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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 30, 1990
KISHINEV, Moldova, U.S.S.R. -- Dwarfed by a statue of the 16th-century Moldovan prince Stefan the Great, a diminutive schoolteacher named Anna Kochmaryuk called her people to the defense of the homeland."
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TRAVEL
December 6, 2009
Which landlocked country is surrounded by Romania and Ukraine? Answer: : Moldova
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 27, 1990
KISHINEV, U.S.S.R. -- The parliament of the Soviet republic Moldova clamped a two-month state of emergency on its southern districts yesterday in an attempt to stop the secession of the Gagauz ethnic minority.The decision came as thousands of Moldovans massed at the edge of the Gagauz region, some armed with metal chains and truncheons, in response to a call from nationalist leaders to "save the republic."The breakaway "Gagauz Republic" was proclaimed in August at a congress of Gagauz elected officials and was immediately declared illegal by the Moldovan parliament.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 15, 2003
EVERY NOW AND THEN, you stumble across a story that is so wonderful you say to yourself: "If this story were made into a movie, Roger Ebert would deliberately expose himself to mutating radiation so he could grow additional thumbs and point them up." Today I want to tell you such a story. It was brought to my attention by alert reader C. Erik Enockson, and it has what Aristotle called the Four Essential Elements of Drama: (1) despair, (2) intrigue, (3) Canadians and (4) snorkeling. When you read this story, you're going to think I made it up. But I ask you: Have I ever lied to you?
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 3, 1992
MOSCOW -- Ethnic fighting flared in a southwestern splinter of the former Soviet Union yesterday, while ongoing battles brought dozens of new deaths in the Nagorno-Karabakh region, where an Afghanistan War hero was dispatched by Russia to withdraw the last of the Soviet troops.In the breakaway section of the former Soviet republic of Moldova, clashes between separatists and police left four dead and 15 people injured, according to reports from the region, which is near the Romanian border.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 29, 1992
MOSCOW -- President Mircea Snegur of Moldova imposed a state of emergency on the former Soviet republic yesterday, ordering his forces to take the offensive against Russian and Ukrainian separatists but acknowledging that it may bring civil war to his country.Mr. Snegur, declaring that all efforts at a political settlement had failed in the escalating, two-year conflict, told his nation, "As God as my witness, I never wanted bloodshed, (but) the hour has come when we can no longer delay putting our own house in order in the way that we consider proper."
NEWS
By Serge Schmemann and Serge Schmemann,New York Times News Service | June 23, 1992
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin flew to the Black Sea yesterday to dampen tensions with Ukraine and Georgia. But he had only new threats for Moldovans locked in fresh violence with their secessionist Russian and Ukrainian minority.Arriving in the Russian resort city of Sochi on the northeastern Black Sea coast for talks with President Leonid M. Kravchuk of Ukraine, Mr. Yeltsin said the discussions would cover the gamut of disputes between their countries, from economic issues to control of the Crimean Peninsula and the Black Sea Fleet, as well as the region's ethnic conflicts.
NEWS
March 1, 2001
IN THE ANCIENT land of Muscovy, two mileposts were recorded this week: former President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who presided over the Soviet Union's dissolution, celebrated his 70th birthday and the former Soviet republic of Moldova returned Communists to power. Tiny Moldova exists today largely as a legacy of Hitler's and Stalin's World War II treachery. Much of its territory was snatched from adjoining Romania. In fact, more than 64 percent of Moldovans are ethnically and linguistically Romanian.
TRAVEL
December 6, 2009
Which landlocked country is surrounded by Romania and Ukraine? Answer: : Moldova
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 24, 1992
In nostalgia for the great age of American smokestack industry, nothing beats a railroad strike.Old Ross Perot had it easy. He is about to find out what hardball is.A war between Russia and Moldova the world can do without.XTC No matter what the Supreme Court says, it is against the law to burn a cross in your neighbor's yard. Or anything in your neighbor's yard. In your own yard, maybe it's OK, so go intimidate yourself.
NEWS
April 19, 2003
Russell G. Clark, 77, a retired U.S. District Court judge who ordered Missouri to wipe out segregation from its schools, died Thursday in Springfield, Mo. The Kansas City desegregation case, which has spanned 26 years and cost more than $2 billion, won Judge Clark both praise and criticism. He was assigned to oversee the case shortly after he was appointed to the federal bench in 1977. He presided over the case until 1997, three years before his retirement. In 1984, Judge Clark declared that the school district's "discriminatory and state-fostered dual school system for black and white students must be eliminated."
