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By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 15, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the Kuwaiti national who is believed to be the highest-ranking al-Qaida operative in U.S. custody, told a military tribunal in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, that he was responsible for the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, according to a transcript of last weekend's hearing. In a written statement read to the three-officer panel, Mohammed claimed he was al-Qaida chief Osama bin Laden's "operational leader" for the "9/11 Operation," responsible for the "organizing, planning, follow-up, and execution" of the plot.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 1, 2013
Swimming UMBC's Mohamed Hussein breaks Egyptian record UMBC senior Mohamed Hussein broke the Egyptian record in the 200-meter individual medley at the FINA World Championships on Wednesday in Barcelona, Spain. His time of 2 minutes, 2.29 seconds broke his record of 2:03.11, set in Olympics qualifications last year. However, his 29th-place finish out of 50 swimmers was not enough to advance him to the semifinals. He still has swims in the 50 backstroke, 400 medley relay and 800 freestyle relay remaining.
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NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the suspected planner of the Sept. 11 attacks, admitted during a military tribunal last weekend that he personally killed Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, according to a revised transcript of the hearing that confirmed long-held suspicions about his role in the slaying. The al-Qaida operative said he cut off Pearl's head after the journalist was kidnapped during a reporting trip to Pakistan in 2002. "I decapitated with my blessed right hand the head of the American Jew, Daniel Pearl, in the city of Karachi, Pakistan," he claimed in a statement delivered by a U.S. officer serving as his personal representative.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Taariq Mohammed has never had a problem keeping academics ahead of sports. The captain of River Hill High's state championship wrestling team recently entered a wrestling camp on the morning he was to discover how well he did on the ACT, the college preparatory exam. Right as camp was set to begin, the rising senior checked the online ACT score report from his cellphone. He discovered he had accomplished a feat rarely performed by ACT exam takers: He had earned the highest possible score of 36. Later, Taariq received a letter from Jon Whitmore, chief executive officer of ACT Inc., lauding his achievement.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1997
Wallace Deen Mohammed, son of the late Elijah Muhammad and leader of the 1.5 million-member Muslim American Community, came to Baltimore yesterday bringing a message of religious unity and cooperation.Mohammed, who addressed the board of directors of the Baltimore Jewish Council, condemned Islamic violence in the Middle East and made clear his divergence from Minister Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam."We are obligated as Muslims, once we know the difference to make it clear to the public that what he represents is not Islam," Mohammed said.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
The man who vies with Louis Farrakhan for the allegiance of African-American Muslims warned yesterday against black nationalism and urged his audience to work toward harmony among all races and religions.Imam W. Deen Mohammed, son of former Nation of Islam leader Elijah Mohammed, brought his message of tolerance andpersonal responsibility to a gathering of more than 300 people in West Baltimore.His 90-minute address was part of a three-day festival on the grounds of the temple Masjid Walter Omar on West North Avenue conducted to celebrate the city's ethnic diversity and to demonstrate neighborhood unity against violence and crime.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Wallace D. Mohammed, leader of the Muslim American Society and son of the late Elijah Muhammad, said yesterday it is the duty of Muslims not only to respect their Christian and Jewish brothers and sisters, but to defend them, if necessary.In a speech to about 50 religious and civic leaders, Mohammed spoke of the racial and religious reconciliation he has emphasized repeatedly since he succeeded his father in 1975 and moved the denomination toward orthodox Sunni Islam."We are to respect religion and to respect the sacredness and the sacred things of religion, and even be ourselves committed to protect these things with our own hands and our own lives," he said in the address at the Baltimore Rowing Club in Cherry Hill.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- The big horse in this year's Kentucky Derby is not Point Given, even though reporters continually describe the race favorite as colossal. No, the big horse in Saturday's race at Churchill Downs is Express Tour. The entrant of Godolphin Racing, the international stable based in the Middle East, measures 17.2 hands. Point Given measures 17 hands. Both horses weigh more than 1,200 pounds. (A hand equals 4 inches. Horses are measured from the ground to the withers, the highest point of the back.
SPORTS
December 15, 2007
BOBCATS -- Traded C Primoz Brezec and F Walter Herrmann to Pistons for C Nazr Mohammed. CLIPPERS -- Signed G Richie Frahm.
