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Mojave Desert

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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 22, 2002
FORT IRWIN, Calif. -- It was not long ago that Army Col. Abe Turner would look to a rumpled paper map and a hand-held FM radio to get a fix on an enemy's location. Now he looks to his laptop computer, where the enemy glides across the screen, red icons on a glowing green relief map, updated every few minutes. "The system we have now is so much better at painting a picture of what is out there," said Turner, an assistant operations commander with the 82nd Airborne Division, as he sat outside his field tent.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
Paul Pfeiffer, a firefighter for 13 years, remembers when the towers fell nine years ago. Recalling Sept. 11, 2001, the Australian resident said, "I felt homesick on that day more than any other. " For the first time since the attacks, Pfeiffer, who grew up in Ellicott City and La Plata, has returned to the states to run in the Tour of Duty journey, along with other Australian and U.S. firefighters to honor the first responders who served that day. "We want people to remember.
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NEWS
By Frank Clifford and Frank Clifford,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 1997
CADIZ, Calif. -- In this scorched outback of wiry creosote bushes and alkaline lake beds, the tracks of Gen. George S. Patton's army are still imprinted in the sand half a century after the tanks left. On the south side of Sheep Hole Pass, hundreds of empty shacks sag and creak in the wind, ghostly reminders of the Mojave's ability to dash the dreams it inspires.But planeloads of prospective investors, politicians, hydrologists and crop specialists fly in regularly to gaze over this parched basin as if it were the promised land.
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | March 23, 2008
A writer's ideas are his legacy. After he dies, it's up to executors, heirs, lawyers, agents and colleagues to keep them alive -- and perhaps especially up to us, the readers, to thread those ideas through the weave of history, the passage of time, our own lives. Writers are the most potent of ghosts. Their spirits lodge in our quotidian decisions; we turn to them in times of change and times of terror. When their wisdom is unavailable, our choices get harder. Aldous Huxley -- born in England in 1894, visionary author of 11 novels (most famously Brave New World, in 1932)
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | September 20, 2005
Bethesda-based American Capital Strategies Ltd. announced yesterday that it has purchased Soil Safe Holdings Inc., a Columbia-based soil-treatment company, from parent company The Halifax Group for $147 million. Soil Safe, a mid-sized soil-treatment company, handles nonhazardous, polluted soil and has about 85 employees. "We are excited to partner with a business that has a way of dealing with lightly contaminated soils," said David E. Steinglass, American Capital's managing director.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
Paul Pfeiffer, a firefighter for 13 years, remembers when the towers fell nine years ago. Recalling Sept. 11, 2001, the Australian resident said, "I felt homesick on that day more than any other. " For the first time since the attacks, Pfeiffer, who grew up in Ellicott City and La Plata, has returned to the states to run in the Tour of Duty journey, along with other Australian and U.S. firefighters to honor the first responders who served that day. "We want people to remember.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 30, 1997
ONTARIO, Calif. -- There's a salamander by the mud bank, a Mexican bat in the trees and a sale at the Burlington Coat Factory.At California's newest mega-mall, retail meets the outdoors. The American Wilderness Experience, a man-made animal preserve featuring 70 species in a $12 million setting, is the latest attempt to make a mini-theme park out of a plain old shopping complex.When the attraction opens tomorrow in Ontario Mills, 40 miles east of Los Angeles, visitors who come to shop also will be able to wander through the Mojave Desert, watch a bobcat, pet a starfish, dive through a (simulated)
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | March 23, 2008
A writer's ideas are his legacy. After he dies, it's up to executors, heirs, lawyers, agents and colleagues to keep them alive -- and perhaps especially up to us, the readers, to thread those ideas through the weave of history, the passage of time, our own lives. Writers are the most potent of ghosts. Their spirits lodge in our quotidian decisions; we turn to them in times of change and times of terror. When their wisdom is unavailable, our choices get harder. Aldous Huxley -- born in England in 1894, visionary author of 11 novels (most famously Brave New World, in 1932)
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 14, 1995
Las Vegas -- Liberace. You know who I mean. Mr. Showmanship, bedecked in diamonds and furs, smiling to the crowd as he banged out some stripped-down, saccharine rendition of Tchaikovsky.Tuesday would have been the 76th birthday for the man from West Allis, Wis. He died in 1987 at his home in Palm Springs, Calif.I'll admit I've been fascinated by Liberace, and amused. Why else would I make a one-day, 360-mile round trip across the Mojave Desert -- Victorville, Calif., to Las Vegas and back?
