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By Michael Dresser | February 5, 2010
State roads have been drenched in ice-melting chemicals, and as today dawns, the workers who operate Maryland's snowplows should have had a good night's rest to prepare for a sleep-deprived weekend. By late morning, the plows should be in position to jump into action if and when the flakes - 18 to 24 inches, if you believe forecasters - begin to fall. State Highway Administration spokeswoman Valerie Burnette Edgar said road crews in most of the state spent Thursday applying salt brine intended to slow freezing on the roads.
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By Michael Dresser | February 5, 2010
State roads have been drenched in ice-melting chemicals, and as today dawns, the workers who operate Maryland's snowplows should have had a good night's rest to prepare for a sleep-deprived weekend. By late morning, the plows should be in position to jump into action if and when the flakes - 18 to 24 inches, if you believe forecasters - begin to fall. State Highway Administration spokeswoman Valerie Burnette Edgar said road crews in most of the state spent Thursday applying salt brine intended to slow freezing on the roads.
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By Michael Dresser | michael.dresser@baltsun.com | November 24, 2009
A thick, viscous fluid that is made from sugar beets, looks and feels like motor oil and smells a bit like instant coffee is part of the State Highway Administration's plans to keep Maryland roadways free of snow and ice this winter. The molasses-based substance, known as Ice Bite, will be used in a pilot project in Frederick and Howard counties to test its effectiveness in pre-treating highways before spraying salt. Highway officials at the agency's annual Snow Show on Monday said the product will be added to salt brine to help it adhere to pavement for a longer period.
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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | November 24, 2009
A thick, viscous fluid that is made from sugar beets, looks and feels like motor oil and smells a bit like instant coffee is part of the State Highway Administration's plans to keep Maryland roadways free of snow and ice this winter. The molasses-based substance, known as Ice Bite, will be used in a pilot project in Frederick and Howard counties to test its effectiveness in pre-treating highways before spraying salt. Highway officials at the agency's annual Snow Show on Monday said the product will be added to salt brine to help it adhere to pavement for a longer period.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 6, 2008
I have been hitting the bottle again - the molasses bottle. This time things got saucy. Readers might remember that, in keeping with my New Year's resolution to eat better cake, I grabbed the molasses a few weeks ago and made a terrific gingerbread cake. Only a few days ago my wife and I made that cake again, twice. She baked one version, I made the other. Her cake turned out a little better than mine, which sank in its middle. But neither of them overflowed our square cake pan, a problem some readers have reported experiencing.
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By ROB KASPER | January 9, 2008
Every January, I regularly confront a list of things I "should" be doing over the next 12 months. Among the suggested "shoulds" recently aimed in my direction have been exercising more, eating a better breakfast and rotating my tires. I am not opposed to any of these prescriptions, although there seem to be several schools of thought on which direction -- front to back or on the diagonal -- that the tires should move. In prior new years, I have started off walking the road to reform, only to wander in a more interesting direction by St. Patrick's Day. So I began 2008 by shooting for more hedonistic goals.
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November 14, 1990
Anthony Dias and Kathryn K. Blue say this basic turkey recipe has served their family well for years; they include it in their book "Thanksgiving Dinner." The glaze flavors the skin and gives the bird a very dark mahogany color, he says. Another tip from Mr. Blue: If you're a stuffing fanatic, make two flavors and put one in the bird's neck cavity and one in the body cavity.For this recipe, you'll need poultry skewers, a large roasting pan with a rack and a pastry brush.Turkey with molasses glazeServes 12, with leftovers.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2008
Ann Sillitto of Winchester, Va., was looking for a recipe for Molasses Fruit Bars with raisins. She says that they are a favorite of her 91-year-old mother and she wanted to make them as a treat for her. I found an easy recipe for the bars on a recipe-sharing Web site called Recipelink.com. It was adapted from the Brer Rabbit Book of Molasses, first printed in 1956. The recipe does not specify a pan size. I tested it using an 8-by-8 inch baking pan. It was ready in 25 minutes. Naturally, the cooking time will vary according to pan size.
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
"I want a recipe for a cookie made with a cake mix, something quick and tasty for lunch boxes and snacks," wrote Mrs. H. Hefner of Baltimore.Responses poured in, and tester Laura Reiley chose the Duncan Hines peanut butter cookies sent in by Shelley Silver of Baltimore.Josephine C. Elsen of Wheaton, Ill., requested a recipe for Genessee chocolate -- "a rich fudge that has some molasses in it." The chosen response came from Gail Jones of Bend, Ore., who found the recipe "in the 'American Heritage Cookbook.
