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NEWS
March 9, 2012
After reading Kathleen Hetherington's letter ("Pension shift would hurt community colleges," March 6), I can offer a few suggestions. What about getting involved with the exorbitant cost of textbooks as a result of collusion between the schools and the publishing industry. Schools might ensure that the same text isn't just rearranged and considered a new book, and whether required books are even going to be used in the actual classes. If the publisher won't lower the prices, maybe college could put it out for bid outside of the "good 'ol boy network.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 9, 2014
In addition to Max Obuszewski's prescient observation of what has become President Barack Obama's war, this perpetual war with no borders has gotten the support of much of the media and Congress ( "Has President Obama undergone a chance of heart?" Oct. 3). What began as a promise by President Obama not to engage in conflict with U.S. advisers has evolved to a debate over "boots on the ground," or, in other words, active combat. How many will be maimed and killed during this mission?
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NEWS
October 25, 2012
Your article on the final presidential debate included a paragraph stating that "with backing from casino billionaire Sheldon Adelson, the Republican Jewish Coalition is airing anti-Obama TV ads in South Florida, where most of the state's Jewish voters reside. " ("Final debate 'particularly big,'" Oct. 22). This is the same billionaire casino owner who suggested he would consider spending as much as $100 million of his personal fortune on the 2012 elections in order to defeat President Obama.
NEWS
October 5, 2014
I hail reporter Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun for your investigative report on Baltimore police officers' excessive use of force and the astronomical financial and psychological costs of this to our city ( "Undue Force: Suits against police cost millions," Sept. 28). Baltimore City has mishandled, lost, and poorly accounted for millions of taxpayer dollars in recent years. At the same time, city officials regularly claim the need for new taxes, bonds and other revenue sources to pay for badly needed upgrades to city schools and recreation centers; each spring the city claims that it has insufficient funds to operate all of the park and neighborhood swimming pools daily over the summer, and neighborhoods such as West Baltimore continue to struggle with blight and joblessness.
NEWS
August 20, 2010
Over and over again, we see that elections are ultimately not really about the issues or leadership qualities. They're about money. Whoever has the most money bribes, er, wins over the voters ("Ehrlich leads in donors; O'Malley leads in cash" and "Bernstein outpaces Jessamy in funds," Aug. 19). I suspect our nation's Founding Fathers are spinning in their graves. Mary Shaw, Philadelphia, PA
NEWS
June 29, 2011
I was born in Pimlico 75 years ago, when the neighborhood was a beautiful, friendly, caring place to live. But as I look at it now I want to cry. Money will help Pimlico, but it needs a lot more than $2 million from slots proceeds. It needs people who care about their community. Mayor after mayor has done nothing there. I hope the money will help to turn Pimlico around, but somehow I doubt that it will. A long-time Pimlico lover
NEWS
June 25, 2011
I am sure there are a lot of benefits to African AIDS programs that are supported by U.S. taxpayer dollars. But wouldn't it be better, at least for the present, to send those dollars to Baltimore or Detroit or Los Angeles? Better yet, let the poor working slobs who are the source of that money keep it and spend it however they choose. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson
NEWS
February 16, 2012
Thank you Marta Mossburg for having the courage to state the obvious ("A failure of values, not economics," Feb. 15). The idea that values are a significant factor in personal achievement has been sneered at by the left for over 30 years. As Ms. Mossburg points out, the facts clearly show otherwise. Unfortunately, I don't believe the current administration in Annapolis is capable of addressing the real problems in the achievement gap. That would be too difficult. It's so much easier to throw money at the problem (other people's money, I might add)
NEWS
April 25, 2011
Battlefield preservation, since it is a part of our history, means nothing, absolutely nothing, to developers of cram-em-in houses and shopping centers ("Modern life assaults Md. Civil War battlefields," April 25). It's all part of the dumbing down and greed prevalent in the USA today. I await the development of Valley Forge with cookie cutter cabins erected by Shamble Brothers. F. Cordell, Lutherville
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | July 11, 2011
At least I'm not the only one! Eileen described in her Sunday column about unclaimed property databases how a family acquaintance had spotted her husband's name on an Indiana attorney general website, reminding them to collect more than $1,200 in a long-forgotten bank account. Have any of you ever tipped off a friend or relative that they had some money coming to them? I've periodically checked my own name in the search engine on missingmoney.com with no hits, but in March I must have been bored, because I also ran my parents and sister through the system.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 1, 2014
