Advertisement
HomeCollectionsModest
IN THE NEWS

Modest

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jay Hancock | June 15, 2010
Last month hundreds of people walked into Jones Junction in Bel Air and bought Chryslers, Hyundais, Jeeps, Subarus and Nissans. Even Toyotas! They were not herded in at gunpoint. Nor were they financed by subprime lenders heedless of repayment. Many were staked by real banks with trained lending officers inquiring about their income and jobs. Nobody from government bribed these folks to buy cars. The $3 billion cash-for-clunkers program ran out almost a year ago. The buyers made rational decisions based on their needs, their private wherewithal and their appraisals of the economy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Erin Cox, Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Democrat Anthony G. Brown holds a modest lead over Republican Larry Hogan in Maryland's race for governor, but many voters have not firmly made up their minds and the outcome is far from certain, according to a new poll conducted for The Baltimore Sun. The poll by OpinionWorks of Annapolis found Brown leading Hogan 49 percent to 42 percent. Though Brown has a 7-point lead, the poll found his backers are less solid in their conviction than Hogan supporters. And many in Brown's camp are younger voters, a bloc that historically is less likely to vote.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 14, 2000
PRESIDENT Clinton may be excused for a lame-duck junket with Mrs. Clinton joining and Miss Clinton in tow. Soon he will not be able to do that. But the main message he should bring to President Tran Duc Luong and Prime Minister Phan Van Khai in Hanoi on Friday is that they should look forward to dealing with his successor. And, yes, he should hold himself up as role model for willingness to depart office with good grace. Vietnam will be a better country when Mr. Luong and Mr. Khai or their successors do the same.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 3, 2014
A few words about the "poor door. " Maybe you already know about this. Maybe you read on Slate, saw on Colbert or heard on NPR how a developer qualified for tax benefits under New York City's Inclusionary Housing Program by agreeing to add to its new luxury building on the Upper West Side set a number of "affordable" apartments. How the company won permission to build that building with two entrances, one in front for the exclusive use of upper-income residents, another, reportedly in the alley, for residents of more modest means.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 16, 2007
NERN MAPRANG, Thailand -- "To be a good girl," says Pannipa Chaiyated, demure at 13, "you must have manners, speak politely and help with the housework." That is when she is not slugging her opponents in the ring. In a country where femininity is highly prized and girls are often told by their parents to be discreet, obedient and gracious, female boxing is a surprise hit. Chanin Preechakul, founder of the Women's Thai Boxing Club of Thailand, estimates that more than 100 boxing camps around the country train girls, with a high concentration of them in Thailand's poor, rice-farming heartland.
NEWS
January 6, 2010
Is widespread use of full-body scanners an appropriate response to the threat of terrorism? Yes 50% No 29% Not sure 21% (1,149 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Should statewide officials and state lawmakers receive modest pay raises a) only if other state employees get raises b) whether other state employees get them or not, or c) not at all? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
June 7, 1993
Everyone in Baltimore is buying a home, Vincent Quayle believes. Some people are buying a home for themselves, others are helping their landlord buy more homes.Twenty-five years ago, using an organizational model he had discovered while visiting London, Mr. Quayle started the St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center to help Baltimoreans of modest incomes become homeowners. When that non-profit center celebrated its birthday recently with a tour of homes being renovated in Harwood, the stamp of St. Ambrose was easy to see on that neighborhood above 25th Street, just east of Charles Village.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre | January 18, 1999
I ADMIT it: I cut through.To get from Northeast Baltimore to Roland Avenue to my daughter's school, I drive through residential streets in Homeland and Roland Park. Anyone who has tried to negotiate Northern Parkway or Cold Spring Lane knows how sclerotic Baltimore's east-west arteries are. So people cut through.This commuter traffic does not please residents of Homeland, to whom apparently, we motorists on our way to school and work are a crowd of bashi-bazouks galloping over the hill to plunder their houses and slaughter their cattle.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 12, 2001
THE NAME IS august enough to sound like a New Deal program: Opportunities Industrialization Centers. OIC, however, is modest in almost everything. The sign on the door of its local office is barely visible from Forest Drive in Annapolis. The office suite is unfancy, the folks within chummy, informal. OIC's origins are modest. It was founded by members of African-American churches and businesses in Philadelphia in 1962 who set up shop in an abandoned jail. OIC came to Annapolis in 1978 in a branch opened by George Phelps.
