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Mona Lisa

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NEWS
June 9, 1991
"Perhaps the greatest songwriter of the century," says the Penguin Encyclopedia of Popular Music. That's high praise in the century in which a dozen or so great American songwriters redefined the musical comedy form and raised it to the level of enduring art. But Cole Porter, who would have been 100 today, was certainly right up there at the top. After seeing "Can-Can," Irving Berlin wrote him, "anything I can do you can do better."That was in 1953, and the young lovers who were humming and singing "I Love Paris" and "It's All Right With Me" then were the children or grandchildren of the lovers who hummed and sung "Let's Do It, Let's Fall in Love" 25 years before.
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NEWS
January 10, 2010
DVD 'The Hurt Locker': Most Iraq war movies elicit a shrug from audiences. But this look at an Army bomb squad isn't most Iraq movies. Right from the first scene, director Kathryn Bigelow draws you in with brutal realism and sets off a tension that lasts through the credits. She knows how to defuse what made those other films bombs: the politics and the moralizing. In stores Tuesday. THEATER 'Young Frankenstein': It's alive! Well, sorta. Mel Brooks' oft-panned Broadway show comes to Baltimore with most of the original cast (including Roger Bart of "Desperate Housewives" fame)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 14, 2004
Leonardo Da Vinci's Mona Lisa is one of the most famous paintings in the history of art and a jewel of the collection at the Louvre Museum in Paris. So what's it doing in Baltimore? That's the question visitors to the Walters Art Museum have been asking this month as they enter the museum's Renaissance and Baroque galleries and spot the famous lady smiling down at them. Actually, as a wall label notes, it's not the "real" Mona Lisa. Instead, it is a copy -- albeit a very good one -- painted by an unknown French artist probably sometime in the 16th or 17th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
Painter. Scientist. Inventor. Designer. Engineer. Visionary. Genius. Has there ever been a man with more labels attached to his name than Leonardo da Vinci? Probably not. In a world where mere mortals struggle to master just one profession, da Vinci seemed to master them all. He painted "The Mona Lisa" more than 500 years ago, and it's still probably the most famous painting in the world. He was a key developer of the camera obscura, an early projection device whose descendants include the still camera.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 25, 2004
Some like their Italian restaurants warm and cozy. Some prefer chic and avant garde. But if you enjoy Italian restaurants in the baroque style, I've got one for you: La Mona Lisa Ristorante Italiano in Annapolis. You know the kind of place I mean. The kind that has cherubs in ornate gold frames hanging on the walls, and profiteroles slathered in hot fudge sauce for dessert. The black-tied maitre d', who treats you like his new best friend, is so ingratiating you almost wish you were. Italian restaurants in the baroque style have lots of pleasures and not much attitude.
FEATURES
By Sandra Blakeslee and Sandra Blakeslee,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 27, 2000
For nearly 500 years, people have been gazing at Leonardo da Vinci's portrait of the Mona Lisa with a sense of bafflement. First she is smiling. Then the smile fades. A moment later the smile returns only to disappear again. What is with this lady's face? How did the great painter capture such a mysterious expression, and why haven't other artists copied it? The Italians have a word to explain Mona Lisa's smile: Sfumato. It means blurry, ambiguous and up to the imagination. But now, according to Dr. Margaret Livingstone, a Harvard neuroscientist, there is another, more concrete explanation.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
In Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting, Mona Lisa gazes off into the distance, smiling faintly and, some say, mysteriously. But on the walls of a West Annapolis art supply store, Mona Lisa stands behind prison bars, sports a nose ring and hawks everything from eclairs to sushi. She grimaces, smokes a cigarette and grins to reveal a mouthful of oversized teeth. For two decades, customers and staff have brought renderings of that image to Art Things on Annapolis Street. More than 500 versions of her face decorate the walls and windows of the shop.
FEATURES
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 6, 1997
It's a portrait of genius.In 15,000 square feet of paintings, drawings, artifacts, working models of extraordinary inventions, theatrical presentations and interactive displays, the Boston Museum of Science is presenting in its only American venue nothing less than the life and work of perhaps the greatest genius of Western civilization: Leonardo da Vinci, the original Renaissance Man.Somehow, 15,000 square feet doesn't seem sufficient.Called "Leonardo da Vinci: Scientist, Inventor, Artist," the show could just as logically have its title reversed.
BUSINESS
By Mary Medland and Mary Medland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2000
The first hint that Jenny Campbell and Ron Ecker's home is not your ordinary Carroll County Cape Cod lies in the screen door that leads to the kitchen. Painted by Campbell, it's a knockoff of Leonardo Da Vinci's Mona Lisa. But that's not all. The other window screens reflect the work of Peter Max, Salvador Dali, James McNeil Whistler, and Andrew Wyeth. And then, there are the couple of dozen pink flamingos in the back yard. "But, we didn't want our neighbors to think we were too weird, so Ron and I put in a white picket fence to reassure them," said Campbell, who along with her husband shares the house with five cats and a dog. Clearly this is a home of artistic souls, a residence with the kind of creative karma that one would expect to find in Hampden, Fells Point, or perhaps Waverly.
