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Mogadishu

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NEWS
January 8, 1991
It seems doubtful that President Mohammed Siad Barre, after 21 years of misrule, can withstand the final rebel assault that began Dec. 30 in Somalia. A decisive end to the fighting will be a blessing in the capital, Mogadishu, where one million souls face starvation and gunfire.Long a pawn in the cold war, Somalia collected arms from the Soviet Union, the United States, Italy and Libya, which the army and the rebel United Somali Congress have been using to slaughter each other. The long competition of the Soviet Union and the United States in East Africa ended when the superpowers began to cooperate in third countries during the Bush administration.
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NEWS
December 5, 2012
I completely agree with op-ed contributor Mark Thistel's commentary on the progress our country has made over the last century ("The not-so-good old days," Dec. 1). If our country's government and laws have become so oppressive to some people, those that feel that way should know there is an alternative. It's a Utopia where big government, taxes and gun control laws don't exist. You can walk down the middle of the street, armed to the teeth, and keep every cent you earn. This place is known as Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 8, 2006
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Islamist leaders in control of the city reportedly agreed to talks with the country's transitional government yesterday, a move some analysts said could provide the first hope of stability after 15 years of anarchy. But the streets of the capital bristled with tense, heavily armed militias on edge over any attempt at a counteroffensive by an alliance of rival warlords reportedly backed by the United States. The Bush administration has not admitted backing the alliance of warlords against the Islamists, though an analyst with the International Crisis Group, John Prendergast, said CIA backing for the warlords to the extent of $100,000 to $150,000 a month was "crystal clear."
NEWS
By Lutfi Sheriff Mohammed and Edmund Sanders and Lutfi Sheriff Mohammed and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 6, 2008
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Thousands of angry Somalis rioted yesterday over rising food prices and the collapse of the nation's currency, culminating in clashes with government troops and armed shopkeepers that killed at least five protesters, witnesses and officials said. Shops and markets throughout Mogadishu quickly closed as protesters, including many women and children, stoned storefronts and chanted slogans accusing traders of cheating them. "I've never demonstrated before, but I'm not ashamed because if you can't eat, you will do whatever you can," said Abdullahi Mohammed, 57, of Mogadishu.
NEWS
By RICHARD H.P. SIA | January 3, 1993
Mogadishu, Somalia. -- Nothing seems quite as unnerving as sitting in a pickup truck that is barreling down a dirt road toward a squad of U.S. soldiers, their M-16s and fixed machine guns aimed squarely at the windshield.But then there's little about being a foreign journalist in Somalia that isn't unnerving, if not downright scary.Stories are circulating almost daily through the city of reporters who've been roughed up and robbed, even outside the main airport gate within view of the Pakistani and American troops there.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 31, 2006
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Leaders from Somalia's capital gathered yesterday where matters of importance are often debated and settled here: under the shade of a thorny aqab tree. This one was at a bombed-out military barracks on the edge of Mogadishu, because the guest of honor, Somalian President Abdullahi Yusuf, refuses to enter a notoriously dangerous city that until two weeks ago had been under the control of an Islamic alliance. "I will come to Mogadishu once everything is in place," he said.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2007
NAIROBI, Kenya -- In some of the bloodiest fighting in months, at least 20 people were killed yesterday in Somalia's capital. The dead included seven government soldiers, some of whose bodies were dragged through the streets and set on fire, witnesses said. The gruesome scene was reminiscent of the 1993 crash of a U.S. Black Hawk helicopter in Mogadishu during an ill-fated mission that killed 18 American servicemen. The latest clashes began after government soldiers, aided by Ethiopian troops, launched an early morning raid on the outskirts of town.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. mission in what troops there call "South Moag" has changed for many: Rangers, Delta force commandos and the various intelligence agencies are no longer concentrating their search on warlord Mohamed Farah Aidid.They are looking for one of their own in the streets of south Mogadishu -- Chief Warrant Officer Michael Durant. And they are trying to find out how many of the five men who disappeared with the Berlin, N.H., helicopter pilot survived a firefight Sunday.Whatever the case may be, officials say, Mr. Aidid has ceased to be the quarry.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Abukar Albadri and Edmund Sanders and Abukar Albadri,Los Angeles Times | December 28, 2006
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Troops from Ethiopia and Somalia's weak transitional government cornered Islamic fighters yesterday in their stronghold of Mogadishu, setting the stage for a possible showdown over Somalia's seaside capital. A weeklong assault led by Ethiopia's military, which sent nearly 4,000 troops into Somalia at the request of the transitional government, has resulted in a sudden reversal of fortunes for the Islamists, who have lost nearly all the territory they had seized during the past six months.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | September 17, 1993
A love of the sea learned while growing up in Bayside Beach has given Eddie Johns a front row seat in the world's theater.Once a tugboat operator in Curtis Bay, Mr. Johns, 46, is the harbor master for the port of Mogadishu in war-ravaged Somalia.He arrived there last December as a warrant officer in the U.S. Army Reserve. That was not too long after the U.S. Marines had gone in to restore order and take food to the famine stricken populace.Since then, he has overseen the rebirth of that city's commercial center.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,Los Angeles Times | June 16, 2007
