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By Text and styling by Rebecca Thuss | August 15, 1996
The modern clock has a new face. It's chic contemporary with a retro flair and plenty of sophistication. Lots of black and white and brushed aluminum make these timepieces something to watch. You'll find them sleek and minimal, fun and whimsical and all are up-to-the-minute in design.Pub Date: 8/15/96
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NEWS
Ron Smith | November 17, 2011
This is my 146th column for this newspaper. This unlikely marriage was arranged by then-Sun Editor Tim Franklin in the summer of 2008. I was stunned by the proposal, considering that for more than 20 years I had been publicly opposed to his newspaper's political agenda. I mocked what The Sun advocated and advocated what The Sun mocked. On Second Amendment issues, the differences were so stark that the newspaper once printed an editorial cartoon by KAL that showed me as a revolver spewing bullets out of its barrel.
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FEATURES
By Ann Powers and Ann Powers,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 29, 2006
"Funny" and "sexy" are two words that don't often surface in the heap of praise directed at Bob Dylan. He always has been as skilled a wisecracker as a waxing poet, and who could doubt his penchant for romance? After all, he wrote "Lay Lady Lay." To his own chagrin, Dylan's spicy side has long been overshadowed by his talent for writing generational anthems. Now, in the autumn of his years, it's good to remember that his joke book packs as much punch as his archive of wisdom. And don't forget his little black book, either.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Sun | April 8, 2011
A play taking a contemporary spin on an ancient Greek classic is the season's major offering from The Theatre at AACC. American playwright Charles Mee's "Big Love" adapts the plot of Aeschylus' "The Suppliant Women" — 50 brides who flee arranged marriages with 50 prospective grooms. Here grooms arrive by helicopter at the Italian villa where the brides are already ensconced and have their own ideas for a welcoming party that may include song and dance. At a rehearsal last week, four Anne Arundel Community College students from the 11-member cast enjoyed rehearsing dance moves with Lynda Fitzgerald, the coordinator of performing arts in dance, who was pleased at their progress.
NEWS
October 17, 2002
Candlelight Concerts' Performing Arts Series for Children will begin its 2002-2003 season with two performances by the Carolina Brass at 2:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday at Smith Theatre in Columbia. The mixed brass ensemble - two trumpets, horn, trombone and tuba - will present a program of music from ancient to modern times. The Performing Arts Series for Children is comprised of six concerts for children ages 4 through 11 and their families. In the series are musical theater productions of Pinocchio and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow; the National Marionette Theatre's Alice in Wonderland; Music for the First President by Ginger and David Hildebrand; and a child's introduction to the string quartet presented by the Ying Quartet.
NEWS
Ron Smith | November 17, 2011
This is my 146th column for this newspaper. This unlikely marriage was arranged by then-Sun Editor Tim Franklin in the summer of 2008. I was stunned by the proposal, considering that for more than 20 years I had been publicly opposed to his newspaper's political agenda. I mocked what The Sun advocated and advocated what The Sun mocked. On Second Amendment issues, the differences were so stark that the newspaper once printed an editorial cartoon by KAL that showed me as a revolver spewing bullets out of its barrel.
