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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 11, 2001
Ken's been getting an eyeful for some time now: Barbie spilling out of her halter top, Barbie showing off her abs of plastic, Barbie's long legs -- inch after inch of them -- stretching from her short shorts. Monica Garcia -- a new mom, longshoreman and Orthodox Jew -- gives a succinct fashion critique: "Some of these dolls are dressed like prostitutes." Garcia hopes to give a wardrobe makeover to Barbie and her bare-midriffed friends, dressing them less like Britney Spears and more like, ah, hmm ... that's the problem right there, isn't it?
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NEWS
September 13, 2011
The hoopla of commemorations, ceremonies and speeches about 9/11 have come and gone, but each time an air traveler submits to an invasive body search that violates the Muslim custom of modesty, the soul of Osama bin Laden laughs; even though dead, he won a victory over the United States. The terrorist was so successful that 10 years later we are still living in mortal fear. We have become slaves to our mania for security, and for it we have sacrificed not only modesty, but privacy, peace of mind and, to a large extent, personal autonomy.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2005
Caryn Andrews had been in search of a dissertation topic when a member of her synagogue happened to pose a question: "Do you think religious Jews would be less likely to go for a mammogram?" Intrigued, Andrews, a doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland School of Nursing, pondered the question with her rabbi, Susan Grossman, at Beth Shalom in Columbia. "She suggested that I couldn't look at religion; I had to look at modesty," Andrews says. It was a crucial distinction in a faith where healing oneself and others is a requirement, but is often difficult because of some forms of modesty practiced in the Jewish community.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | April 14, 2010
Said it before, say it again: It's a great country, and one of its beauties is freedom of expression, freer now than ever before, and another is a general amiability that you find everywhere, the helpfulness of strangers, the pleasure of small talk. Of course it's spring and the air is brisk, and this makes for public happiness. And I've just come from Nashville and Seattle, two mightily congenial cities. The young and restless stroll the downtown honky-tonks and a sweet breeze blows, laden with flowers, and it is darned near idyllic.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 4, 2005
Many young girls feel self-conscious and awkward about their developing bodies and aren't quite sure how to dress. For some, though, finding clothes has been particularly complicated in the last few years as America's retailers copied the trashier-than-thou fashions worn by celebrities such as Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera and produced sexy styles of low-rise pants, shrunken T-shirts and flimsy camisoles. Claire Maisel, 15, a sophomore at Liberty High School in Eldersburg, groaned in exasperation when asked what types of clothing are popular among her female classmates.
NEWS
September 13, 2011
The hoopla of commemorations, ceremonies and speeches about 9/11 have come and gone, but each time an air traveler submits to an invasive body search that violates the Muslim custom of modesty, the soul of Osama bin Laden laughs; even though dead, he won a victory over the United States. The terrorist was so successful that 10 years later we are still living in mortal fear. We have become slaves to our mania for security, and for it we have sacrificed not only modesty, but privacy, peace of mind and, to a large extent, personal autonomy.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | March 16, 1999
I SUPPOSE you aren't going to let me wear a bikini this summer either," my 13-year-old daughter said. It was not so much a question as a first strike.I looked past her to the snow on the window sill. "What?" I said, confused as usual."I can't believe you still have this thing about me and two-piece bathing suits," she said, her anger rising. "Do you know my friends think you are way overprotective? They think you are so-o-o-o out of it.""Jessie," I said, "can we wait to have this fight until the snow melts?
FEATURES
By Anne-Marie Schiro and Anne-Marie Schiro,New York Times News Service | December 2, 1993
Many women may be reluctant to wear them, but sheer clothes show no signs of fading away.Sheerness abounds in the resort and holiday duds coming into )) stores now and was rife on the runways for spring.But not to worry.There are many ways to wear see-through fashions without offending modesty -- or catching a chill.Under sheer black dresses and tunics, Joan Kaner, the fashion director of Neiman Marcus, wears a black spandex exercise unitard that provides coverage but looks sleek.As an alternative, she suggests a flesh-colored bodysuit in an opaque satiny jersey.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 3, 1990
Say it ain't so, Joe!Comedic actor Joe Piscopo was one of the few bright spots in those dreadful early '80s years of "NBC's Saturday Night Live." So cable viewers would be justified in looking forward to tonight's "HBO Comedy Hour: Joe Piscopo In Concert" special (at 10 on the premium service, with repeats Nov. 6, 9, 12, 18 and 22).Alas, it is a major disappointment. Piscopo's considerable skill at creating new characters and impersonating familiar figures is on display only intermittently.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | December 14, 2006
I love reading Christmas newsletters in which the writer bursts the bonds of modesty and comes forth with one gilt-edged paragraph after another: "Tara was top scorer on the Lady Cougars soccer team and won the lead role in the college production of Antigone, which by the way they are performing in the original Greek. Her essay on chaos theory as an investment strategy will be in the next issue of Fortune magazine, the same week she'll appear as a model in Vogue. How she does what she does and still makes Phi Beta Kappa is a wonderment to us all. And, yes, she is still volunteering at the homeless shelter."