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- A string of attacks in Somalia's capital, including a suicide bombing by a motorcyclist, killed eight people and wounded 10 yesterday, the latest examples of a rising insurgency aimed at toppling the transitional government. In an apparently coordinated attack, three blasts rocked parts of Mogadishu between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. The suicide bomber rammed his motorcycle into a pickup truck of government soldiers guarding the deputy major, killing five people, including the bomber, witnesses said.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2007
NAIROBI, Kenya -- In some of the bloodiest fighting in months, at least 20 people were killed yesterday in Somalia's capital. The dead included seven government soldiers, some of whose bodies were dragged through the streets and set on fire, witnesses said. The gruesome scene was reminiscent of the 1993 crash of a U.S. Black Hawk helicopter in Mogadishu during an ill-fated mission that killed 18 American servicemen. The latest clashes began after government soldiers, aided by Ethiopian troops, launched an early morning raid on the outskirts of town.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 2007
MOGADISHU, Somalia --Somali officials said yesterday that dozens of people were killed in a U.S. airstrike on Sunday, most of them Islamist fighters fleeing in armed pickup trucks across a remote, muddy stretch of the Kenya-Somalia border. U.S. officials said al-Qaida terrorists had been the target of the strike, which they said had killed about a dozen people. But the officials acknowledged that the identities of the victims were still unknown. Several residents of the area, in the southern part of the country, said dozens of civilians had been killed, and news of the attack immediately set off new waves of anti-American anger in Mogadishu, Somalia's battle-scarred capital, where the United States has a complicated legacy.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 2, 2007
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Their leaders slipped out of this capital under the cover of darkness. The plum jobs are gone. Their former offices were the first to be looted in a spasm of vandalism last week by angry young men. Yesterday, Somali Prime Minister Ali Mohammed Gedi renewed his offer of amnesty to midlevel officials and fighters of Somalia's now-defunct Islamic Courts Union who lay down their weapons. He also issued a three-day deadline for everyone in Mogadishu to turn in their guns.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 31, 2006
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Leaders from Somalia's capital gathered yesterday where matters of importance are often debated and settled here: under the shade of a thorny aqab tree. This one was at a bombed-out military barracks on the edge of Mogadishu, because the guest of honor, Somalian President Abdullahi Yusuf, refuses to enter a notoriously dangerous city that until two weeks ago had been under the control of an Islamic alliance. "I will come to Mogadishu once everything is in place," he said.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Abukar Albadri | December 30, 2006
MOGADISHU, SOMALIA -- A day after the fall of Mogadishu, Somalia's transitional prime minister made a symbolic visit yesterday to the tense capital, where he was met with a mix of cheers and jeers. In one part of the city, thousands of supporters waved flowers and leaves at his passing convoy; in another, rioters threw stones and burned tires in protest. Prime Minister Ali Mohamed Gedi had hoped the visit would demonstrate a return to normalcy after Islamist fighters fled the city yesterday, and show that the newly emboldened government was moving quickly to take control of a battle-weary nation.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. command hopes to use the armor and infantry units now reinforcing the Somalian capital to evict heavily armed Somalian militia forces that have surrounded allied bases in downtown Mogadishu.The militia members, loyal to Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid, also control all the main roads. In the past week, they have used their positions to kill and wound American soldiers by laying mines in the roads and shelling the bases with mortars.If the mission succeeds, Pentagon officials said, the allies will no longer be pinned down in this way, and key points throughout Mogadishu's downtown will be dotted with garrisons and monitored with patrols and checkpoints.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- For a military establishment acutel conscious of its vulnerability to post-Cold War budget cutters, the landing at Mogadishu was the ultimate photo opportunity.But having finally secured an elusive spotlight, the Marines discovered that they had too much of a good thing. As Navy Seals and Marine reconnaissance teams came ashore under the glare of television lights, the spotlights and flash attachments gave away their positions, interfered with their sophisticated night-vision equipment and gave night blindness to commandos who wanted to have their eyes fully adjusted to darkness in case they were attacked from the dunes and scrub.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Abukar Albadri and Edmund Sanders and Abukar Albadri,Los Angeles Times | December 29, 2006
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Somalia's beleaguered capital fell early today to Ethiopian and Somali government troops who marched quietly into the city before dawn and took control without firing a shot. An Islamic alliance that had controlled Mogadishu and much of the country evaporated yesterday after a string of military losses, and in the security vacuum, violent looting broke out in the capital. Residents awoke this morning to find the Ethiopians and troops of Somalia's U.N.-backed transitional government taking positions.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Abukar Albadri and Edmund Sanders and Abukar Albadri,Los Angeles Times | December 28, 2006
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Troops from Ethiopia and Somalia's weak transitional government cornered Islamic fighters yesterday in their stronghold of Mogadishu, setting the stage for a possible showdown over Somalia's seaside capital. A weeklong assault led by Ethiopia's military, which sent nearly 4,000 troops into Somalia at the request of the transitional government, has resulted in a sudden reversal of fortunes for the Islamists, who have lost nearly all the territory they had seized during the past six months.
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