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NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | May 14, 2008
At the Air Force Student Detachment barracks at Fort Meade, almost every room contains mold. Water drips from leaky pipes into buckets on the floor. Shower water seeps down a hallway wall. Forty-seven airmen live in these half-century-old barracks, among the worst on the Army installation in western Anne Arundel County. "I think we've gone beyond the point of saying these barracks are unsuitable," said Maj. Danny S. Chung, commander of a Marine Corps detachment at Fort Meade.
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NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | March 3, 1993
Her professors at the National Academy of Art in New York said Doris Faber would never amount to anything in her field. She was, after all, a woman in the 1930s, and being an artist was man's work.So, Mrs. Faber, 75, spent 40 years proving them wrong.Her ceramic art has impressed the local art community and her works, mostly displayed at the Margaret Smith Gallery in Ellicott City, are worth from $10 to $1,000.Last year, Mrs. Faber captured awards in the Maryland Federation of Art Watercolor and Pottery Show and the River Gallery Show.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
No sooner had the city's new municipal office building opened six years ago than the elevators began to break down, walls leaked, pipes froze, ceilings fell and mold grew inside the walls.Today, dozens of workers say they are sickened by mysterious fumes, the heating system fluctuates wildly, and pigeon droppings litter an air shaft.For this building -- at 417 E. Fayette Street near City Hall -- taxpayers paid $29 million at the close of then-mayor William Donald Schaefer's administration.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
Megan Evans has loved clay for a long time. She admits it runs her life. There's always a piece to "throw," a bowl to carve or a vase to fire in the kiln. The clay never stops, never waits and always does what it wants. And, no matter how many orders she might be working on for one gallery or another, she often opens the kiln in her basement studio at home to a complete surprise. Much like Forrest Gump's adage about life and a box of chocolates, with clay, you never know what you're gonna get. Despite the hard work, Evans is in heaven lately.
NEWS
October 17, 2000
MOST PARENTS would say the only mold in a school should be the green-black furry stuff growing in petri dishes. But the combination of aging school buildings and exceptionally wet weather has created a bumper crop of fungi in a number of Harford and Baltimore county schools. Concerns about this mold should not be dismissed as hysterical overreaction. In large quantities, common molds like clasporidium and penicillium can trigger allergic reactions, sinus infections, headaches, coughing and irritation of the eyes and throat.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | February 3, 2002
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Florida's insurance market is feeling the effects of the black mold that infested a Texas mansion and spawned a $32 million judgment against an insurance company there. Toxic mold - which can grow in damp homes and sicken occupants - poses a rare hazard to homeowners and a growing threat to insurers. The scariest stories come from Texas and California, with tales of toxic mold making infants vomit blood and healthy adults suddenly unable to remember simple things.
NEWS
By KATRINA ALTERSITZ and KATRINA ALTERSITZ,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - Jack Pykosh, 8, has endured multiple antibiotics, CAT scans and the removal of his adenoids in an attempt to alleviate his chronic sinusitis and allergies to pollen and mold. Jack's father, Paul Pykosh, has resorted to ultraviolet lights lights to kill bacteria, cleaning vents, dehumidifiers and expensive filters in his house. This summer, it all seemed to be working. But when Jack returned to DuFief Elementary School in Gaithersburg this fall, his congestion worsened. Pykosh thinks it has something to do with the mold problem at his son's school.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
A distinct and disagreeable life form is quietly colonizing Maryland's rain-soaked homes and businesses. It's mold. The ubiquitous fungus -- distinctly different from plants and animals -- sends out tiny, unseen spores that permeate the air and give mold its unique ability to survive and spread. The mold that appears as a harmless speck on a leaky faucet or under a basement water heater will soon eat away at walls, floors, foundations and other surfaces if left unchecked. "Mold is a very resilient organism," said Lance Fisher, general manager of the Salisbury office of Marcor Remediation Inc., a Hunt Valley-based firm that removes mold and other environmental messes from businesses and homes across the nation.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2000
Black, fuzzy mold is taking over Edgewood Middle School and making pupils sick, parents say. They are demanding that Harford County school officials address a problem that they maintain has existed for several years. In response, administrators have scheduled a meeting at 7 o'clock tonight at the school on Willoughby Beach Road to discuss concerns. "We know we have a serious problem," said schools spokesman Donald R. Morrison. "It's not an ideal condition." After fielding complaints from frustrated parents in recent weeks, officials promised this week to install dehumidifiers, begin a cleanup and get an estimate on repairs for an aging air-conditioning system, which is thought to be causing the problem.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2004
A West Baltimore elementary school will be closed today amid complaints that a leaking roof is causing mold problems. Officials offered different explanations for why Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary will not be open. Vanessa Pyatt, a school system spokeswoman, said the 400-pupil school will be closed so the library's leaky roof can be sealed off. But officials based at the school said the building is being closed so that city health officials can investigate whether mold in the library has spread throughout the building through air ducts.
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