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NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 23, 2002
IF YOU'RE LIKE most American taxpayers, you often wake up in the middle of the night in a cold sweat and ask yourself: "Am I doing enough to support mohair producers?" I am pleased to report that you are, thanks to bold action taken recently by the United States Congress (motto: "Hey, It's not our money!"). I am referring to the 2002 Farm Security Act, which recently emerged from the legislative process very much the way a steaming wad of processed vegetation emerges from the digestive tract of a cow. The purpose of the Farm Security Act is to provide farmers with price stability.
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NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD | June 10, 2007
PHINA'S LUXURY LINEN COLLECTIVE 919 S. Charles St., Federal Hill Hours: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, Monday by appointment only 410-685-0911 phinas.com Imagine slipping between silky 1,000-thread count Egyptian cotton sheets, snuggling under a fluffy down duvet or pampering yourself at home with soaps and lotions you usually would find in a spa. Phina's, which opened in February in Federal Hill, aims to make those dreams a reality. "We have things that make your home like a spa environment," says Carla Wing, the store's retail marketing director.
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NEWS
By George F. Will | October 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When in 1996 Congress ended wool and mohair subsidies, liberals said this proved they were serious about "reinventing" government, conservatives said it proved they were serious about shrinking government, and realists said the subsidies would be back. Some are back.Wool subsidies grew out of World War II, when uniforms were woolen. Worried that domestic producers could not supply enough for future wars, in 1954 Congress voted subsidies. Mohair was included because well, just because.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 23, 2002
IF YOU'RE LIKE most American taxpayers, you often wake up in the middle of the night in a cold sweat and ask yourself: "Am I doing enough to support mohair producers?" I am pleased to report that you are, thanks to bold action taken recently by the United States Congress (motto: "Hey, It's not our money!"). I am referring to the 2002 Farm Security Act, which recently emerged from the legislative process very much the way a steaming wad of processed vegetation emerges from the digestive tract of a cow. The purpose of the Farm Security Act is to provide farmers with price stability.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- It's enough to make an Angora goat breeder's hair stand on end: The Clinton administration has set its sights on the mohair subsidy.It's not a big deal as federal programs go: $48.4 million in 1991, the last year for which complete figures are available. It doesn't affect a huge constituency, just 12,000 farmers scattered across the harsher parts of the country where little but goats and sheep can thrive.But it is replete with all the passions and political difficulties engulfing various special interest groups and their representatives in Congress as they confront the Clinton list of 150 federal program cuts.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | August 31, 1993
THIS riddle brought to you by Vice President Al Gore: What do ashtrays, mohair and fruitcake have in common?If you said government waste, you're on to something. So is Mr. Gore.For the past six months, Mr. Gore has headed the National Performance Review, which intends to streamline the way the federal government does business. On Sept. 7, the vice president will release the review's findings.Using those recommendations, President Clinton is expected to send to Congress by October a bill that would do away with programs that are no longer needed and nix picayune government purchasing regulations for everything from ashtrays to fruitcake.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | September 1, 1994
Show time! Tonight kicks off this season's First Thursday, the people-meet-art monthly gallery and museum opening night tied to Charles Street's culture corridor. First Thursday's are as close as Baltimore gets to a fashion parade. The bucks and bohemia collage of gallery goers, artists and students shows a cross-section of personal style that ranges from discreetly expensive to wildly creative with some just plain dressing in between.It's an unflappable crowd, tolerant of stylish self-expression and posers.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD | June 10, 2007
PHINA'S LUXURY LINEN COLLECTIVE 919 S. Charles St., Federal Hill Hours: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, Monday by appointment only 410-685-0911 phinas.com Imagine slipping between silky 1,000-thread count Egyptian cotton sheets, snuggling under a fluffy down duvet or pampering yourself at home with soaps and lotions you usually would find in a spa. Phina's, which opened in February in Federal Hill, aims to make those dreams a reality. "We have things that make your home like a spa environment," says Carla Wing, the store's retail marketing director.
