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By New York Times News Service | April 7, 1991
NAIROBI, Kenya -- In growing numbers, private practic lawyers in this one-party state have assumed the role that high-status professionals in other repressive societies have played in the fight for greater freedoms.In the Soviet Union, it was the scientists, led by Andrei D. Sakharov, who pushed against the ideological barriers; in Czechoslovakia, writers, symbolized by Vaclav Havel, illuminated the ills of the system; in Latin America, Roman Catholic priests and nuns following the doctrine of liberation theology pressed for democratization.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 27, 2002
NAIROBI, Kenya - As Kenyans head to the polls today to elect their third president in 40 years, ending the long rule of one of Africa's strongmen, about the only thing that can stop opposition leader Mwai Kibaki, 71, from winning is electoral fraud. And in Kenya's corrupt political system, that is all too possible, analysts say. Western diplomats and election observers have reported wide-scale buying of votes and other transgressions in recent days. Yesterday, the opposition alleged that pro-government police killed two of its supporters.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1998
NAIROBI, Kenya -- President Daniel arap Moi was officially declared the winner of Kenya's presidential election yesterday, giving a final term to a 20-year-old administration widely criticized for corruption and mismanagement.The announcement came after two days of unofficial counts predicting Moi's victory. The chairman of the Kenya Electoral Commission, Samuel Kivuitu, announced that Moi was leading his nearest challenger, Mwai Kibaki, a former vice president, by about 550,000 votes in official returns -- 2.4 million to 1.9 million.
NEWS
January 11, 2001
Misguided approach to drugs may explain high murder rate I was intrigued by The Sun's chart showing the city's murders and murder rate per 100,000 from 1812 to 2000 ("Fewer than 300 homicides at last," Jan. 1). The city's current population was reported as 632,681. When you look back in history for a similar population, it came about 1914. The difference is that the murder rate then was about 4.3 per 100,000 residents, as opposed to our current 48.2. The major cause for the difference is attributed to the drug trade.
NEWS
January 11, 1998
DANIEL ARAP MOI has begun a fifth term as president of Kenya, thanks to a flawed and ragged election. As a result, Mr. Moi will carry on as autocratic ruler, without recognition of legitimacy that elections normally bring.It is not all his fault.Mr. Moi runs a deplorable regime that represses opposition, tolerates corruption, fans ethnic tensions, squanders a healthy economic legacy and measurably displeases a majority of its people. His inaugural promise to bring reforms lacks credibility.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 27, 2002
NAIROBI, Kenya - As Kenyans head to the polls today to elect their third president in 40 years, ending the long rule of one of Africa's strongmen, about the only thing that can stop opposition leader Mwai Kibaki, 71, from winning is electoral fraud. And in Kenya's corrupt political system, that is all too possible, analysts say. Western diplomats and election observers have reported wide-scale buying of votes and other transgressions in recent days. Yesterday, the opposition alleged that pro-government police killed two of its supporters.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 5, 1998
Annapolis will replace its lost 19th-century commercial buildings with more historic 18th-century predecessors.In a midwinter trade, Cuban pitching star Orlando Hernandez is heading toward Miami while Cardinal Keeler was sent to Havana.UGPresident arap Moi won re-election and all's right with the world.Michigan is No. 1! So who cares?Pub Date: 1/05/98
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | November 27, 1994
Lori Gray hid her social studies book in her bedroom closet rather than take it to class: The 11-year-old, in seventh grade at Marley Middle School, was ashamed of the way it looked."
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 7, 1995
NAIROBI, Kenya -- In the first of his several professional lives, Richard Leakey helped unravel the origins of humans in east Africa. In the second, he emerged as a leading wildlife conservationist by campaigning for a global ban on ivory sales, to save African elephants from extinction.Now Mr. Leakey, a forceful 50-year-old white Kenyan, has begun a sort of third life, with the ambition of replacing Daniel arap Moi as Kenya's president -- or at least becoming the real power behind a new government.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 1996
NAIROBI, Kenya -- With an election looming next year, Kenya's opposition parties are unable to unite behind a single candidate or agree on an agenda with which to challenge President Daniel arap Moi, who has governed for 16 years.Some opposition leaders say they have given up on beating Moi under the current election system and instead are calling for a new constitution. In recent weeks, they have joined with members of the clergy in calling for a constitutional convention, threatening demonstrations to press the government to accept reforms.