NEWS
May 1, 2001
WHEN THE Soviet Union disintegrated, independent Ukraine became Europe's second largest and fourth most populous country. Shared borders with Russia, Belarus, Moldova, Romania, Hungary, Slovakia and Poland give it a pivotal strategic location. This geographic centrality - and access to the Black Sea - has often made Ukraine a vassal of more powerful neighbors. Russia has had a strong political and cultural influence. Although Ukrainians make up 65 percent of the population, 32 percent identify themselves as ethnic Russians.
NEWS
March 1, 2001
IN THE ANCIENT land of Muscovy, two mileposts were recorded this week: former President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who presided over the Soviet Union's dissolution, celebrated his 70th birthday and the former Soviet republic of Moldova returned Communists to power. Tiny Moldova exists today largely as a legacy of Hitler's and Stalin's World War II treachery. Much of its territory was snatched from adjoining Romania. In fact, more than 64 percent of Moldovans are ethnically and linguistically Romanian.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1999
Iosif Mogilevskiy was hunting for a job. But not just any job.New to Baltimore after fleeing anti-Semitism in the former Soviet Union, Mogilevskiy wanted to resume his career. He was, after all, an expert in his field, an authority on sunflowers -- or, more precisely, the science of squeezing oil from sunflower seeds."Want work sunflower factory," he would say in what little English he knew.What followed was a job search unlike any other in memory at the Pikesville offices of the Jewish Vocational Service, which has located work for many of the 8,000 Russian-speaking immigrants who have settled in the Baltimore area since 1991.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 26, 1995
TIRASPOL, Moldova -- Brusque, even coarse and perpetually scowling, Alexander Lebed is on his way to becoming a popular hero in Russia: a rough-and-ready lieutenant general who speaks his mind but who kept his troops out of war.Last week, Russians began to talk seriously about him as a candidate for president.General Lebed is on the periphery of the Russian world -- in Moldova, a small country far from Moscow. He commands an army that stayed behind when the Soviet Union broke up, and he used that army in 1992 to smother a nasty little war of secession.
NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND | December 19, 1993
Moscow -- So far, Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky has been uncharacteristically mum on the fate of Ilie Ilascu, a man whose death, if it should happen, could come to stand for the defining moment of a resurgent Russian nationalism.That nationalism is suddenly visible everywhere. Mr. Zhirinovsky startling success in last Sunday's elections was emblematic of an emboldened Russian nationalism, not only in Russia proper but among ethnic Russians living in the other former republics of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 15, 2003
EVERY NOW AND THEN, you stumble across a story that is so wonderful you say to yourself: "If this story were made into a movie, Roger Ebert would deliberately expose himself to mutating radiation so he could grow additional thumbs and point them up." Today I want to tell you such a story. It was brought to my attention by alert reader C. Erik Enockson, and it has what Aristotle called the Four Essential Elements of Drama: (1) despair, (2) intrigue, (3) Canadians and (4) snorkeling. When you read this story, you're going to think I made it up. But I ask you: Have I ever lied to you?
NEWS
June 27, 1992
For the foreseeable future, the Black Sea group for economic cooperation formed by Russia and 10 nations of the Balkan Peninsula is likely to remain a mere letter of intent, considering the region's political and economic turmoil. But this joint effort is a welcome one because it encourages leaders of these neighboring countries to sit down together and talk about their common problems.Indeed, it was a miracle that leaders of Albania, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Moldova, Ukraine, Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia and Turkey were able to agree to create a Black Sea zone that intends to coordinate regional transportation and communications, information and ecology, investment and power.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | June 3, 1993
Chicago. -- Some Americans find it hard to accept the fact that we are not entirely in charge of the world's destiny. We are still the only superpower, but we have a new awareness of our own limited resources, and so do other nations. The ''leader of the free world'' may have to follow, on occasion, as well as lead.If that is true of us, imagine what psychic adjustment is going on in the former Soviet Union, and especially at its core, in Russia. That proud country has slipped from being the hub of a superpower, the adjudicator of the fates of others, into a beggar role on the world scene.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | July 7, 1992
MOSCOW -- The leaders of the former republics of the Soviet Union agreed yesterday to create a peacekeeping force to try to put an end to ethnic warfare raging in several parts of the old empire.The decision to create the multi-ethnic force was reached at a meeting of the practically moribund Commonwealth of Independent States here. It was unexpected, but clearly linked to the fighting in Moldova, whose bloody conflict poses the hazard of a larger war involving Russia, Ukraine and Romania.
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