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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ruled that a lawsuit over mold in one of the ritzy Harborview condos can proceed to trial. Paul C. Clark, who bought a penthouse at the Inner Harbor complex for more than $1.1 million in 2009, is suing Zalco Realty and the 100 Harborview Drive Council of Unit Owners for $5 million. He contends that the defendants knew of water and mold problems before his purchase but issued him a "resale certification" that stated they were aware of no building or health code violations.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Caroline Chavasse stood before a room of fidgeting young bodies and wandering eyes and made a tearful plea for her livelihood. The fate of the 51-year-old rested with this group of 40 youngsters who, with a check of a "yes" or "no" box, would decide whether she would be able to pay her mortgage for the next year. "I really do want to come back," Chavasse, a mother of two, told the students of the Arts & Ideas Sudbury School. "This is the best job I've ever had. I love being with you and seeing you grow.
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NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
A $5 million lawsuit brought by a Baltimore penthouse condo owner over mold in his unit was recently dismissed by a Baltimore Circuit Court judge in favor of the waterfront property's condo association. The condo owner, Paul G. Clark, bought a penthouse unit at auction at the HarborView off Key Highway for $1.15 million in 2009. He later sued the condo association and property manager, Zalco Realty Inc., at the 27-story building over a water leak that he claimed damaged his unit and caused mold.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 4, 2014
Inevitably, considering the absence of a clear Republican frontrunner for the 2016 presidential election, the name of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush of the Bush family dynasty has been rushed to the fore. On his record in office and his soft-spoken personal appeal, he would seem a natural to go to the head of a list of only moderately impressive wannabes. But the immediate question is: Do American voters, after a double dose of Bushes, want another one? The fact is that memories of the two George Bush presidencies now set few GOP hearts aflutter.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
The Massachusetts pharmacy at the heart of a probe into a deadly meningitis outbreak may have violated federal health laws, U.S. Food and Drug Administration investigators said Friday, saying mold and bacteria were found in areas where drugs were mixed. Cases of fungal meningitis have reached 28 states, including Maryland, where 19 people have been sickened and one has died. The report came as Maryland health officials criticized the oversight of "compounding" facilities like the one in Massachusetts, which make specialized drugs.
NEWS
By Murray Saltzman | November 3, 1990
THE RABBIS tell us that when God wanted to make man he made a single mold, Adam. Then after Adam was fashioned the mold was destroyed. Hence every human life is unique. Every human spirit is wondrously special and sublime. What greater testimony exists to this Jewishly exalted perspective of our humanity than Leonard Bernstein.He was a Joseph wearing a coat of many colors. His dreams were often as self-centered as were Joseph's. When he was on stage he was the center of the universe. Every gesture and every movement of his head was invested with an intensity that made the music he conducted effervescent with drama and tension.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2010
A city panel dismissed citations for mold at a luxury Inner Harbor high-rise this summer after inquiries from a city councilwoman who lives there. A penthouse resident at the Harborview says Councilwoman Rochelle "Rikki" Spector contacted city officials out of concern that enforcement action would hurt property values at the 27-story building. Paul C. Clark says leaks and mold have forced his family out of the penthouse they bought last year for $1.15 million. Spector, who lives at the Harborview with her boyfriend despite representing a district in Northwest Baltimore, says she called city officials about the case, but did not ask them to drop the citations proposed by the Health Department.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2002
Too much of certain kinds of mold can be dangerous to homeowners' health, the American Society of Home Inspectors warns. "Mold always indicates excessive moisture. and the source should be corrected immediately," said Mike Casey, ASHI president. Toxic or pathogenic mold can cause problems including congestion, chronic fatigue, bloody noses and flulike symptoms. Homeowners can prevent mold with the following steps: Fix leaky plumbing, roof leaks or other sources of water immediately.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | October 13, 1991
Pupils, parents and staff at North Harford Elementary School say they are sick of air-quality problems that have caused mold to grow, children to choke and walls to cry."Teachers, students, guinea pigs have had enough," Verna Preis, a North Harford teacher told the County Council, sitting as the Board of Health on Tuesday. "I want the airconditioning -- or should I say the mold-, mildew-, humidity-making machine -- removed."She complained that "23 pieces of tape can't hold a thin chart tothe wall during air-conditioning periods" at the Pylesville school.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
Problems with mold and gnats at Maree Garnett Farring Elementary School are being addressed, and an environmental study will be conducted there, said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, the city's health commissioner. Parents who kept their children out of the school in the Brooklyn section of the city last week because they said the mold had given the pupils headaches and caused fatigue welcomed the move. "We've recommended an environmental study of the school within the next 10 days," Beilenson said.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
With its first two games, the Division III national champion Salisbury women's lacrosse team picked up where it left off, extending its winning streak to 25 games. The No. 1 Sea Gulls won their opener, 17-2, over Roanoke and then needed a jolt from veteran goalie Ashton Wheatley to eke out a road win at No. 19 Stevenson, 8-6, on  Saturday. "We're still trying to find our identity for this team,” Sea Gulls coach Jim Nestor said, “because I think defensively we're where we were last year.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | January 30, 2014
The Ravens hired one of the best offensive minds in the NFL as Gary Kubiak was named the team's offensive coordinator , but don't expect miracles in the 2014 season. Kubiak has put together some prolific offenses during his 21-year coaching career, but the Ravens don't have all the pieces in place for the type of highly efficient offense he wants to run. It's not just finding star players, but putting together a scheme, terminology and working out other nuances for an offense which has West Coast principles.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | October 28, 2013
The cold months can be a tough time for those with allergies, especially those sensitive to mold and dust. “During the winter, families spend more time indoors, exposing allergic individuals to allergens and irritants like dust mites, pet dander, smoke, household sprays and chemicals, and gas fumes - any of which can make their lives miserable,” said Dr. William Reisacher, director of The Allergy Center at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell...
