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By Jason Song | March 23, 2003
When Mohammad Saleem moved to River Hill about eight years ago, he was worried whether he, a Muslim, would fit in. "I was surprised. It's easier to be a Muslim in suburbia," he said. Saleem, 57, grew up in Rawalpindi, a city in the northern part of Pakistan, before moving to Philadelphia in 1973 to work and to study architecture. Saleem thought he eventually would return to his native country, until he met his future wife in Philadelphia. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania, Saleem and his wife moved to Washington, where they lived for 16 years before they decided to move to Howard County.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The Tuesday sentencing of a Howard County teen convicted of terrorism offenses in Philadelphia has been postponed, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office there. Mohammad Hassan Khalid pleaded guilty to working to pursue a terrorist plot in Europe with a Pennsylvania woman who went by the name Jihad Jane and other people. Khalid mailed stolen documents, tried to raise money and translated extremist propaganda, according to federal prosecutors. His sentencing had been postponed several times and his attorney said last week he was seeking further delay so his client could undergo further psychological testing.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2000
Eight-year-old Mohammad can see in every way but with his eyes, while his father, Hashem, is blind every way but literally. While the son glories in everything his senses reveal, the father curses God for every seeming misfortune and desperately searches for ways to start his life over -- preferably without Mohammad to drag him down. Iranian director Majid Majidi's sublime "The Color of Paradise" follows these opposing souls over the course of a summer spent in the northern Iranian countryside.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
With a full math and science scholarship to the Johns Hopkins University and accolades for his writing, Howard County's Mohammad Hassan Khalid seemed ready to continue the American dream his father embarked on years ago when he brought the family from Pakistan. But instead, on Friday the 18-year-old Khalid became one of the youngest people ever convicted in federal court of conspiracy to aid terrorists. He could receive up to 15 years in prison and a $250,000 fine at his sentencing, which has not been scheduled.
NEWS
By Steven Stanek and Steven Stanek,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2008
A 33-year-old Pakistani man who was caught in Glen Burnie with $180,000 in cash that he intended to channel into a secretive finance network with links to terrorism has been sentenced to 39 months in federal prison and possible deportation, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced yesterday. Raja Ansar Mohammad, also known as Raja Mehmood, was based in New York and living in the United States illegally as part of an international money laundering scheme known as "hawala," an informal system of hand-to-hand money transfers that crisscrosses the globe and is virtually untraceable, U.S. attorney Rod. J. Rosenstein's office said.
NEWS
November 15, 2000
Middle East: Instead of the peace that leaders hoped for, the Middle East is again the setting for violence. In the past seven weeks, more than 200 Palestinians, Israelis and Israeli Arabs have died in clashes - by gunshots, bombs, hangings, stabbings and stones. Almost every day, the list of victims grows. Whatever their cause, or the circumstances of their deaths, they deserve at least to be named, and remembered as part of a conflict seemingly without end. David Biri, 19, Israeli, Sept.
FEATURES
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 5, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - By the second movie in the triple feature at Al Najoom theater, the projector had to cut through a thick cloud from the chain-smoking men killing an afternoon watching an obscure American action film. The floors were sticky from spilled soda and candy, the subtitles were in Chinese, and the Showdown in Little Tokyo picture trailed the sound by at least three seconds. For admission costing the equivalent of about 65 cents, the moviegoers, if they could bear it, could sit through all three films - Dolph Lundgren's Showdown in Little Tokyo, Demi Moore's Striptease and an Egyptian romance film.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | October 11, 2006
Mohammad Vohra, waiting with his mother, Yasmeen, to buy lamb at the small butcher's counter in the back of Sizar's Food Mart, said he's been coming to the Columbia store a couple of times a week for about seven years. He buys nearly all his groceries there, he said, but he especially relies on Sizar's for meat that is halal, or slaughtered according to Islamic law. "Everything is fresh," said Vohra, who is from Pakistan and lives in Jessup. "We don't have to worry about it." The store, opened by Mohammad and Fari Sizar in 1994, sells halal goat, lamb, chicken, beef and veal.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
QUETTA, Pakistan - On the rocky brown hill known as the Shining Mountain of the Quran, a new shipment has arrived. About 200 sacks are piled high in the bright morning sunlight, and each contains about 60 worn-out copies of Islam's holiest book. They were delivered by truck from all corners of Pakistan. Some of the Qurans will be repaired and returned to the mosques and religious schools that sent them. But most will remain here, destined for burial in one of the 30 room-sized caves or the 1,600 feet of narrow tunnels carved into the rock.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 13, 2001