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 1996
KELSO, Calif. -- The Mojave National Preserve is just that: 1.4 million acres that are a preserve, not at all the same as a national park.Here among the desert tortoises, Joshua trees and cacti, you can shoot and kill the coyotes and rabbits. You can pitch your tent next to men dressed in hunter's orange and watch them gut a deer. Cowhands herd cattle into stick corrals. People drive on 1,430 miles of trails."If it has two tracks and looks like a road," says Kirsten Talken, a park service ranger, "you can probably drive on it."
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | September 20, 2005
Bethesda-based American Capital Strategies Ltd. announced yesterday that it has purchased Soil Safe Holdings Inc., a Columbia-based soil-treatment company, from parent company The Halifax Group for $147 million. Soil Safe, a mid-sized soil-treatment company, handles nonhazardous, polluted soil and has about 85 employees. "We are excited to partner with a business that has a way of dealing with lightly contaminated soils," said David E. Steinglass, American Capital's managing director.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 22, 2002
FORT IRWIN, Calif. -- It was not long ago that Army Col. Abe Turner would look to a rumpled paper map and a hand-held FM radio to get a fix on an enemy's location. Now he looks to his laptop computer, where the enemy glides across the screen, red icons on a glowing green relief map, updated every few minutes. "The system we have now is so much better at painting a picture of what is out there," said Turner, an assistant operations commander with the 82nd Airborne Division, as he sat outside his field tent.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 30, 1997
ONTARIO, Calif. -- There's a salamander by the mud bank, a Mexican bat in the trees and a sale at the Burlington Coat Factory.At California's newest mega-mall, retail meets the outdoors. The American Wilderness Experience, a man-made animal preserve featuring 70 species in a $12 million setting, is the latest attempt to make a mini-theme park out of a plain old shopping complex.When the attraction opens tomorrow in Ontario Mills, 40 miles east of Los Angeles, visitors who come to shop also will be able to wander through the Mojave Desert, watch a bobcat, pet a starfish, dive through a (simulated)
NEWS
By Frank Clifford and Frank Clifford,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 1997
CADIZ, Calif. -- In this scorched outback of wiry creosote bushes and alkaline lake beds, the tracks of Gen. George S. Patton's army are still imprinted in the sand half a century after the tanks left. On the south side of Sheep Hole Pass, hundreds of empty shacks sag and creak in the wind, ghostly reminders of the Mojave's ability to dash the dreams it inspires.But planeloads of prospective investors, politicians, hydrologists and crop specialists fly in regularly to gaze over this parched basin as if it were the promised land.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 1996
KELSO, Calif. -- The Mojave National Preserve is just that: 1.4 million acres that are a preserve, not at all the same as a national park.Here among the desert tortoises, Joshua trees and cacti, you can shoot and kill the coyotes and rabbits. You can pitch your tent next to men dressed in hunter's orange and watch them gut a deer. Cowhands herd cattle into stick corrals. People drive on 1,430 miles of trails."If it has two tracks and looks like a road," says Kirsten Talken, a park service ranger, "you can probably drive on it."
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 14, 1995
Las Vegas -- Liberace. You know who I mean. Mr. Showmanship, bedecked in diamonds and furs, smiling to the crowd as he banged out some stripped-down, saccharine rendition of Tchaikovsky.Tuesday would have been the 76th birthday for the man from West Allis, Wis. He died in 1987 at his home in Palm Springs, Calif.I'll admit I've been fascinated by Liberace, and amused. Why else would I make a one-day, 360-mile round trip across the Mojave Desert -- Victorville, Calif., to Las Vegas and back?
FEATURES
August 12, 1999
Today in history: Aug. 12In 1898, the peace protocol ending the Spanish-American War was signed. Hawaii was formally annexed to the United States.In 1944, Joseph P. Kennedy Jr., eldest son of Joseph and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, was killed with his co-pilot when their explosives-laden Navy plane blew up over England.In 1953, the Soviet Union conducted a secret test of its first hydrogen bomb.In 1960, the first balloon satellite-the Echo One-was launched by the United States from Cape Canaveral, Fla.In 1972, the last American combat ground troops left Vietnam.
TRAVEL
By SUN STAFF | December 5, 1999
Sometimes it's the steady march of footsteps that irrevocably changes a place. Other times it's a single man with a vision and a mission who leaves big footprints.In the case of Las Vegas, it is Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel, whose legacy survives in Nevada's Mojave Desert. The renowned mobster's Flamingo Hotel, which opened in 1946, set Las Vegas on its way to becoming glitter gulch and the fastest-growing American city in the second half of the 20th century.Two events greased the wheels for Siegel's vision -- the legalization of gambling in Nevada in 1931 and the gusher of electricity that began to flow out of Hoover Dam's power plant five years later.
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