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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 4, 2008
Instruments aboard a Maryland-built spacecraft that soared past the planet Mercury in January have provided a real surprise: traces of water molecules in the hot little world's extremely thin atmosphere, scientists reported yesterday. It's not clear where they came from yet, but astronomers suspect that the water molecules are being blasted from the planet's surface by the solar wind, along with ions of sodium, calcium and magnesium - all clues to the chemical composition of surface material.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Description: A meteorite that rained fragments on a frozen lake in Canada in January 2000 is revealing new insights on protein molecules thought to help explain the origins of life. The proteins can have two types of orientations — right- or left-handed, they are called — and life is not thought to be able to function without a mix of both. Scientists explored the presence of left-handed amino acids inside the meteorite fragments. Researchers: Daniel Glavin of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt was the lead author of the research, published last month, along with Jason Dworkin, Aaron Burton and Jamie Elsila of the Goddard center and Christopher Herd of the University of Alberta in Canada.
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NEWS
By Newsday | October 26, 1993
Discovery of a natural molecule that the AIDS virus uses like a trapdoor to invade white blood cells was reported by French researchers, who hope it will lead to vaccines or treatments for AIDS.According to a report released yesterday by the Pasteur Institute at a news conference in Paris, virologist Ara Hovanessian's research team isolated a co-receptor that the AIDS virus uses in tandem with the well-known CD4 receptor.The CD4 cells -- white blood cells bearing CD4 surface molecules -- are the major target of the AIDS virus.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 8, 2008
With a new analytical technique, a fingerprint can now reveal much more than the identity of a person. It can also identify what the person has been touching - drugs, explosives or poisons, for example. Writing in today's issue of the journal Science, Dr. R. Graham Cooks, a professor of chemistry at Purdue University, and his colleagues describe how a laboratory technique, mass spectrometry, could find a wider application in crime investigations. The equipment to perform such tests is commercially available, although prohibitively expensive for all but the largest crime laboratories.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff | February 24, 2003
New Frontier For decades, scientists have neglected RNA molecules, assuming that they were little more than messengers carrying genetic instructions from DNA to manufacture the proteins that rule our lives. Now, thanks to a spate of discoveries in recent years, it appears that humble RNA assumes a surprising variety of other forms that do much more than deliver messages. Snippets of RNA actually become enforcers in the cell, interfering with the instructions from certain genes or shutting them down altogether.
NEWS
By Tom Siegfried and Tom Siegfried,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 10, 1999
DALLAS -- More than any other science, chemistry provided the products that made the 20th century modern.From plastics to Prozac, new chemicals from the lab invaded every aspect of ordinary life. Chemists produced new sources of clothes for people, tires and gas for cars, cures for diseases. Fertilizers, pesticides, refrigerants, birth-control pills, air conditioners and copy machines owe their existence to clever chemists.It was just a matter of mastering the magic of molecules.As the science in charge of understanding how molecules are made and what they do, chemistry touches all aspects of life, as well as most other sciences.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1997
Johns Hopkins University chemical engineer Dr. Denis Wirtz has developed a sort of molecular towing service.Wirtz has devised a way to hitch tiny iron-oxide beads to individual DNA molecules. Then, using a computer keyboard or joystick, he can alter magnetic fields around the molecules to tow the beads and their DNA wherever he wants -- in three dimensions, and all by remote control.Dyed so that they fluoresce with a blue glow, the threadlike DNA strands can be seen on a video screen, drifting and turning obediently in ghostly formation as they move through a dark sea of nonbeaded DNA."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2004
Like the old Seinfeld show, the story of nanotubes is a story about nothing. Or nearly nothing. To the naked eye, a vial of nanotubes looks like a fine black powder, the sort of stuff you can wipe off the disks of your car's brakes. "It's basically soot," said Peter J. Burke, a researcher at the University of California at Irvine. In fact, nanotubes are tiny carbon molecules with astonishing strength and lightness, electrical conductivity, heat conductivity and sharpness. Since nanotubes were discovered in 1991, their boosters have promised a revolution in products, including high-strength aircraft parts, faster computers, more powerful batteries, cheaper and more efficient video displays and lights, better fuel cells and disposable chemical and biological sensors.
NEWS
By Mary Azrael | March 7, 1995
Slowed down steam, water numbed to sleep, its dream of a more spacious body clear, unclear. Waking may be gradual, or, under pressure, sudden (as the naive sole grasps too late). An agitating weight, a layer of molecules hot under the collar and it slips its skin, sly, upsetting, shifts, springs released from slow to fast. Answer: melting ice
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 31, 1992
SAN DIEGO -- Scientists at Scripps Research Institute will announce today that they have discovered a process that can be used to compress 10 million years of molecular evolution into 10 days, thus expediting laboratory experiments.The discovery, reported in today's issue of Science, offers insights into the process of evolution as well as providing possible new tools for genetic engineering, according to experts familiar with the study."This is closer to evolution than what anyone has done before," said Leslie Orgel, a chemist with the Salk Institute.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 4, 2008
Instruments aboard a Maryland-built spacecraft that soared past the planet Mercury in January have provided a real surprise: traces of water molecules in the hot little world's extremely thin atmosphere, scientists reported yesterday. It's not clear where they came from yet, but astronomers suspect that the water molecules are being blasted from the planet's surface by the solar wind, along with ions of sodium, calcium and magnesium - all clues to the chemical composition of surface material.