NEWS
By Timothy D. Armbruster | December 9, 2013
Since coming to Baltimore nearly 35 years ago to work for the Goldseker and, later, Baltimore Community foundations, I have had the good fortune to observe and participate in the city's civic and philanthropic life during a period of profound change in the region's economic and social fortunes. And while the very difficult challenges of poverty, low educational attainment and crime are still very much with us, Baltimore's future seems, to me at least, a lot brighter than it was in I first arrived.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - There's an old saying in horse racing that all men are equal on the turf and under it. Put another way, this sport confounds sheiks and scions of American dynasties who drop millions of dollars in futile efforts to breed a Kentucky Derby winner. Meanwhile, two neophytes can spend $10,000 to breed a horse for the first time and come within a whisker of the Triple Crown. That's California Chrome's story as he prepares to chase racing's signature achievement in Saturday's Belmont Stakes.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
We're pleased that Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby's measure to address the employment discrimination faced by ex-offenders is moving toward a final vote later this month ( "'Ban the box' bill advances over opposition from businesses," April 7). The "ban the box" bill represents an important shift in policy that will give job applicants a chance to explain past offenses and better compete on their own merits. Yet we're alarmed by the nature of the arguments that are being advanced against the bill, which have been delivered with a vehemence that is seemingly disproportionate to the legislation's modest aims.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
If Scoozi, the new contemporary Italian restaurant in the Village of Cross Keys, doesn't rise to the level of destination dining, it does provide Baltimore diners a pleasant alternative. The restaurant opened in December in the space at the Radisson Hotel at Cross Keys formerly occupied by the Village Roost, a restaurant best known for its power breakfasts back in the day when that term was still in vogue. We're talking the 1980s. In more recent decades, the Village Roost fell out of fashion, and it wasn't a big surprise when the hotel closed it as part of a larger remodeling and cooked up this new concept to take its place.
NEWS
December 18, 2013
With public approval ratings for most political figures suffering these days - Congress is hovering around 9 percent, an all-time low - and unemployment still relatively high, it's probably not the best time for elected officials of any kind to seek a pay raise. Yet legislative salaries are now under review in Annapolis and are likely to become an issue in the upcoming legislative session. Lawmaker pay is an easy target for criticism. Rare is the voter who is left wide awake at night fretting that his delegate or state senator is paid too little.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
At first glance, it would be tempting to condemn the bipartisan budget agreement announced late Tuesday by Rep. Paul Ryan and Sen. Patty Murray, if only because it asks further sacrifice of the unemployed and of federal workers . Those are hardly the two groups on whose backs the rollback of certain untenable sequestration cuts should be made. Extending unemployment benefits at a time of high unemployment used to be a given in this country no matter one's political leanings. But now it appears that there's no touching the hearts of Congressional Scrooges this year.
NEWS
By Timothy D. Armbruster | December 9, 2013
Since coming to Baltimore nearly 35 years ago to work for the Goldseker and, later, Baltimore Community foundations, I have had the good fortune to observe and participate in the city's civic and philanthropic life during a period of profound change in the region's economic and social fortunes. And while the very difficult challenges of poverty, low educational attainment and crime are still very much with us, Baltimore's future seems, to me at least, a lot brighter than it was in I first arrived.
NEWS
By Derek Chollet | September 17, 2001
WASHINGTON - Some say that out of every tragedy, something good may come if you look hard enough. Sept. 11, 2001 may be remembered as a turning point for global diplomacy, when the world came together and joined the United States in a historic struggle against a common enemy. Terrorism has been on the international agenda for years. In March 1996, after Israel suffered four suicide bombings in two weeks, the leaders of 26 countries met in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt to promote cooperation against terrorism.
NEWS
March 8, 2006
When issues are considered by the Maryland General Assembly, most anyone can speak out. But big campaign donors have a proverbial bullhorn - so powerful is the impact of money on decision-making. This fact is so ingrained in Annapolis that many lawmakers assume it has to be this way. But it doesn't, at least not to the degree it is now. When politicians become too devoted to special-interest money, the solution is either to limit those donations - a reform that's been tried time after time with modest success - or to present those politicians with an alternative way to finance their campaigns.
NEWS
November 10, 2013
After seeing two unrelated stories in The Sun, I think I've discovered a way to use one problem to solve another. You ran a big article about the trouble police are having dealing with the Black Guerrilla Family ( on the same day you also ran a piece noting that the FAA has cleared the way for domestic use of unmanned drones ("FAA plan paves the way for drone use in U.S. by 2015," Nov. 8). So why not use the drones to clean up the BGF problem? Police say they have trouble building cases against BGF members because of witness intimidation and a strong culture of non-cooperation with police.
NEWS
By David Horsey | October 23, 2013
For the sake of the republic, it is time to say, "So long Texas; welcome England. " The government shutdown and the game of chicken over the debt ceiling demonstrated just how dysfunctional the American political system has become. Congress cannot even pass a budget, let alone deal with climate change, Medicare reform, a jobless economy or the looming national debt. And the situation will not improve because there are so many safe, one-party-dominant congressional districts where deluded voters keep electing the sort of Republicans who think political compromise is a far greater sin than hiring call girls or keeping an Argentine mistress.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.