FEATURES
By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 1998
NEW YORK -- Mohair sweaters, long gray skirts and Minnie Driver. That's what the first round of fall designer collections in New York had in common.Those fuzzy, scratchy mohair concoctions that were a major theme in Europe are dominating the New York runways. So are skirts that cover much more than the knee. Gray is the most popular color, and Minnie Driver has been seated in every front row. Fortunately, she doesn't seem to mind posing endlessly for the paparazzi.Yet even with these similarities, New York's designers are showing some individuality as the fall shows, which continue through Friday, get under way.Donna Karan offered unusual fabrics and interesting cuts in an innovative collection for DKNY.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- From meat-packing to Mickey Mouse, the $500 billion spending package set for congressional passage this evening is loaded with provisions that were slipped into the legislation in the final hours of negotiations.Lawmakers eager to recess for their late-breaking election campaigns are expected to easily pass the final bill of the 105th Congress. But it has become so freighted with last-minute spending and policy changes that budget hawks and conservatives outside of Congress are beginning to turn angrily against the package.
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When in 1996 Congress ended wool and mohair subsidies, liberals said this proved they were serious about "reinventing" government, conservatives said it proved they were serious about shrinking government, and realists said the subsidies would be back. Some are back.Wool subsidies grew out of World War II, when uniforms were woolen. Worried that domestic producers could not supply enough for future wars, in 1954 Congress voted subsidies. Mohair was included because well, just because.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- From meat-packing to Mickey Mouse, the $500 billion spending package set for congressional passage this evening is loaded with provisions that were slipped into the legislation in the final hours of negotiations.Lawmakers eager to recess for their late-breaking election campaigns are expected to easily pass the final bill of the 105th Congress. But it has become so freighted with last-minute spending and policy changes that budget hawks and conservatives outside of Congress are beginning to turn angrily against the package.
FEATURES
By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 1998
NEW YORK -- Mohair sweaters, long gray skirts and Minnie Driver. That's what the first round of fall designer collections in New York had in common.Those fuzzy, scratchy mohair concoctions that were a major theme in Europe are dominating the New York runways. So are skirts that cover much more than the knee. Gray is the most popular color, and Minnie Driver has been seated in every front row. Fortunately, she doesn't seem to mind posing endlessly for the paparazzi.Yet even with these similarities, New York's designers are showing some individuality as the fall shows, which continue through Friday, get under way.Donna Karan offered unusual fabrics and interesting cuts in an innovative collection for DKNY.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | September 1, 1994
Show time! Tonight kicks off this season's First Thursday, the people-meet-art monthly gallery and museum opening night tied to Charles Street's culture corridor. First Thursday's are as close as Baltimore gets to a fashion parade. The bucks and bohemia collage of gallery goers, artists and students shows a cross-section of personal style that ranges from discreetly expensive to wildly creative with some just plain dressing in between.It's an unflappable crowd, tolerant of stylish self-expression and posers.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | August 31, 1993
THIS riddle brought to you by Vice President Al Gore: What do ashtrays, mohair and fruitcake have in common?If you said government waste, you're on to something. So is Mr. Gore.For the past six months, Mr. Gore has headed the National Performance Review, which intends to streamline the way the federal government does business. On Sept. 7, the vice president will release the review's findings.Using those recommendations, President Clinton is expected to send to Congress by October a bill that would do away with programs that are no longer needed and nix picayune government purchasing regulations for everything from ashtrays to fruitcake.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- It's enough to make an Angora goat breeder's hair stand on end: The Clinton administration has set its sights on the mohair subsidy.It's not a big deal as federal programs go: $48.4 million in 1991, the last year for which complete figures are available. It doesn't affect a huge constituency, just 12,000 farmers scattered across the harsher parts of the country where little but goats and sheep can thrive.But it is replete with all the passions and political difficulties engulfing various special interest groups and their representatives in Congress as they confront the Clinton list of 150 federal program cuts.
NEWS
January 6, 1991
Farmers who produce wool, lamb and mohair are reminded to turn in their 1990 sales receipts by Jan. 31 to avoid late payments, said Elizabeth A. Schaeffer, county executive director of the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service."
NEWS
April 15, 2001
Expert on security to discuss design, lighting of landscaping Maryland Cooperative Extension of Carroll County will offer a seminar on landscape security at 7 p.m. April 23 at the office on Smith Avenue in Westminster. Jim Emerick of Risk Management Consultants will discuss design and lighting for a home's exterior. Emerick is a former crime-prevention officer and a certified crime-prevention specialist. Participants should prepare questions pertaining to their home and grounds. The program is free, but registration is required.
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