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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
No sooner had the city's new municipal office building opened six years ago than the elevators began to break down, walls leaked, pipes froze, ceilings fell and mold grew inside the walls.Today, dozens of workers say they are sickened by mysterious fumes, the heating system fluctuates wildly, and pigeon droppings litter an air shaft.For this building -- at 417 E. Fayette Street near City Hall -- taxpayers paid $29 million at the close of then-mayor William Donald Schaefer's administration.
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NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
Megan Evans has loved clay for a long time. She admits it runs her life. There's always a piece to "throw," a bowl to carve or a vase to fire in the kiln. The clay never stops, never waits and always does what it wants. And, no matter how many orders she might be working on for one gallery or another, she often opens the kiln in her basement studio at home to a complete surprise. Much like Forrest Gump's adage about life and a box of chocolates, with clay, you never know what you're gonna get. Despite the hard work, Evans is in heaven lately.
NEWS
October 17, 2000
MOST PARENTS would say the only mold in a school should be the green-black furry stuff growing in petri dishes. But the combination of aging school buildings and exceptionally wet weather has created a bumper crop of fungi in a number of Harford and Baltimore county schools. Concerns about this mold should not be dismissed as hysterical overreaction. In large quantities, common molds like clasporidium and penicillium can trigger allergic reactions, sinus infections, headaches, coughing and irritation of the eyes and throat.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | February 3, 2002
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Florida's insurance market is feeling the effects of the black mold that infested a Texas mansion and spawned a $32 million judgment against an insurance company there. Toxic mold - which can grow in damp homes and sicken occupants - poses a rare hazard to homeowners and a growing threat to insurers. The scariest stories come from Texas and California, with tales of toxic mold making infants vomit blood and healthy adults suddenly unable to remember simple things.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
A distinct and disagreeable life form is quietly colonizing Maryland's rain-soaked homes and businesses. It's mold. The ubiquitous fungus -- distinctly different from plants and animals -- sends out tiny, unseen spores that permeate the air and give mold its unique ability to survive and spread. The mold that appears as a harmless speck on a leaky faucet or under a basement water heater will soon eat away at walls, floors, foundations and other surfaces if left unchecked. "Mold is a very resilient organism," said Lance Fisher, general manager of the Salisbury office of Marcor Remediation Inc., a Hunt Valley-based firm that removes mold and other environmental messes from businesses and homes across the nation.
NEWS
By KATRINA ALTERSITZ and KATRINA ALTERSITZ,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - Jack Pykosh, 8, has endured multiple antibiotics, CAT scans and the removal of his adenoids in an attempt to alleviate his chronic sinusitis and allergies to pollen and mold. Jack's father, Paul Pykosh, has resorted to ultraviolet lights lights to kill bacteria, cleaning vents, dehumidifiers and expensive filters in his house. This summer, it all seemed to be working. But when Jack returned to DuFief Elementary School in Gaithersburg this fall, his congestion worsened. Pykosh thinks it has something to do with the mold problem at his son's school.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2001
Some pupils at Maree Garnett Farring Elementary School worked outside the building yesterday to protest the presence of mold and other conditions they say make them sick. Parents of the 35 pupils, who conducted classes on concrete outside the school, said the principal told them their children would not be counted as absent because they were supervised and completed their assignments. Parents also said the children were not allowed to use the school's bathrooms. About 500 pupils attend the school on Pontiac Avenue in the Brooklyn section of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Katrina Altersitz and Katrina Altersitz,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 2005
When Beth Murphy moved back to Maryland, she thought she had left behind her mold-fighting days in the now-clean elementary school at her old neighborhood in Weston, Fla. Then she walked into Oak Hill Elementary in Severna Park, and her nose, eyes and ears told her she was wrong. There is a musty smell throughout the school and there are ceiling tiles bowed out, apparently from moisture, Murphy said. Teachers told her they popped allergy medicine throughout the school year and used plastic-coated paperclips because metal clips rust.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2003
Tenants at a Savage apartment complex say the landlord and Howard County authorities have failed to adequately address substandard living conditions in some of the units at River Island Apartments, including the documented presence of a toxic mold. Although county health and inspection officials say the problem has been resolved, a Howard state senator and the mother of a former tenant - who has become an unofficial advocate for residents - maintain that conditions at the complex are deplorable.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2000
Taking advantage of a two-day pupil holiday, work crews tackled the musty job of mold removal at Severn Elementary School yesterday. Although the oldest parts of Severn Elementary date to 1932, it's the newest wing of the school - built in 1988 - that had the mold problem, blamed on the rain and high humidity of late summer. Students across Anne Arundel County were off yesterday and today for scheduled teacher-training activities. Severn's teachers were sent to Meade Heights Elementary for their meetings.
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