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Mold has closed a child care center at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a floor of the McKeldin Library at the University of Maryland, College Park. The UMBC child care facility, operated by the Y of Central Maryland, shuttered Wednesday night because of a mold problem caused by water leaking between walls, officials said, leaving dozens of families without child care. "We arrived at the decision to close with the safety of the children in mind, and we are very sorry for the impact it will have on the families affected," Lynne Schaefer, vice president for finance and administration, said in an email to the university community Thursday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
John Franzone Jr., founder of a Hunt Valley plastics manufacturing company who combined his love of the outdoors with flying, died July 19 of heart failure at his Timonium home. He was 93. The son of parents from Italy and Scotland, John Franzone Jr. was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and later moved with his family to Fort Montgomery in upstate New York. It was while living there near Bear Mountain that Mr. Franzone began his lifelong passion for the outdoors as he roamed the fields and woods fishing and hunting.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Bus drivers and aides employed by a Baltimore schools contractor say that unsafe conditions such as fires and mold spores are endangering lives and unfair wages are threatening their livelihoods. The grievances were aired Thursday at a rally of employees of Durham School Services, a national company that transports children in more than 350 school districts. Since 2002, the city has contracted with Durham, which earned an estimated $15.5 million over the last three school years. The company's buses transport about 928 students.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2004
Audrey R. Patton of Jeannette, Pa., is seeking a crab mold, which "has crab meat, Campbell's tomato soup, Knox gelatin and celery." Verna Kushel of Baltimore responded with a recipe that she says "my daughter, Barbara Janofsky, served at a party." Crab Mold Serves 8 to 10 as an appetizer 1 package unflavored Knox gelatin 8 ounces cream cheese 1 medium onion, finely chopped 1 1/2 cups finely chopped celery 4 ounces to 6 ounces crab meat, picked over 1 cup mayonnaise 1 can tomato soup Soak gelatin in 1/4 cup water, according to the package directions.
NEWS
September 28, 2006
A Circuit Court jury awarded $375,000 yesterday to three city residents who had sued the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, alleging that mold in their apartment building on Homewood Avenue created an unsafe living environment, according to court documents and their attorney. The lawsuit, filed in February 2005, said that the apartments in a converted schoolhouse in the East Baltimore-Midway neighborhood had water leaks, standing water and mold since the late 1990s. The suit sought $3.2 million for residents Louise Bills, Mary Roy and Johnnie Pratt.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2013
The first winter after Danielle Smith bought her house in North Baltimore, the 35-year-old schoolteacher wondered if it even had a furnace, it was so cold and drafty. Now, with almost all new windows and several other energy-efficiency retrofits, Smith said, her four-bedroom single-story home in the mid-Govans neighborhood is cozier, less costly to heat — and apparently healthier for her 8-year-old son, Akil. "You can feel the difference," she said, as her son played on the carpeted living room floor at her feet.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
The Massachusetts pharmacy at the heart of a probe into a deadly meningitis outbreak may have violated federal health laws, U.S. Food and Drug Administration investigators said Friday, saying mold and bacteria were found in areas where drugs were mixed. Cases of fungal meningitis have reached 28 states, including Maryland, where 19 people have been sickened and one has died. The report came as Maryland health officials criticized the oversight of "compounding" facilities like the one in Massachusetts, which make specialized drugs.
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