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By Tina Danze and Tina Danze,Universal Press Syndicate | February 15, 1995
Old-fashioned Southerners know few things are slower than molasses in winter. They also know that no matter how long it takes, pouring that molasses is worth the wait.The dark, sugar-cane syrup imparts a deep, homey flavor -- as well as a shot of sweetness -- to baked goods, meats and other dishes.One whiff of an open jar of molasses might turn off the uninitiated -- the sweetener bears a strong, almost smoky odor. But molasses wins over even skeptics once they sample its flavor in gingerbread, pork loin, chicken, muffins or baked beans.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2008
Ann Sillitto of Winchester, Va., was looking for a recipe for Molasses Fruit Bars with raisins. She says that they are a favorite of her 91-year-old mother and she wanted to make them as a treat for her. I found an easy recipe for the bars on a recipe-sharing Web site called Recipelink.com. It was adapted from the Brer Rabbit Book of Molasses, first printed in 1956. The recipe does not specify a pan size. I tested it using an 8-by-8 inch baking pan. It was ready in 25 minutes. Naturally, the cooking time will vary according to pan size.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | September 9, 2008
After Sunday, the Ravens had one more win in September than the Orioles. Call me an optimist, but I think the Orioles will eventually pass the Ravens for victories this month. Though I wouldn't bet the bar on it. We have a new drink at the bar this week: The Flat-footed Flacco. Whiskey, rum, Mountain Dew and a dab of molasses. It goes down slow, but effectively packs a punch. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/cornersportsbar)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | March 19, 2008
One of the pleasures of writing about food and drink is the reaction it evokes. You take a stand in favor of molasses and readers respond, calling and sending e-mails. In some instances, they communicate using that almost extinct form of correspondence, a letter. I got one of those recently. Not only was it a personal letter, it was typed. The typewriter, I learned later, is an Underwood No. 3 and is 95 years old. The typist, M.V. Runkles III, is 69 years old and is still practicing the skills he picked up in a typing class in the mid-1950s at Mount Airy High School.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 6, 2008
I have been hitting the bottle again - the molasses bottle. This time things got saucy. Readers might remember that, in keeping with my New Year's resolution to eat better cake, I grabbed the molasses a few weeks ago and made a terrific gingerbread cake. Only a few days ago my wife and I made that cake again, twice. She baked one version, I made the other. Her cake turned out a little better than mine, which sank in its middle. But neither of them overflowed our square cake pan, a problem some readers have reported experiencing.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 9, 2008
Every January, I regularly confront a list of things I "should" be doing over the next 12 months. Among the suggested "shoulds" recently aimed in my direction have been exercising more, eating a better breakfast and rotating my tires. I am not opposed to any of these prescriptions, although there seem to be several schools of thought on which direction -- front to back or on the diagonal -- that the tires should move. In prior new years, I have started off walking the road to reform, only to wander in a more interesting direction by St. Patrick's Day. So I began 2008 by shooting for more hedonistic goals.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 5, 2007
I am a fan of fruitcake. I used to make my own -- a process that required a lot of nuts, a lot of candied lemon peel, a sizable amount of molasses, and brandy. As a result, I have a healthy regard for real fruitcake, and virtually no tolerance for would-be comedians who think they are so clever when they recite the line about fruitcake making a good doorstop, or how there is really only one fruitcake that gets passed from home to home. Berger's Bakery Address --Lexington Market, 400 W. Lexington St. Phone --410-727-3685 Hours --6 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday Brightly wrapped in red and green ribbons, this long, blond loaf, $3.99, was chewy and mild.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 27, 2000
Several weeks ago at a summer buffet, I was dazzled by a roasted fillet of salmon that was part of the main-course offerings. Served whole, the fish had a rich, golden brown exterior and light, juicy flesh beneath. After a few bites, I found one of the hosts and asked how the salmon had been prepared. "Oh, we just brushed the fillet with soy sauce and then cooked it," she quickly replied before rushing to attend to other entertaining tasks. Days later, I decided to try the technique myself, but when I telephoned to ask if any other ingredients had been used I learned that my friends were out of town.
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