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By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2001
Nineteen of the country's best and brightest high school students will study molecular biology at the Western Maryland College Summer Science Institute later this month, as the program celebrates its 20th anniversary. "There will be lectures about how DNA works and, of course, we'll spend a large amount of time in the lab doing hands-on work analyzing DNA," said Randy Morrison, assistant professor of biology at the college. This is the second year Morrison will teach at the institute.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 10, 2011
Horace Freeland Judson, the author of a widely praised history of molecular biology who also taught at the Johns Hopkins University, died of a stroke Friday at his Roland Park home. He was 80. For his book "The Eighth Day of Creation," he interviewed nearly 100 scientists he called "makers of the revolution in biology" and told the story of the foundations of modern genetics. "He was a gifted person with a deep understanding of science," said Dr. Paul R. McHugh, a friend who was psychiatrist in chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1975 to 2001.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2004
Francis H.C. Crick, the Nobel laureate whose co-discovery of DNA's "double-helix" reshaped modern genetics and led to the creation of an indispensable tool for pursuits ranging from curing disease to fighting crime, died Wednesday in a hospital in San Diego. He was 88. The resident of La Jolla, Calif., had suffered from colon cancer for several years. An intensely curious, creative man, Dr. Crick is best known for the two-year collaboration with James D. Watson that yielded a stunning architectural description of the basic building blocks of life.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | May 28, 2008
A Johns Hopkins University molecular biologist is among the 56 researchers who will share $600 million in grants awarded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Duojia Pan, an associate professor of molecular biology and genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will receive about $500,000 a year for five years to study how organs control their own growth. "I'm really excited about this," said Pan, who is known as D.J. "It's not only the money - it's an honor." Announced Monday, the awards will go to innovative scientists who are conducting research on cutting-edge topics.
NEWS
By Gina Kolata and Gina Kolata,New York Times News Service | May 3, 1991
Scientists have taken the first step toward developing a method for detecting certain kinds of cancer simply by analyzing the cells that are shed daily in bodily fluids.They have shown that with a standard test, they can pick out a few aberrant genes indicative of cancer from among a large number of mostly normal cells.The finding is expected to lead to a simple new type of cancer test that could find cancers early enough to treat or cure them.It is the outgrowth of a decade of accumulating progress in understanding the molecular biology of cancer cells.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 27, 1994
NEW YORK -- Over the years, scientists at Rockefeller University -- one of the world's pre-eminent research institutions -- have identified DNA, found the first cancer virus, grown the malaria parasite and wrestled with some of biology's most complex problems.Now, they are trying to solve their most terrifying mystery: Who may be trying to kill them?Police disclosed yesterday that someone at the research campus bordering the East River in Manhattan put poison in coffee and tea, deliberately left gas jets on in a molecular biology laboratory, set a fire and sent threatening letters to two eminent female scientists.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1998
New positionsHuman Genome promotes Ruben to VP for researchHuman Genome Sciences Inc. promoted Steven M. Ruben to the new position of vice president, research. Ruben was the first person hired by HGSI to hold the job title of scientist.Before joining HGSI, he was with the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology. He earned his doctorate in cell and molecular biology from the University of Cincinnati, has published many scientific articles and is a co-inventor of several HGSI patents.HGSI also promoted Timothy A. Coleman to director, protein development, and A. Anders Brookes to director, intellectual property.