QUETTA, Pakistan - For Afghan refugees on the run from bombing, starvation and the approaching winter, the price for legally entering Pakistan has finally been established: a leg, an eye, an arm or a few pints of blood. You must come by ambulance, in other words, or you won't make it more than a few hundred yards, especially now that Pakistani officials have restated their determination to keep the border closed. So, the few who make it with the blessing of the authorities tend to be like 11-year-old Saad Mohammad, who eight days earlier had his right foot blown off by a bomb blast during a morning airstrike as he walked outside his house near Kandahar.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
Mohammad Akram Bhatti, the owner of an Edgewater gas station and convenience store, died of cerebral meningitis Nov. 9 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 68 and lived in Crofton. Born in Nabah, India, he moved with his family to the Punjab province in Pakistan as a child. He earned a degree from Islamia College in Lahore, Pakistan. He worked briefly for Lever Brothers in Karachi, Pakistan. Family members said that in 1969, with only some pocket money, he immigrated to Florida, where he studied at Florida Memorial College.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
Federal prosecutors in Philadelphia unsealed an indictment Thursday charging a Howard County teenager with conspiring with a suburban Pennsylvania woman known as "Jihad Jane" to provide material support to terrorists. Mohammad Hassan Khalid, a Pakistani citizen and Maryland resident who graduated from Mount Hebron High School this year, is accused of using the Internet to recruit people and solicit funds for a violent jihadist war in South Asia and Europe. He was indicted alongside Ali Charaf Damache, a 46-year-old Algerian man living in Ireland, and allegedly acted under the direction of Colleen R. LaRose, who dubbed herself "Jihad Jane" online, according to the indictment.
NEWS
By Steven Stanek and Steven Stanek,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2008
A 33-year-old Pakistani man who was caught in Glen Burnie with $180,000 in cash that he intended to channel into a secretive finance network with links to terrorism has been sentenced to 39 months in federal prison and possible deportation, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced yesterday. Raja Ansar Mohammad, also known as Raja Mehmood, was based in New York and living in the United States illegally as part of an international money laundering scheme known as "hawala," an informal system of hand-to-hand money transfers that crisscrosses the globe and is virtually untraceable, U.S. attorney Rod. J. Rosenstein's office said.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | October 11, 2006
Mohammad Vohra, waiting with his mother, Yasmeen, to buy lamb at the small butcher's counter in the back of Sizar's Food Mart, said he's been coming to the Columbia store a couple of times a week for about seven years. He buys nearly all his groceries there, he said, but he especially relies on Sizar's for meat that is halal, or slaughtered according to Islamic law. "Everything is fresh," said Vohra, who is from Pakistan and lives in Jessup. "We don't have to worry about it." The store, opened by Mohammad and Fari Sizar in 1994, sells halal goat, lamb, chicken, beef and veal.
FEATURES
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 5, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - By the second movie in the triple feature at Al Najoom theater, the projector had to cut through a thick cloud from the chain-smoking men killing an afternoon watching an obscure American action film. The floors were sticky from spilled soda and candy, the subtitles were in Chinese, and the Showdown in Little Tokyo picture trailed the sound by at least three seconds. For admission costing the equivalent of about 65 cents, the moviegoers, if they could bear it, could sit through all three films - Dolph Lundgren's Showdown in Little Tokyo, Demi Moore's Striptease and an Egyptian romance film.
NEWS
By Ray Takeyh | February 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Iranian theocracy stands on the precipice as it faces its most formidable crisis since the revolution that toppled the shah 25 years ago today. Obscured by the candidate disqualifications, resignations and boycotts in the run-up to Iran's Feb. 20 parliamentary elections is the emergence of a new reform movement made up of a younger generation of parliamentarians, dissident clerics and students. Instead of President Mohammad Khatami's patient negotiations with the right, the new generation of reformers adopted a two-pronged strategy of disengagement from the Islamic Republic's formal institutions and active confrontation with its would-be enforcers on the street.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 12, 2001
CHAMAN, Pakistan - America's efforts to convince Afghans that its bombing campaign is targeting terrorists but not the Afghan people or Islam are hopelessly lost on 32-year-old Gul Mohammad. His wife and family dropped off in Pakistan for safety, his motorcycle's front wheel pointed to the Afghan border, Mohammad revved the engine yesterday, ready to return to the Taliban regime stronghold of Kandahar to fight in a war he believes is directed against his homeland and his faith. "We don't believe what America says.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | August 10, 1991
BERLIN -- Aso Mohammad's plans to visit a friend recently in the eastern part of this city ended quickly when he got on the subway.He had no sooner sat down than three German teen-agers with crew cuts and olive-green bomber jackets came up to him, demanded that he leave the train and, when he refused, dragged him off at the next station, where they beat him up.After spending the night in the hospital for stitches and a mild concussion, Mr. Mohammad is...
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