FEATURES
May 29, 2008
Researchers have identified seven possibilities for the next generation of mosquito repellent, some of which may work several times longer than the current standard-bearer, DEET. The next step: safety testing to make sure they're not harmful. While the new repellents aren't likely to be available commercially for a few years, early tests on cloth were promising, with some chemicals repelling mosquitoes for as long as 73 days and many working for 40 days to 50 days, compared to an average of 17.5 days with DEET, according to a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | March 20, 2008
Pushing the Hubble Space Telescope to its limits, astronomers say they have made the first discovery of the organic molecule methane in the atmosphere of a planet circling a sun-like star. Although methane can be generated by cows and rotting garbage, scientists say there's little chance that they've stumbled on signs of life on the planet, about 63 light-years from Earth. The Jupiter-size world's atmosphere sizzles at 1,700 degrees Fahrenheit. But their apparent success in detecting the gas so far away gives them confidence that they'll be able to find it again someday on a smaller, cooler planet circling a different star.
NEWS
By Ronald Kotulak and Ronald Kotulak,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 1, 2006
CHICAGO -- Vaccines, the most potent medical weapon ever devised to vanquish deadly germs, are being called on to do something totally different and culturally revolutionary - to inoculate people against bad habits such as overeating, cigarette smoking and drug use. Whether this new era of vaccine research can actually subdue many of the poor lifestyle choices that are today's biggest threats to health, causing obesity, cancer, heart disease and other...
NEWS
By CAROLYN Y. JOHNSON and CAROLYN Y. JOHNSON,The Boston Globe | September 8, 2006
Glue makes modern life possible, quietly holding together electronics, houses, planes, shoes and more with unseen chemical bonds that are taken for granted - until something breaks. Bolts held in place with epoxy are the likely culprit in the July collapse of ceiling panels in Boston's Big Dig tunnel. But adhesives can be superior to conventional nuts and bolts in some circumstances. Scientists and companies are searching for even better glues - substances that will stick under water or grip even the slipperiest surfaces.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | February 27, 2006
Pancreatic cancer is relentless: Nearly all of the 30,000 Americans diagnosed annually with the disease die within 12 months. The early symptoms, back pain and indigestion, are so vague that most patients have no idea that they have cancer. By the time it's detected, the disease has usually spread to the point that it is untreatable. But what if a simple blood test could alert doctors to pancreatic cancer early enough to treat it? Such a test does not exist, but University of Nebraska researcher Michael Hollingsworth thinks he has a solid lead.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | August 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Discovery of a way to activate stalled molecular water pumps inside human cells "opens the way" to arresting the course of cystic fibrosis, one of the most common fatal genetic diseases in America, government health officials said yesterday.With luck, a drug to treat cystic fibrosis based on that discovery could be at the testing stage within a year, said Dr. Michael R. Knowles, one of three University of North Carolina medical school researchers who announced the finding.The basic defect is the inability of the cells to maintain sufficient water to thin mucus in the lungs, he said.
NEWS
June 27, 1999
To make the greatest omelet in the world, make sure that the eggs are at room temperature by leaving them out of the refrigerator for 30 minutes before using them. Cold eggs are too stiff for an omelet. Also, if you always add a little milk to your omelet, try adding a small amount of water instead. The water will increase the volume at least three times more than the milk. The water molecules surround the eggs' protein, forcing you to use more heat to cook the protein and make it coagulate.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
Scientists say a moist towel soaked with a common food preservative could turn into an effective tool for combating the next anthrax attack. Nisin, a compound found in hot dogs and other processed foods, has been shown to stop the spread of anthrax spores, and a Gaithersburg research firm is investigating its potential for preventing the spread of anthrax on human skin. Although the research is preliminary, if nisin works out, it would be the first topical treatment of its kind, according to researchers who presented findings at a scientific conference this week in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2004
Like the old Seinfeld show, the story of nanotubes is a story about nothing. Or nearly nothing. To the naked eye, a vial of nanotubes looks like a fine black powder, the sort of stuff you can wipe off the disks of your car's brakes. "It's basically soot," said Peter J. Burke, a researcher at the University of California at Irvine. In fact, nanotubes are tiny carbon molecules with astonishing strength and lightness, electrical conductivity, heat conductivity and sharpness. Since nanotubes were discovered in 1991, their boosters have promised a revolution in products, including high-strength aircraft parts, faster computers, more powerful batteries, cheaper and more efficient video displays and lights, better fuel cells and disposable chemical and biological sensors.
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