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Molecular Biology

BUSINESS
December 14, 1998
New positionsHuman Genome promotes Ruben to VP for researchHuman Genome Sciences Inc. promoted Steven M. Ruben to the new position of vice president, research. Ruben was the first person hired by HGSI to hold the job title of scientist.Before joining HGSI, he was with the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology. He earned his doctorate in cell and molecular biology from the University of Cincinnati, has published many scientific articles and is a co-inventor of several HGSI patents.HGSI also promoted Timothy A. Coleman to director, protein development, and A. Anders Brookes to director, intellectual property.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1998
Dr. Robert Patrick Wade Jr., an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine who earned wide acclaim for research on muscle gene regulation and muscle diseases, died Tuesday of brain cancer at his Columbia residence. He was 43.A faculty member in the school's department of biochemistry and molecular biology since 1989, Dr. Wade had made significant discoveries regarding how genes and the genetic code control muscular development."By understanding the control of muscular development, we are then able to apply that knowledge to counteract diseases that affect muscles," said Dr. Donald L. Gill, a longtime colleague and professor of biochemistry at the medical school.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1998
Two quiet revolutionaries were honored yesterday at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine nearly 30 years after their discovery of the first tools for taking apart and rewiring DNA, the molecule that controls cellular life.Daniel Nathans and Hamilton O. Smith helped spark the genetic revolution in the late 1960s and early 1970s, after Smith discovered a chemical, called a restriction enzyme, that cuts DNA at specific points.Their work made it practical, for the first time, to describe the precise structure of a sizable length of DNA, to pinpoint genes and to swap one gene for another.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Dr. Ian Wilmut, walking emblem of a Brave New World, was introduced in Baltimore yesterday to polite applause -- as if he'd just bogeyed the fourth hole at Augusta.About 100 scientists kept their seats in a second-floor conference room at the Hyatt Regency and clapped for a few seconds. The ovation did not rattle the crystal beads on the two chandeliers nor shudder the water in an array of crystal pitchers. No one whooped.And so in this dignified manner went day one of the two-day conference on the Impact of Molecular Biology on Animal Health and Production Research, which happened to include by accident of timing a man whose success in sheep cloning was hailed two weeks ago as a stunning breakthrough.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 1996
LONDON -- A medical bond forged on the sands of North Africa during World War II was strengthened this week when doctors from the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and Guy's Hospital in London engaged in a scientific symposium on the promise and reality of molecular medicine.The 50-year partnership was created when doctors from the two hospitals served together in Allied medical units. Returning home, they instituted an exchange program in 1946 to maintain friendships and share ideas.The program, which enables doctors and medical students to cross the Atlantic to study and work together, has yielded impressive results.
NEWS
October 5, 1994
Andre Lwoff, 92, a pioneer in the field of molecular biology and a winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Medicine, died Friday in Paris. He shared his Nobel with two French colleagues, Francois Jacob and Jacques Monod, for the discovery that the genetic material of a virus can be assimilated by bacteria and passed on to succeeding generations. He had discovered earlier that genetic material can exist outside the cell's nucleus.William Daniel Murray, 85, who was elevated to the federal bench in 1949, died Monday in Butte, Mont.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 27, 1994
NEW YORK -- Over the years, scientists at Rockefeller University -- one of the world's pre-eminent research institutions -- have identified DNA, found the first cancer virus, grown the malaria parasite and wrestled with some of biology's most complex problems.Now, they are trying to solve their most terrifying mystery: Who may be trying to kill them?Police disclosed yesterday that someone at the research campus bordering the East River in Manhattan put poison in coffee and tea, deliberately left gas jets on in a molecular biology laboratory, set a fire and sent threatening letters to two eminent female scientists.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | March 4, 1993
A Columbia biotechnology education firm run by a pair of Ph.D.s in biology went international last month, teaching Israeli scientists and doctors methods for studying diseases and genetic engineering.Robert E. Farrell Jr., 32, and Gregory S. Leppert, 33, specialists in molecular biology, founded Exon-Intron Inc. in 1987 while graduate students at Catholic University in Washington. Last month, they ran two seven-day laboratory workshops at the Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine in Haifa, Israel.
NEWS
October 18, 1992
Different FlagsRecently you printed a story about the effect the budget will have on the University of Maryland System. In your story you mentioned the need to protect the "flagship" campus (College ++ Park) and the need to eliminate some programs.Unfortunately, to different parts of the academic and political communities of Maryland, "flagship campus" means different things. Legislation can designate a single flagship campus. But legislation cannot cause creativity, intellectual diversity, academic achievements and "drive" to instantly develop.
NEWS
June 10, 1991
TOBACCO'S EMBATTLED defenders may have the last laugh on thosewho would like the ban it.In an experimental project that may in a few years produce an anti-AIDS drug, genetically engineered tobacco plants are hard at work in a field in Raleigh, N.C., synthesizing chemicals that are hard to produce in industrial plants.Tobacco, according to plant researchers, is the world's "white mouse," long studied by plant breeders and botanists. nTC Researchers at North Carolina State University have inserted genes to cause the tobacco plants to produce alpha trichosanthin, or "compound Q," a potential AIDS drug; human blood proteins, and the alpha amylase enzyme, used in the food industry to convert starch to glucose.
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