NEWS
January 5, 2001
DAY IN, DAY OUT, news from Kenya's government-controlled radio is predictable and reassuring: The lead item is always about something President Daniel arap Moi did or said. In reality, Kenya is teetering on the brink of a disaster. After two years of inadequate rain, the dams are dry, crops failing. Crime is out of control. Joblessness, particularly among restless young people, is endemic. The East African country, once touted as one of the few bright spots on an otherwise dismal continent, is in permanent crisis.
NEWS
January 11, 1998
DANIEL ARAP MOI has begun a fifth term as president of Kenya, thanks to a flawed and ragged election. As a result, Mr. Moi will carry on as autocratic ruler, without recognition of legitimacy that elections normally bring.It is not all his fault.Mr. Moi runs a deplorable regime that represses opposition, tolerates corruption, fans ethnic tensions, squanders a healthy economic legacy and measurably displeases a majority of its people. His inaugural promise to bring reforms lacks credibility.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1998
NAIROBI, Kenya -- President Daniel arap Moi was officially declared the winner of Kenya's presidential election yesterday, giving a final term to a 20-year-old administration widely criticized for corruption and mismanagement.The announcement came after two days of unofficial counts predicting Moi's victory. The chairman of the Kenya Electoral Commission, Samuel Kivuitu, announced that Moi was leading his nearest challenger, Mwai Kibaki, a former vice president, by about 550,000 votes in official returns -- 2.4 million to 1.9 million.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 5, 1998
Annapolis will replace its lost 19th-century commercial buildings with more historic 18th-century predecessors.In a midwinter trade, Cuban pitching star Orlando Hernandez is heading toward Miami while Cardinal Keeler was sent to Havana.UGPresident arap Moi won re-election and all's right with the world.Michigan is No. 1! So who cares?Pub Date: 1/05/98
NEWS
By Scott Straus and Scott Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 1997
BUKHULA, Kenya -- In this lush green farming village in western Kenya, people live without electricity, piped water or phones. Three meals a day are a luxury.Basic education is increasingly an unaffordable prospect. The village schoolhouse, which parents paid for and built, is too small to shelter all the students, so some classes are taught outdoors. And this year, heavy winds blew away the roof on the nursery school.But Bukhula has democracy, and Monday its people and the rest of Kenya's electorate will take their concerns to the ballot box in this East African nation's second multiparty election.
NEWS
August 23, 1997
PRESIDENT Daniel arap Moi of Kenya is 73 years old and has been in power for 19 of them. He is entitled to an honorable retirement. Unhappily for 25 million compatriots, nothing is further from his mind.The student demonstrations and closure of universities last month, the murders around Mombasa recently, the insistent demands by opposition leaders for an end to police harassment, all ring familiar. These or similar events preceded the 1992 election, which President Moi held only because of unrest demanding it and won, barely, against divided opposition.
NEWS
By Scott Straus and Scott Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 1997
BUKHULA, Kenya -- In this lush green farming village in western Kenya, people live without electricity, piped water or phones. Three meals a day are a luxury.Basic education is increasingly an unaffordable prospect. The village schoolhouse, which parents paid for and built, is too small to shelter all the students, so some classes are taught outdoors. And this year, heavy winds blew away the roof on the nursery school.But Bukhula has democracy, and Monday its people and the rest of Kenya's electorate will take their concerns to the ballot box in this East African nation's second multiparty election.
NEWS
November 11, 1992
The international donor community acting through the IMF and World Bank can force African dictators to declare multi-party elections, but can't make them lose. Foreign pressure cannot make the playing field level. It cannot ensure that the election will even be held.President Daniel arap Moi of Kenya gave in to long and strong pressure from the United States and other donors, who withheld aid until he declared political parties legal, last December. With three quarreling opposition parties in place, he has dissolved parliament and scheduled an election for Dec. 7. If enough foreign observers pile in, the contest may be roughly fair.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 1996
NAIROBI, Kenya -- With an election looming next year, Kenya's opposition parties are unable to unite behind a single candidate or agree on an agenda with which to challenge President Daniel arap Moi, who has governed for 16 years.Some opposition leaders say they have given up on beating Moi under the current election system and instead are calling for a new constitution. In recent weeks, they have joined with members of the clergy in calling for a constitutional convention, threatening demonstrations to press the government to accept reforms.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 7, 1995
NAIROBI, Kenya -- In the first of his several professional lives, Richard Leakey helped unravel the origins of humans in east Africa. In the second, he emerged as a leading wildlife conservationist by campaigning for a global ban on ivory sales, to save African elephants from extinction.Now Mr. Leakey, a forceful 50-year-old white Kenyan, has begun a sort of third life, with the ambition of replacing Daniel arap Moi as Kenya's president -- or at least becoming the real power behind a new government.
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