable oil. Anthony Jean-Claude, 40, admitted in a plea agreement that he operated a scheme involving waste vegetable oil, which can be recycled into biodiesel fuel or as an additive for animal feed. According to Jean-Claude's plea agreement filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, he started in 2010 by teaming up with a partner to steal waste oil from restaurants in Maryland, Virginia and Washington using a flatbed truck and a mechanical pump.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Inside a drab computer lab at the Johns Hopkins University, a team of researchers is trying to build something that has never existed before: a digital currency that changes hands completely in secret. Its name is Zerocoin. The untraceable currency is designed to compete with other virtual moneys such as Bitcoin, which are drawing attention as alternatives for businesses and individuals — and drawing criticism from some who believe they enable money laundering and other criminal activity.
NEWS
By E.J. Fagan | November 25, 2013
U.S. law enforcement officials have been shutting down giant illegal marketplaces that do business in "bitcoin" and are beginning to lay out plans to regulate such digital currencies - like we do any other kind of money - by requiring that money laundering controls be applied to the transactions. The virtual bitcoin currency is not backed by any central bank or government and can be transferred "peer to peer" between any two people anywhere. It is created through a complex computer mining process that allows people to earn new bitcoins by solving certain mathematical problems.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The head teller at a Perry Hall bank and the reputed leader of a drug trafficking organization pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to a money laundering conspiracy, court records show. According to a copy of their plea agreements, Deanna Bailey was a member of a drug ring that moved at least 500 pounds of marijuana from the "southwestern United States to Maryland for the purpose of distributing it for profit once it arrived. " The government alleges Bailey was head of the organization - she says she was only a member, records show.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Washington Post | May 8, 2013
A Washington, D.C., police officer was charged Tuesday with money laundering in connection with an alleged drug-trafficking scheme in the Pittsburgh and Baltimore areas. Federal authorities say more than $2 million in proceeds from cocaine was hidden. Officer Jared K. Weinberg, 28, was taken into custody Monday at the 4th District police station, according to a department spokeswoman. The charges in a complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Pittsburgh allege a broad conspiracy that includes meetings in which prosecutors say large amounts of cash were exchanged at apartment buildings in Howard County and at the Mall in Columbia.
NEWS
By Bartlett Naylor | March 25, 2013
When criminal prosecutors at the U.S. Department of Justice found that giant bank HSBC - whose American operation is chartered in Maryland - had violated money-laundering laws covering $200 trillion in transactions, and with customers including terrorists, sanctioned states and Mexican drug lords, one might reasonably have expected a criminal prosecution. After all, other, much smaller money launderers are currently serving prison sentences. However, the DOJ chose instead to fine HSBC roughly 12 percent of last year's profits.
NEWS
By Walter Olson | May 29, 2012
Laws are like fine nets, catching the common fish even as the biggest push their way through. Or so you might think on learning of how federal prosecutors keep nabbing small and medium-size businesspeople who violate an obscure law relating to bank paperwork, even as the best-known violator of the law so far (a certain well-connected politico named Eliot Spitzer) walks free. Last month, the feds swooped down on a successful Maryland dairy business, South Mountain Creamery, seizing $70,000 in its bank accounts and formally charging its owners, Randy and Karen Sowers, with the offense of bank "structuring.
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