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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | October 6, 1993
Molly Ivins is back and the "g's" are droppin' like the defenders at the Alamo. It was like findin' Castro in the refrigerator -- a favorite Molly-ism -- seein' her last compilation of columns on the New York Times best-seller list. Who knew the world was waitin' to hear about the Texas Legislature? As they say in Amarillo, the book bidness is strange.OK, that's out of my system. But reading Ms. Ivins is like talking to my Southern relatives, or drinking mint juleps; it brings out the drawl in me.When Ms. Ivins last checked in -- with "Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She?"
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Folks who can't handle too much truth have been relieved of a major burr under their saddles. Of all the fellow commentators to whom I have paid the honor of "Dang, I wish I'd said that first," Molly Ivins ranked at the top. Now she's gone. The Texas-based syndicated columnist died last week at age 62 after battling breast cancer since 1999. She fought it with the relentless energy she devoted to crusades against numerous other diseases, most of them political. Her voice was that of the Southern progressive, a courageous breed of people who won my respect and admiration during the rough days of the civil rights revolution in the 1950s and 1960s.
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NEWS
By Elaine Woo and Elaine Woo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 1, 2007
Molly Ivins, the irrepressibly irreverent political humorist and syndicated columnist who skewered legislators, governors and presidents, especially those from her beloved Texas, died yesterday at her home in Austin after a long battle with cancer. She was 62. Ms. Ivins learned in 1999 that she had a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer. After overcoming two recurrences, she became ill again last year as the disease spread through her body. Her death was announced by the Texas Observer, where she began her career 30 years ago. In her last weeks, she devoted her waning energy to what she called "an old-fashioned newspaper campaign" against President Bush's plan to escalate the Iraq war. "We are the people who run this country.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | February 5, 2007
This column was supposed to have been a "Get Well" valentine to Molly Ivins. That was the plan. But cancer hates plans, and so instead I have come to praise one of my favorite columnists, who has left this world too soon. Ms. Ivins, the syndicated writer beloved by liberals and despised by conservatives (at least most of them), died Wednesday after a seven-year battle with breast cancer. Her parting words to readers: "Raise hell." I have no special claim to grief when it comes to Ms. Ivins.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1996
AUSTIN, Texas - On this blustery day in March, most of Central Texas is under a tornado watch, with formidable dark clouds poised to sweep down on the city. But in Molly Ivins' limestone house on the south side, an irony watch is in effect. Eyebrows arch. Tones shift subtly, creating aural quotation marks around seemingly innocuous comments."Stop and Smell the Roses," "Nothin' But Good Times Ahead"Then the Wall Street Journal asked [then-Vice President Bush] what went through his mind when his plane was shot down in World War II. "Well," replied Bush, "you go back to your fundamental values.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman | November 11, 1991
MOLLY IVINS CAN'T SAY THAT, CAN SHE? By Molly Ivins. Random House. 284 pages. $23. AS MOLLY Ivins tells the story, she had just been fired by the New York Times for describing a chicken-killing contest as a "gang-pluck," when she got a call from the Dallas Times-Herald."
NEWS
October 22, 1993
THE late American humorist Will Rogers was noted for saying he never met a man he didn't like. Political commentator Molly Ivins is noted for writings that suggest she has never met a public official she hasn't disliked.Will Rogers the lovable populist and Molly Ivins the acerbic wit seem an unlikely match. Yet there Ms. Ivins was in the Oct. 17 issue of The New York Times Book Review, raving about both Rogers and a new biography of him by Ben Yagoda. A sampling from her write-up:"Those of us who write political humor will want to study Will Rogers's approach to the players in public life.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Folks who can't handle too much truth have been relieved of a major burr under their saddles. Of all the fellow commentators to whom I have paid the honor of "Dang, I wish I'd said that first," Molly Ivins ranked at the top. Now she's gone. The Texas-based syndicated columnist died last week at age 62 after battling breast cancer since 1999. She fought it with the relentless energy she devoted to crusades against numerous other diseases, most of them political. Her voice was that of the Southern progressive, a courageous breed of people who won my respect and admiration during the rough days of the civil rights revolution in the 1950s and 1960s.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | February 5, 2007
This column was supposed to have been a "Get Well" valentine to Molly Ivins. That was the plan. But cancer hates plans, and so instead I have come to praise one of my favorite columnists, who has left this world too soon. Ms. Ivins, the syndicated writer beloved by liberals and despised by conservatives (at least most of them), died Wednesday after a seven-year battle with breast cancer. Her parting words to readers: "Raise hell." I have no special claim to grief when it comes to Ms. Ivins.
NEWS
June 17, 2002
Warming fears distract us from bigger issues Molly Ivins' rant about global warming was just unwarranted hysteria ("Stupefying stance on warming," Opinion Commentary, June 6). The world has gone through many warming and cooling cycles, generally related to solar cycles and sunspot activity. In the early years of the first millennium, for example, the average temperature was warmer than it is now. But in the early 1800s, we experienced global cooling (the "Little Ice Age"). And carbon dioxide levels have varied greatly over the ages.