NEWS
March 18, 2007
The transcript of a secret military hearing at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, released by the Pentagon last week quoted Mohammed as claiming responsibility for planning 31 al-Qaida attacks and plots from the suicide hijackings of Sept. 11, 2001 - which killed nearly 3,000 - to a 2002 shooting on an island off Kuwait that killed a U.S. Marine. Mohammed also said he beheaded Wall Street Journal journalist Daniel Pearl in Karachi, Pakistan. ?I was responsible for the 9/11 operation from A to Z.? Khalid Sheikh Mohammed
NEWS
June 26, 2012
Mohamed Morsi, the first freely elected president in Egypt's history, is soon to take office under circumstances that are far from ideal. While Egypt's ruling military has conceded his victory over its preferred candidate in the presidential runoff election, Ahmed Shafiq, the generals who have been running the country show no sign of being ready to give up power. Last week they issued a decree stripping the president's office of its authority over the budget, national security and most domestic matters.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons and Tribune Newspapers | February 13, 2010
The Obama administration is considering "multiple options" for trying the mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, as local officials and some members of Congress resist the current Department of Justice plan for a civilian trial in New York. But administration officials are not saying whether Khalid Sheikh Mohammed could be tried before a military commission, or at the Illinois prison where they plan to move other detainees from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, or at some other unnamed site. Administration officials said last month that the White House was involved in discussions about the trial, as Congress was actively considering precluding options for trying Mohammed and the other detainees in New York.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 27, 2009
John E. Mohamed, a longtime city public school educator who had been principal of Southeast Middle School for nearly two decades, died of pneumonia Wednesday at Hanover Hall, a Hanover, Pa., rehabilitation center. The former Northwood resident was 76. The son of a merchant seaman and housekeeper, he was born in Newport News, Va. Mr. Mohamed moved with his family as a youngster to West Baltimore because of his father's sailing schedule. He was a 1952 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School, and after graduating from what is now Morgan State University with a bachelor's degree in health and life sciences in 1957, Mr. Mohamed began teaching science at Hampstead Hill Junior High School.
NEWS
December 12, 2008
Having five accused killers agree to plead guilty would be a welcome outcome in most any criminal case - convictions are in hand, prosecutors avoid a costly trial, and victims' families are assured some closure. But the United States of America vs. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed et al is not just any case. Mr. Mohammed and four others are the defendants in the only military tribunal convened since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The government's detention of them - at secret overseas prisons and at the Guantanamo Bay military base - and its prosecution of them underscore the Bush administration's perversion of American jurisprudence in the name of the war on terror.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2008
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the self-styled mastermind of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, rejected his legal team and asked to represent himself in his first public court appearance yesterday, proclaiming that he intended to plead guilty and was aware that he faced the death penalty. "Yes, this is what I wish, to be a martyr for a long time," he told a military judge at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, according to news reports. "I will, God willing, have this, by you." Nearly seven years after suicide bombers killed nearly 3,000 Americans in the worst attack on U.S. soil in history, the final stage of prosecution against him and four alleged co-conspirators finally began.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,Los Angeles Times | May 26, 2008
WASHINGTON - They make an unlikely pair, the world's most notorious captured terrorist and the Navy captain assigned to defend him against war crimes charges that could lead to his execution. But together, the two men quietly are embarking on a legal odyssey that could last years, and ultimately might help define the constitutional parameters of the United States' role in the global war on terrorism. On three occasions over the past few weeks, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the self-described orchestrator of the Sept.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
In his first news conference as leader of one of Baltimore's largest Muslim communities, Imam E. Abdul-malik Mohammed said yesterday that he wants to develop strong ties with all of the city's religious leaders while building a thriving Islamic community."
NEWS
By Newsday | May 16, 1994
From a modest, two-story bungalow in the Chicago suburb of Calumet City, Warith Deen Mohammed runs a ministry that has touched hundreds of thousands of Muslims.Although he is considered the spiritual leader of most black Americans and others who follow Orthodox Islam, his name is not widely known. And although he is the son of Elijah Muhammad, one of the founders of the Nation of Islam, he rejected his father's teachings and turned his back on the money and power that was bequeathed him.His followers say that he is a sincere, humble and deeply religious man who converted thousands of former Nation of Islam members to Orthodox Islam.
SPORTS
December 15, 2007
BOBCATS -- Traded C Primoz Brezec and F Walter Herrmann to Pistons for C Nazr Mohammed. CLIPPERS -- Signed G Richie Frahm.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,Los Angeles Times | October 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The FBI is quietly reconstructing the cases against Khalid Sheik Mohammed and 14 others accused as al-Qaida leaders being held at Guantanamo Bay, spurred in part by U.S. concerns that years of CIA interrogation have yielded evidence that is inadmissible or too controversial to present at their coming war crimes tribunals, government officials familiar with the probes said. The process is an embarrassment for the Bush administration, which for years held the men incommunicado overseas and allowed the CIA to extract information from them in coercive ways that would not be admissible in a U.S. court of law - and might not be allowed even in military commissions, some former officials and legal experts said.
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