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BUSINESS
By New York Times | June 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Although grandiose plans often go awry, even partial success for the Internal Revenue Service's $8 billion modernization effort will bring visibly big improvements for the nation's 100 million-plus taxpayers.Did you misplace the copy of the return you filed last year ago just when you need to document an application for college financial aid? The IRS, which now has a 45-day target to respond to such requests but misses it in one case out of three, expects to be able to supply a copy within 24 hours.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
A few years ago, a designer walked up to Rick Aronhalt's 100-square-foot booth in Baltimore's Avenue Antiques at 36th and Elm streets in Hampden. At the time, Aronhalt was selling a broad spectrum of antique pieces but toyed with the idea of specializing in midcentury modern furnishings. On a hunch, he had a pair of kitschy lamps with fiberglass shades for sale. "The designer came in, unscrewed the lamp shades and purchased them for the full price, leaving the [bases of] the lamps sitting there," he recalls.
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NEWS
By William J. Eaton and William J. Eaton,Los Angeles Times | April 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Despite recent criticism over costly congressional perquisites, the Senate is proceeding with an $18 million plan to modernize the subway shuttle that carries lawmakers, staff and tourists a few blocks from nearby office buildings to the Capitol.Under plans approved three years ago by the Senate Rules and Appropriations committees, four automated cars will replace operator-run vehicles on the line between the Senate and its Hart and Dirksen office buildings by the end of 1994.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Matt Nickasch's home is anything but typical - he lives in the tower of a repurposed grain silo in Locust Point. His condo on the 18th floor is marked as a "bin" instead of a unit, a nod to industrial days long gone. "I've always been a fan of historic reuse," said the 27-year old technical consultant for the federal government. "From the historical artifacts of the 1920s structure to all of the modern conveniences and amenities, I feel that it provides the best of all worlds - old and new. " There was, indeed, a former life for Silo Point as a grain terminal for the B&O Railroad - once considered the fastest grain elevator in the world.
BUSINESS
By Dallas Morning News | April 16, 1995
Reaching the Internal Revenue Service by phone rarely has been easy. But several years ago callers to the Buffalo, N.Y., office had more trouble than usual.The Treasury Department investigated and found that IRS telephones "may have been set so that false busy signals registered when taxpayers called the office."But that was the old IRS, agency officials insist now. There's a new one on order. Say goodbye to the uncaring, overworked paper shuffler of years past. Say hello to a customer-friendly computer whiz.
NEWS
April 1, 1996
ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS are busy at the U.S. Naval Academy, examing old buildings and calculating cost estimates. When they are finished, the academy hopes to launch one of the biggest renovation drives in its history.A total of 13 buildings, some of them dating to the turn of the century, are to be modernized. Twenty-three small storage buildings, including World War II-era Quonset huts, are to be razed. "We are just into initial planning stages right now," says academy spokesman Capt. Tom Jurkowski.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Reflecting growing concern over recent reductions in defense spending, the United States' top military leaders have warned that the Pentagon must boost its budget for weapons modernization sooner than planned or risk eroding military preparedness.In a memo to Defense Secretary William J. Perry, the military service chiefs recommend increasing the modernization budget to $60 billion a year by fiscal 1998, rather than fiscal 2000, as currently anticipated. The budget currently stands at $39 billion.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 19, 1996
WASHINGTON - The ranks of the military are now about as small as they are going to get. So the Pentagon is busily turning to its next priority: modernizing its arsenal.It's a ritual that recurs almost every decade with the rhythm of war World War II in the 1940s, Korea in the 1950s, Vietnam in the 1960s and 1970s, the Cold War spanning the decades and the Persian Gulf war in the 1990s.After each major conflict, the defense budget is routinely cut, almost as if the most recent war is assuredly the last one. The world, of course, doesn't always cooperate.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
The Pentagon has picked Aberdeen Proving Ground as one of four defense research centers in the nation to participate in a planned $1.4 billion program to modernize the military's advanced computers.Proving ground researchers use "supercomputers" to develop weaponry and other materiel. The modernization program announced this week will allow the replacement of outdated equipment, officials said.Aberdeen scientists have been involved in developing advanced computers for nearly 50 years, including the ENIAC, or Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator, the world's first electronic digital computer.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | July 18, 1991
A poor management record has cost the Anne Arundel Housing Authoritymillions of dollars in grants to repair and modernize its housing projects.Citing the agency's difficulties with previous grants, theU.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development rejected a request for $5 million last August, allocating only emergency money for improvements.Four months later, HUD officials in Baltimore also rejected the agency's long-range plan for improvements -- the cornerstone for securing grants for renovations.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash and For Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 22, 2014