I was in Seattle recently to congratulate union and community organizers who helped that city enact the first $15-per-hour minimum wage in the country. Other cities and states should followSeattle's example. Contrary to the dire predictions of opponents, the hike won't cost Seattle jobs. In fact, it will put more money into the hands of low-wage workers who are likely to spend almost all of it in the vicinity. That will create jobs. Conservatives believe the economy functions better if the rich have more money and everyone else has less.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | September 30, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Subbing for new grandmother Hillary Clinton on late notice, former President Bill Clinton became the star attraction Tuesday night at a fundraiser for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Anthony G. Brown at a posh estate in Potomac. The Brown campaign said the former president helped Brown draw about 450 guests and raise more than $1.2 million for his campaign against Republican Larry Hogan in the Nov. 4 election. Hillary Clinton, the presumed Democratic front-runner for the 2016 presidential nomination, had been the expected headliner at the big-ticket event at an estate in one of Maryland's wealthiest communities.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
The answer to Dan Rodricks ' question as to whether the Ravens' "generous" donation to the House of Ruth will mute criticism of the Raven's and the NFL's ham-handed and cynical handling of the Ray Rice fiasco is, of course it will ("Looking for silver lining in the ugliness of the Rice case," Sept. 27). That's what it is intended for. Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and their respective coverup crews are so incredibly hypocritical. Throwing money at it has seldom been an effective solution to a societal problem, particularly one as serious and pervasive as intimate partner violence.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Maryland has won a five-year, $650 million federal grant that will give officials more flexibility to run the state's foster care program and reduce the number of children entering the system, Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration said Tuesday. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services grant, which has been awarded to about 20 states so far, will allow Maryland to expand programs that help struggling families to avoid having their children turned over to foster care, state officials said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A federal judge ruled this week that owners of multiple Harford County properties - where portions of a 21-mile underground gas pipeline are being installed under an eminent domain claim - cannot fully access funds set aside by the gas company as a form of collateral until a final determination is made at trial on compensation. Columbia Gas Transmission LLC was granted access to the properties in June to begin installing a back-up gas line between Owings Mills and Fallston under condition that it file a cash bond payment of $231,675 to the court, according to court records.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
The founder of a Baltimore County-based company that provided insurance to nightclubs and bars who was previously charged with misleading regulators now faces additional charges. The new charges of wire fraud and money laundering mean Jeffrey Cohen, the former CEO of Indemnity Insurance Corp., could face a stiffer sentence if convicted. Officials said he could be sentenced to an additional 120 years imprisonment if convicted on all counts. He was previously facing 15 years in prison for each of five counts of making false statements to an insurance regulator.
NEWS
March 15, 2012
Maybe instead of blustering about the need to increase the state's tax on a gallon of gas, The Sun's editorial board should support legislation to outlaw an increase in the tax until all of the money that was stolen from the Transportation Trust Fund since 1992 is returned ("Pay now or later," March 14). It would also be helpful to know exactly how much has been taken from the fund since the last time the tax was increased, and who was the governor at the time that authorized it. The title of the editorial is somewhat ironic, as I feel that I have already "paid now," it's just that those funds weren't spent for the purpose they were collected.
NEWS
September 29, 2010
The millions that politicians are spending for campaign ads is not only annoying to TV audiences but also a disgraceful waste of money that could be used to feed homeless, fix the Maryland budget shortfall, or last but not least, fund medical research into cures for cancer or some other disease. Most of these ads do not even pertain to me. I can't vote for Andy Harris or Frank Kratovil, and I don't live in Anne Arundel County, so I can't vote for or against Question A (slots at the mall)
HEALTH
September 12, 2014
Federal health officials have awarded $3.5 million in Affordable Care Act funds to 14 community health centers in Maryland. The money will go to hire 60 new workers, expand hours and increase access to primary care. The money will also go to expand services to include dental care, mental health services, prescription drug coverage and vision services. The money is expected to provide care to more than 20,000 new patients around the state. See the list of centers receiving grants here . Around the nation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded $295 million to 1,195 centers with ore than 9,000 sites.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The fall fundraising party season revs into high gear next weekend with a plethora of big shindigs that can cost big bucks to attend - all for a worthy cause, of course. From the Night of 100 Elvises to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Gala, tickets can go from $26 to $5,000 each. With such a broad range, you might wonder what goes into setting the price. Why does one hoopla cost so little, and another so much? Certainly, there are expenses to cover. A fancy gala that offers hors d'oeuvres, open bar, a gourmet sit-down dinner and live dance music is going to cost the organizers a lot more than a party that might have local restaurants and liquor distributors donating their wares at food stations, with a cash bar. But, there are a few more factors that go into the mix. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Maryland Chapter is one of the busiest nonprofits, with seven major parties a year, says Ann Krulevitz, the chapter's associate executive director.
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