NEWS
June 10, 1991
TOBACCO'S EMBATTLED defenders may have the last laugh on thosewho would like the ban it.In an experimental project that may in a few years produce an anti-AIDS drug, genetically engineered tobacco plants are hard at work in a field in Raleigh, N.C., synthesizing chemicals that are hard to produce in industrial plants.Tobacco, according to plant researchers, is the world's "white mouse," long studied by plant breeders and botanists. nTC Researchers at North Carolina State University have inserted genes to cause the tobacco plants to produce alpha trichosanthin, or "compound Q," a potential AIDS drug; human blood proteins, and the alpha amylase enzyme, used in the food industry to convert starch to glucose.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | May 28, 2008
A Johns Hopkins University molecular biologist is among the 56 researchers who will share $600 million in grants awarded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Duojia Pan, an associate professor of molecular biology and genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will receive about $500,000 a year for five years to study how organs control their own growth. "I'm really excited about this," said Pan, who is known as D.J. "It's not only the money - it's an honor." Announced Monday, the awards will go to innovative scientists who are conducting research on cutting-edge topics.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 1996
LONDON -- A medical bond forged on the sands of North Africa during World War II was strengthened this week when doctors from the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and Guy's Hospital in London engaged in a scientific symposium on the promise and reality of molecular medicine.The 50-year partnership was created when doctors from the two hospitals served together in Allied medical units. Returning home, they instituted an exchange program in 1946 to maintain friendships and share ideas.The program, which enables doctors and medical students to cross the Atlantic to study and work together, has yielded impressive results.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 10, 2006
Cecile M. Pickart, a Johns Hopkins scientist and teacher who worked to find treatments for cancer and Alzheimer's disease by studying a critical cellular protein, died Wednesday at her Tuscany-Canterbury home. She was 51. Diagnosed with kidney cancer four years ago, she died of the disease "wrapped in the shawl that all her former students gave her last summer with their names embroidered on it," said her partner, Jennifer Rose. A professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dr. Pickart studied the protein ubiquitin, so named because it is found in all animal cells.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
Francis H.C. Crick, the late scientist who helped discover the "double helix" structure of DNA that led to a Nobel Prize and a renaissance within the field of molecular biology, was not - to Al Seckel's dismay - a pack rat. Years ago, Crick had given away a manuscript detailing his DNA work to a scientist living in Wales, who in turn sold it to a San Francisco doctor for $2,000. That news floored Seckel when he found out a decade ago. "The thing was probably worth about a quarter of a million," he said yesterday when contacted in California.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2004
Francis H.C. Crick, the Nobel laureate whose co-discovery of DNA's "double-helix" reshaped modern genetics and led to the creation of an indispensable tool for pursuits ranging from curing disease to fighting crime, died Wednesday in a hospital in San Diego. He was 88. The resident of La Jolla, Calif., had suffered from colon cancer for several years. An intensely curious, creative man, Dr. Crick is best known for the two-year collaboration with James D. Watson that yielded a stunning architectural description of the basic building blocks of life.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2003
MOLECULAR biologists aren't generally a grumpy lot, but they are grumbling these days that corporate interests - particularly California-based Geron Corp. - may be stifling development of promising new anti-cancer drugs called telomerase inhibitors. Telomerase is a weird enzyme - part protein, part RNA. Its job is to restore a tiny bit of DNA at the ends of chromosomes. As normal cells divide over time, these tiny bits of DNA, called telomeres, get shorter until they virtually disappear.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | September 4, 2002
A LOT OF guys experience "beer moments." That is what happens when you wrap your hand around a particularly delectable brew and the meaning of life becomes clear to you. For Stephen Demczuk, the 50-year-old president of Baltimore-Washington Beer Works, the beer moment occurred 19 years ago in a pub in the German town of Mainz. At a colleague's suggestion, he had ordered a glass of Pilsner Urquell, a Czech lager. Demczuk grew up in Dundalk, graduated from Patapsco High School and the University of Maryland and had a doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biology from the University of Oklahoma.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2001
Nineteen of the country's best and brightest high school students will study molecular biology at the Western Maryland College Summer Science Institute later this month, as the program celebrates its 20th anniversary. "There will be lectures about how DNA works and, of course, we'll spend a large amount of time in the lab doing hands-on work analyzing DNA," said Randy Morrison, assistant professor of biology at the college. This is the second year Morrison will teach at the institute.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
A Johns Hopkins medical school student was found dead yesterday at the North Baltimore townhouse where he lived, an apparent victim of carbon monoxide poisoning from a car that had been left running in his garage, authorities said. Nupur D. Thedki, 27, was enrolled in an academically challenging program in which students at the School of Medicine also study for a doctoral degree. He had completed two years of medical school and was studying for his Ph.D. in molecular biology. "He was doing great stuff," said Dr. Jeremy Nathans, who runs the school's molecular biology lab. "We're in a state of shock."
NEWS
October 5, 1994
Andre Lwoff, 92, a pioneer in the field of molecular biology and a winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Medicine, died Friday in Paris. He shared his Nobel with two French colleagues, Francois Jacob and Jacques Monod, for the discovery that the genetic material of a virus can be assimilated by bacteria and passed on to succeeding generations. He had discovered earlier that genetic material can exist outside the cell's nucleus.William Daniel Murray, 85, who was elevated to the federal bench in 1949, died Monday in Butte, Mont.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
A Johns Hopkins medical school student was found dead yesterday at the North Baltimore townhouse where he lived, an apparent victim of carbon monoxide poisoning from a car that had been left running in his garage, authorities said. Nupur D. Thedki, 27, was enrolled in an academically challenging program in which students at the School of Medicine also study for a doctoral degree. He had completed two years of medical school and was studying for his Ph.D. in molecular biology. "He was doing great stuff," said Dr. Jeremy Nathans, who runs the school's molecular biology lab. "We're in a state of shock."
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