Local developer Greenberg Gibbons Commercial plans a "major refurbishment' of The Shops at Kenilworth after purchasing a stake in the Towson mall last month, the firm's CEO said. The mall, located just off Interstate 695 between Charles Street and York Road, has an extensive free parking and an upscale clientele for its some 30 stores, which makes it a "hidden gem," said Brian Gibbons, CEO and chairman of the board at Greenberg Gibbons. "I look at Kenilworth as a specialty center as opposed to a mall.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Infinity Theatre continues to add sparkle to summer theater in Anne Arundel County, as the current show offered by co-producers Alan Ostroff and Anna Roberts Ostroff offers audiences an "adventure of marriage that is built upon the magical spell of young love. " The musical "I Do! I Do!" celebrates 50 years of a couple's marriage. The show was written by Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt, the same pair who authored "The Fantasticks," which was Infinity's first show and starred Anna and Alan Ostroff as young lovers.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
In the Lutherville development of Mayfair, 1 Seaberry Court is a traditional Colonial-style home. The interior, however, is designed for a modern, minimalist lifestyle. "This home has a current, versatile [floor plan] that features an open design in the casual areas, but also includes the formal adult entertaining areas of the living room and dining room," said listing agent Diane Donohue of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. "People love the flow from the living room to the office and from the breakfast [room]
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
The Ivy Hotel, the “boutique urban resort” under development in Mid-Town Belvedere, will have a modern American restaurant named Magdalena . The Ivy will occupy the massive Gilded Age brownstone at Calvert and Biddle streets that was built as a private residence and was most recently known as the Inn at Government House. Magdalena will be the public face of the 18-unit hotel, which otherwise will operate in the manner of a resort, with lounge areas and spa services available for guests only.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Much of the charm of Fells Point is found in its narrow back alleys and side streets - contributing to the area's original grid from land purchased by William Fell in the early 1700s. Many of the homes on these streets date to the mid-18th to 19th centuries, as the community began to flourish. Katy Greene Davis and her husband, Michael Davis, bought one of these three-story brick rowhouses on such an alley off Lancaster Street in 1994. "It was two apartments when we bought it for $82,500," Greene Davis said.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
On Gibson Island, where no two homes are alike, a magnificent 1960s modern house sits on 1.8 acres of wooded property at the highest point in the area, and is on the market for $1.29 million. Often referred to as the "treehouse," 703 Skywater Road was designed by Ulrich Franzen, a German-born architect who began his career with famous architect I. M. Pei. The home's exterior composition features glass, steel and stone. The open interior features a mahogany ceiling throughout, a massive stone fireplace, walnut built-in shelves and doors, slate and ceramic tile flooring, glass walls, and vintage St. Charles steel kitchen cabinets (the same used by Frank Lloyd Wright in his Pennsylvania masterpiece, Fallingwater)
NEWS
December 11, 2002
MAYOR MARTIN O'Malley's outburst against State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy doesn't change the obvious: Baltimore's two main courthouses are ratholes - literally. They disgrace the city and the criminal justice system. The list of fundamental and inexcusable deficiencies is long. Neither the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse nor its annex, the old post office across the street, has a single emergency escape, for example. Pure and simple, they are fire traps. To make things worse, elevators are rickety and often out of order; gray and red dust oozing through inadequate ventilation has made several employees seriously sick.
NEWS
October 29, 1990
Charity begins at home. Home for the Hunt family of Brooklyn Park, however, has been Harbor Hospital Center for at least three generations and 40 years.The late Irene Hunt and her husband Donald, of Brooklyn Park, devoted 36 years of service to the institution; she, as a night supervisor, and he, a security guard.Their children, too, have had positions varying from secretarial to nursing. Feeling such affection for the institution, the Hunt children and grandchildren have donated a generous gift to the hospital's Modernization Fund in memory of their parents.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Several steps away from the crumbling edge of East 26th Street in Charles Village, a construction worker slowly unrolled a long yellow measuring tape into a circular hole about the size of a sewer manhole lid. Foot after foot of the tape disappeared as he sought to learn the depth of the hole being bored straight down into the earth by a hulking orange drilling machine anchored not far from St. Paul Street. Another worker at the block-long construction site Tuesday said the hole is the first of many that will be cut into the street as part of a new design to keep East 26th Street and the earth beneath it from spilling down onto the railroad tracks, which run parallel to the street, as they did last week when a century-old retaining wall collapsed amid heavy rain.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
You could be excused for having missed a couple of sentences about the Baltimore County government's phone system that were tucked into a paragraph about information technology upgrades in the middle of Executive Kevin Kamenetz's budget address this month, but Baltimore City residents might find them quite interesting. It seems that the county plans during the next year to complete the transition from traditional, analog phones to Voice over Internet Protocol models, which will ensure that all employees have their own direct-dial numbers, voice mail and caller ID. Oh, and it's expected to save the county $604,000 a year.
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