FEATURES
December 12, 2005
Dec. 12--1913: Authorities in Florence, Italy, announced that the Mona Lisa, stolen from the Louvre Museum in Paris in 1911, had been recovered.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 20, 2009
Nothing is as it seems" in the Julia Roberts-Clive Owen corporate-espionage comedy-drama Duplicity. Take that as a blanket spoiler-alert. The strategy of the movie is to keep viewers alternately engaged and bemused, knowing they'll be tricked while feeling pleasurably gamed. Whipping audiences through multiple intrigues across the globe, Duplicity is like Mr. and Mrs. Smith with an intricate, real story and juicy cloak and dagger instead of hyperbolic gunplay. It's an odd duck: a labor-intensive piece of light entertainment.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
In Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting, Mona Lisa gazes off into the distance, smiling faintly and, some say, mysteriously. But on the walls of a West Annapolis art supply store, Mona Lisa stands behind prison bars, sports a nose ring and hawks everything from eclairs to sushi. She grimaces, smokes a cigarette and grins to reveal a mouthful of oversized teeth. For two decades, customers and staff have brought renderings of that image to Art Things on Annapolis Street. More than 500 versions of her face decorate the walls and windows of the shop.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
In Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting, Mona Lisa gazes off into the distance, smiling faintly and, some say, mysteriously. But on the walls of a West Annapolis art supply store, Mona Lisa stands behind prison bars, sports a nose ring and hawks everything from eclairs to sushi. She grimaces, smokes a cigarette and grins to reveal a mouthful of oversized teeth. For two decades, customers and staff have brought renderings of that image to Art Things on Annapolis Street. More than 500 versions of her face decorate the walls and windows of the shop.
FEATURES
December 12, 2005
Dec. 12--1913: Authorities in Florence, Italy, announced that the Mona Lisa, stolen from the Louvre Museum in Paris in 1911, had been recovered.
NEWS
April 30, 2004
Westminster High art students plan auction of creations The Westminster High School National Art Honor Society will hold a silent auction of student works from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow at the Westminster library branch. The library is at 50 E. Main St. Information: 410-751-3630. McDaniel film series ends with `Bush Mama' McDaniel College's 2003-2004 Film and Discussion Series will conclude with Bush Mama at 7 p.m. Monday in Room 108 of Hill Hall. Bush Mama is a drama about a black woman who is living on welfare in a Los Angeles ghetto and trying to raise her daughter alone after her partner is imprisoned for a crime he didn't commit.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 25, 2004
Some like their Italian restaurants warm and cozy. Some prefer chic and avant garde. But if you enjoy Italian restaurants in the baroque style, I've got one for you: La Mona Lisa Ristorante Italiano in Annapolis. You know the kind of place I mean. The kind that has cherubs in ornate gold frames hanging on the walls, and profiteroles slathered in hot fudge sauce for dessert. The black-tied maitre d', who treats you like his new best friend, is so ingratiating you almost wish you were. Italian restaurants in the baroque style have lots of pleasures and not much attitude.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
In Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting, Mona Lisa gazes off into the distance, smiling faintly and, some say, mysteriously. But on the walls of a West Annapolis art supply store, Mona Lisa stands behind prison bars, sports a nose ring and hawks everything from eclairs to sushi. She grimaces, smokes a cigarette and grins to reveal a mouthful of oversized teeth. For two decades, customers and staff have brought renderings of that image to Art Things on Annapolis Street. More than 500 versions of her face decorate the walls and windows of the shop.
FEATURES
September 22, 1998
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/Which year did Da Vinci paint the Mona Lisa?What is the September "Bug of the Month" at Insecta?She Never Lost Her SmileThe "Mona Lisa" is nearly 500 years old, but her charming smile continues to captivate art audiences worldwide. What's the deal behind that timeless smile, anyhow? Thanks to the students of Bronx High School and their partners in Borlange, Sweden, "Why is Mona Lisa Smiling?" has been developed to give art enthusiasts a better understanding of the history behind the painting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 14, 2004
Leonardo Da Vinci's Mona Lisa is one of the most famous paintings in the history of art and a jewel of the collection at the Louvre Museum in Paris. So what's it doing in Baltimore? That's the question visitors to the Walters Art Museum have been asking this month as they enter the museum's Renaissance and Baroque galleries and spot the famous lady smiling down at them. Actually, as a wall label notes, it's not the "real" Mona Lisa. Instead, it is a copy -- albeit a very good one -- painted by an unknown French artist probably sometime in the 16th or 17th century.
NEWS
By Pamela Sitt and Pamela Sitt,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 18, 2004
The chick flick of the moment, Julia Roberts' Mona Lisa Smile, is resplendent with details befitting a proper lady: red lips, pearls, gloves and a sleek silhouette. In this case, the lady is a 1950s Wellesley Girl -- but one need only look to fashion runways, contemporary magazines and well-heeled city streets to realize that a modern-day version of the Wellesley Girl has marched into mainstream fashion. We asked Mona Lisa Smile costume designer Michael Dennison, the man who dressed a cast including Julia Stiles, Kirsten Dunst and Maggie Gyllenhaal, about how to bring 1950s style into modern day. What is the look of a Wellesley Girl, circa 1950, and how did you define it?
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