NEWS
By Elaine Woo and Elaine Woo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 1, 2007
Molly Ivins, the irrepressibly irreverent political humorist and syndicated columnist who skewered legislators, governors and presidents, especially those from her beloved Texas, died yesterday at her home in Austin after a long battle with cancer. She was 62. Ms. Ivins learned in 1999 that she had a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer. After overcoming two recurrences, she became ill again last year as the disease spread through her body. Her death was announced by the Texas Observer, where she began her career 30 years ago. In her last weeks, she devoted her waning energy to what she called "an old-fashioned newspaper campaign" against President Bush's plan to escalate the Iraq war. "We are the people who run this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Puleo and Tom Puleo,The Hartford Courant | October 19, 2003
In the introduction to her first book, Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She? the author wryly laments that God gave guys like I.F. Stone, George Orwell and Albert Camus some pretty good material to write about -- namely fascism, communism, colonialism and McCarthyism. "All I got was Lubbock," she quipped about her small Texas hometown. "I suppose I could claim I did the best with what I had. Lord knows, Texas politics is a rich vein. Twenty-five years of reporting on the place and I still can't account for the lunatic quality of exaggeration, of being slightly larger than life, in a pie-eyed way, that afflicts the entire state."
NEWS
January 31, 2003
Damage awards create a crisis for medicine The American Medical Association (AMA) would like to clarify a few things for Molly Ivins ("Politics block cure for crisis," Opinion * Commentary, Jan. 23). When pregnant women cannot find an ob-gyn to provide prenatal care or deliver their babies because of the threat of lawsuits and skyrocketing liability insurance costs, the AMA considers that a crisis. When physicians who have trained for decades give up their lives' work, that is a crisis.
NEWS
June 17, 2002
Warming fears distract us from bigger issues Molly Ivins' rant about global warming was just unwarranted hysteria ("Stupefying stance on warming," Opinion Commentary, June 6). The world has gone through many warming and cooling cycles, generally related to solar cycles and sunspot activity. In the early years of the first millennium, for example, the average temperature was warmer than it is now. But in the early 1800s, we experienced global cooling (the "Little Ice Age"). And carbon dioxide levels have varied greatly over the ages.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1996
AUSTIN, Texas - On this blustery day in March, most of Central Texas is under a tornado watch, with formidable dark clouds poised to sweep down on the city. But in Molly Ivins' limestone house on the south side, an irony watch is in effect. Eyebrows arch. Tones shift subtly, creating aural quotation marks around seemingly innocuous comments."Stop and Smell the Roses," "Nothin' But Good Times Ahead"Then the Wall Street Journal asked [then-Vice President Bush] what went through his mind when his plane was shot down in World War II. "Well," replied Bush, "you go back to your fundamental values.
NEWS
October 22, 1993
THE late American humorist Will Rogers was noted for saying he never met a man he didn't like. Political commentator Molly Ivins is noted for writings that suggest she has never met a public official she hasn't disliked.Will Rogers the lovable populist and Molly Ivins the acerbic wit seem an unlikely match. Yet there Ms. Ivins was in the Oct. 17 issue of The New York Times Book Review, raving about both Rogers and a new biography of him by Ben Yagoda. A sampling from her write-up:"Those of us who write political humor will want to study Will Rogers's approach to the players in public life.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
Damage awards create a crisis for medicine The American Medical Association (AMA) would like to clarify a few things for Molly Ivins ("Politics block cure for crisis," Opinion * Commentary, Jan. 23). When pregnant women cannot find an ob-gyn to provide prenatal care or deliver their babies because of the threat of lawsuits and skyrocketing liability insurance costs, the AMA considers that a crisis. When physicians who have trained for decades give up their lives' work, that is a crisis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Puleo and Tom Puleo,The Hartford Courant | October 19, 2003
In the introduction to her first book, Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She? the author wryly laments that God gave guys like I.F. Stone, George Orwell and Albert Camus some pretty good material to write about -- namely fascism, communism, colonialism and McCarthyism. "All I got was Lubbock," she quipped about her small Texas hometown. "I suppose I could claim I did the best with what I had. Lord knows, Texas politics is a rich vein. Twenty-five years of reporting on the place and I still can't account for the lunatic quality of exaggeration, of being slightly larger than life, in a pie-eyed way, that afflicts the entire state."
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | October 6, 1993
Molly Ivins is back and the "g's" are droppin' like the defenders at the Alamo. It was like findin' Castro in the refrigerator -- a favorite Molly-ism -- seein' her last compilation of columns on the New York Times best-seller list. Who knew the world was waitin' to hear about the Texas Legislature? As they say in Amarillo, the book bidness is strange.OK, that's out of my system. But reading Ms. Ivins is like talking to my Southern relatives, or drinking mint juleps; it brings out the drawl in me.When Ms. Ivins last checked in -- with "Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She?"
NEWS
By Laura Lippman | November 11, 1991
MOLLY IVINS CAN'T SAY THAT, CAN SHE? By Molly Ivins. Random House. 284 pages. $23. AS MOLLY Ivins tells the story, she had just been fired by the New York Times for describing a chicken-killing contest as a "gang-pluck," when she got a call from the Dallas Times-Herald."
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