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NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2003
MOLECULAR biologists aren't generally a grumpy lot, but they are grumbling these days that corporate interests - particularly California-based Geron Corp. - may be stifling development of promising new anti-cancer drugs called telomerase inhibitors. Telomerase is a weird enzyme - part protein, part RNA. Its job is to restore a tiny bit of DNA at the ends of chromosomes. As normal cells divide over time, these tiny bits of DNA, called telomeres, get shorter until they virtually disappear.
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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | March 4, 1993
A Columbia biotechnology education firm run by a pair of Ph.D.s in biology went international last month, teaching Israeli scientists and doctors methods for studying diseases and genetic engineering.Robert E. Farrell Jr., 32, and Gregory S. Leppert, 33, specialists in molecular biology, founded Exon-Intron Inc. in 1987 while graduate students at Catholic University in Washington. Last month, they ran two seven-day laboratory workshops at the Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine in Haifa, Israel.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1998
Dr. Robert Patrick Wade Jr., an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine who earned wide acclaim for research on muscle gene regulation and muscle diseases, died Tuesday of brain cancer at his Columbia residence. He was 43.A faculty member in the school's department of biochemistry and molecular biology since 1989, Dr. Wade had made significant discoveries regarding how genes and the genetic code control muscular development."By understanding the control of muscular development, we are then able to apply that knowledge to counteract diseases that affect muscles," said Dr. Donald L. Gill, a longtime colleague and professor of biochemistry at the medical school.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1998
Two quiet revolutionaries were honored yesterday at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine nearly 30 years after their discovery of the first tools for taking apart and rewiring DNA, the molecule that controls cellular life.Daniel Nathans and Hamilton O. Smith helped spark the genetic revolution in the late 1960s and early 1970s, after Smith discovered a chemical, called a restriction enzyme, that cuts DNA at specific points.Their work made it practical, for the first time, to describe the precise structure of a sizable length of DNA, to pinpoint genes and to swap one gene for another.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | September 4, 2002
A LOT OF guys experience "beer moments." That is what happens when you wrap your hand around a particularly delectable brew and the meaning of life becomes clear to you. For Stephen Demczuk, the 50-year-old president of Baltimore-Washington Beer Works, the beer moment occurred 19 years ago in a pub in the German town of Mainz. At a colleague's suggestion, he had ordered a glass of Pilsner Urquell, a Czech lager. Demczuk grew up in Dundalk, graduated from Patapsco High School and the University of Maryland and had a doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biology from the University of Oklahoma.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
Francis H.C. Crick, the late scientist who helped discover the "double helix" structure of DNA that led to a Nobel Prize and a renaissance within the field of molecular biology, was not - to Al Seckel's dismay - a pack rat. Years ago, Crick had given away a manuscript detailing his DNA work to a scientist living in Wales, who in turn sold it to a San Francisco doctor for $2,000. That news floored Seckel when he found out a decade ago. "The thing was probably worth about a quarter of a million," he said yesterday when contacted in California.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 10, 2011
Horace Freeland Judson, the author of a widely praised history of molecular biology who also taught at the Johns Hopkins University, died of a stroke Friday at his Roland Park home. He was 80. For his book "The Eighth Day of Creation," he interviewed nearly 100 scientists he called "makers of the revolution in biology" and told the story of the foundations of modern genetics. "He was a gifted person with a deep understanding of science," said Dr. Paul R. McHugh, a friend who was psychiatrist in chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1975 to 2001.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Dr. Ian Wilmut, walking emblem of a Brave New World, was introduced in Baltimore yesterday to polite applause -- as if he'd just bogeyed the fourth hole at Augusta.About 100 scientists kept their seats in a second-floor conference room at the Hyatt Regency and clapped for a few seconds. The ovation did not rattle the crystal beads on the two chandeliers nor shudder the water in an array of crystal pitchers. No one whooped.And so in this dignified manner went day one of the two-day conference on the Impact of Molecular Biology on Animal Health and Production Research, which happened to include by accident of timing a man whose success in sheep cloning was hailed two weeks ago as a stunning breakthrough.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 10, 2006
Cecile M. Pickart, a Johns Hopkins scientist and teacher who worked to find treatments for cancer and Alzheimer's disease by studying a critical cellular protein, died Wednesday at her Tuscany-Canterbury home. She was 51. Diagnosed with kidney cancer four years ago, she died of the disease "wrapped in the shawl that all her former students gave her last summer with their names embroidered on it," said her partner, Jennifer Rose. A professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dr. Pickart studied the protein ubiquitin, so named because it is found in all animal cells.
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