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | January 31, 2007
CHICAGO -- A health care program is suddenly to elected officials what cameras are to cell phones: once optional equipment but now mandatory. Ever since President Bill Clinton's attempt to remake the industry blew up in his face, most politicians have avoided it like the Ebola virus. Last week, though, President Bush unveiled a major health care initiative, and Democratic Sen. Barack Obama called for universal health care. Also in the works is a plan from Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, author of the 1994 debacle.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | December 14, 2006
I love reading Christmas newsletters in which the writer bursts the bonds of modesty and comes forth with one gilt-edged paragraph after another: "Tara was top scorer on the Lady Cougars soccer team and won the lead role in the college production of Antigone, which by the way they are performing in the original Greek. Her essay on chaos theory as an investment strategy will be in the next issue of Fortune magazine, the same week she'll appear as a model in Vogue. How she does what she does and still makes Phi Beta Kappa is a wonderment to us all. And, yes, she is still volunteering at the homeless shelter."
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 4, 2005
Many young girls feel self-conscious and awkward about their developing bodies and aren't quite sure how to dress. For some, though, finding clothes has been particularly complicated in the last few years as America's retailers copied the trashier-than-thou fashions worn by celebrities such as Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera and produced sexy styles of low-rise pants, shrunken T-shirts and flimsy camisoles. Claire Maisel, 15, a sophomore at Liberty High School in Eldersburg, groaned in exasperation when asked what types of clothing are popular among her female classmates.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2005
Caryn Andrews had been in search of a dissertation topic when a member of her synagogue happened to pose a question: "Do you think religious Jews would be less likely to go for a mammogram?" Intrigued, Andrews, a doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland School of Nursing, pondered the question with her rabbi, Susan Grossman, at Beth Shalom in Columbia. "She suggested that I couldn't look at religion; I had to look at modesty," Andrews says. It was a crucial distinction in a faith where healing oneself and others is a requirement, but is often difficult because of some forms of modesty practiced in the Jewish community.
SPORTS
By Mike Downey | January 6, 2005
HE DID NOT have a unique batting style or stance that Little Leaguers could mimic, didn't grip a bat in an unorthodox manner the way Ernie Banks did, didn't swing fluidly and gracefully the way Billy Williams did, didn't dig in and rip from the heels as Sammy Sosa does. He was not immortalized in verse the way Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers and Frank Chance were, wasn't a screwball like Dizzy Dean, a flake like Rube Waddell, a bigot like Cap Anson, a boozer like Grover Cleveland Alexander or a freak of nature like Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 3, 2004
Movie stars John Travolta and Joaquin Phoenix want to be like firefighters. Better yet, they want to be like Baltimore firefighters! How cool is that? "They're the most humble, modest group of people I know," says Travolta, who plays a fire chief in Ladder 49, the recently released ode to firefighters that was filmed and set in Baltimore. "Their humanity seeps out of them, but they don't want to be looked on as heroes. That's why I love them so much." To Phoenix, whose Jack Morrison is the firefighter at the center of Ladder 49, the resilience of Baltimore's elite was impressive.
NEWS
April 15, 1994
Legal Aid Goes OnThe writer is executive director of the Legal Aid Bureau.Holy WeekNo local TV stations scheduled any Christian programming during Holy Week '94. This is not right. Holy Week is the most solemn and sacred week in the church year.Baltimore probably has more Christian churches than any city of its size. In past years Christian movies and programs during Holy Week could be found on local stations.Why not this year? Is this just another media attempt to make Christianity appear as a non-entity?
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | July 4, 1995
Visit Northwest Baltimore on a Saturday morning to watch the parade of Orthodox Jews walking to synagogue on the Sabbath, and it's easy to see an otherworldly, homogeneous hamlet of fervent Judaism.It only looks that way. Among the area's 20,000 Orthodox Jews -- amid more than two dozen synagogues, kosher restaurants, ritual baths, Orthodox used-car lots and Jewish schools -- are thousands of people living next door to a religious phenomenon.Legion are the stories told by black people about walking along Park Heights Avenue on a Friday night or Saturday, only to be stopped by a Jew they have never met asking them to come to their houses for a small task that is forbidden on the Sabbath.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 13, 2003
Actor John Ritter reveled in his success but never played the prima donna. Born Sept. 17, 1948, the son of singing cowboy Tex Ritter and actress Dorothy Fay, he understood the fickle ways of show business. Ritter, who helped turn Three's Company into one of the biggest hits of the 1970s and 1980s, fell ill Thursday on the Hollywood set of ABC's 8 Simple Rules ... for Dating My Teenage Daughter and died that night from a heart problem that had gone undetected. He would have turned 55 next week.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 29, 2003
One genuine small triumph of American Splendor is that the title isn't ironic. The movie is a splendid, inventive piece of urban Americana about that hardboiled original, Harvey Pekar, played with high-strung brilliance by a never-better Paul Giamatti. These days reviewers feel the understandable temptation to shower any good film with superlatives to snag readers' attentions. So this picture's endearing modesty - its pockmarked textures and human fallibilty - will surprise and, I hope, delight those who go to it expecting the bold, experimental extravaganza heralded in the blurbs.
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