NEWS
February 16, 1996
PAT SCHROEDER, Norman Mineta, Tom Bevill. In all, 20 Democrats have decided the Republican takeover of the House means it's time for them to move on. The result could be a firmer hold on the reins of power by the Republican majority. The liberal Democrat likely to replace Kweisi Mfume is in for some rough times.It will take an exceptional person to take on this job. Mr. Mfume had the benefit of Democratic leadership during most of his five House terms. But as Congress changed, so did he, from a --iki-wearing activist to a tailored-suit conciliator able to gain praise even from conservative House Speaker New Gingrich.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2001
Terrorists who kill themselves for their cause are murderous and often misguided - but almost never crazy. The discipline and preparation required for such an act renders the mentally unstable poor candidates, according to psychologists and others who have studied suicide warriors throughout history. And the teamwork required - authorities say at least 19 were involved directly in the four hijackings last week - rules out most forms of sociopathy. As distasteful as it seems to Western sensibilities, the psychological profile of a suicide terrorist more closely resembles that of a fanatical soldier or idealistic hunger striker than a lunatic killer.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | February 10, 2009
Televisions, computers, e-mail, cell phones. As technology has wormed its way into our everyday lives over the past 75 years or so, Hollywood has served as both harbinger and trendsetter. Just as imaginative screenwriters have always delighted in showing where technology might take us, trendy screenwriters have never hesitated to embrace the newest technologies as essential parts of everyday life. And nothing can popularize a new gadget like having it show up in the movies. As much confidence as Steve Jobs may have had in the personal computer he helped to invent, here's betting he really knew the PC had arrived when it started showing up in movies like 1983's WarGames.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | January 3, 2009
Anyone who thinks of a silent film as something to be endured, not enjoyed, has never seen a film by the great Charlie Chaplin. To see what I mean, check out 1936's Modern Times (8 p.m., TCM), Chaplin's last silent and one of the greatest comedies of all time. Chaplin had been perfecting his Little Tramp character for nearly a quarter-century, and though talking pictures had come in nine years earlier, he saw no reason to add dialogue to his films; his screen persona - an unkempt, ill-clothed little fella who endured every social injustice the world could throw at him, while rarely losing his perspective and never losing his heart - spoke a universal language that had no need for dialogue.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | February 10, 2009
Televisions, computers, e-mail, cell phones. As technology has wormed its way into our everyday lives over the past 75 years or so, Hollywood has served as both harbinger and trendsetter. Just as imaginative screenwriters have always delighted in showing where technology might take us, trendy screenwriters have never hesitated to embrace the newest technologies as essential parts of everyday life. And nothing can popularize a new gadget like having it show up in the movies. As much confidence as Steve Jobs may have had in the personal computer he helped to invent, here's betting he really knew the PC had arrived when it started showing up in movies like 1983's WarGames.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | January 3, 2009
Anyone who thinks of a silent film as something to be endured, not enjoyed, has never seen a film by the great Charlie Chaplin. To see what I mean, check out 1936's Modern Times (8 p.m., TCM), Chaplin's last silent and one of the greatest comedies of all time. Chaplin had been perfecting his Little Tramp character for nearly a quarter-century, and though talking pictures had come in nine years earlier, he saw no reason to add dialogue to his films; his screen persona - an unkempt, ill-clothed little fella who endured every social injustice the world could throw at him, while rarely losing his perspective and never losing his heart - spoke a universal language that had no need for dialogue.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | June 12, 2008
Hot night, New York: a little breeze in the trees in the deep stone canyons as I look out my window, thousands of little lighted windows of private lives, one of which is mine. I'm reminded of this by the fact that a hundred feet away, a man stands at a window looking through binoculars that seem to be trained precisely on me, and though he surely would prefer looking at someone more exciting than a tall bespectacled man in black T-shirt and jeans, a man who is not jumping around playing air guitar or fastening his hair to his head with strips of tape or unzipping the dress of a beautiful woman, nonetheless he is focused on me, and I don't leap back from the window in horror - I feel (slightly)
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | July 8, 2007
PAY FOR IT, AND THEY WILL COME. That was the part of the pitch that caught my attention. My husband and I had been sitting in the salesman's air-conditioned office for more than the 90 minutes that was required of us in exchange for this free weekend at the resort. We'd been listening -- well, I had been listening -- to the salesman's high-speed lecture on the value of purchasing a time share. You pay what amounts to the price of a nice used car for the right to vacation for one week at this or some other fancy resort -- forever.
FEATURES
By Ann Powers and Ann Powers,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 29, 2006
"Funny" and "sexy" are two words that don't often surface in the heap of praise directed at Bob Dylan. He always has been as skilled a wisecracker as a waxing poet, and who could doubt his penchant for romance? After all, he wrote "Lay Lady Lay." To his own chagrin, Dylan's spicy side has long been overshadowed by his talent for writing generational anthems. Now, in the autumn of his years, it's good to remember that his joke book packs as much punch as his archive of wisdom. And don't forget his little black book, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 9, 2004
Arrogance and religious hypocrisy, revolutionary fanaticism, spies and lies, wrongful imprisonment, beheadings - times haven't changed all that much since the Reign of Terror in 1790s France, have they? That's the main point behind Washington National Opera's season-opening production of Umberto Giordano's Andrea Chenier, one of the major works in the verismo - realism - style that first electrified audiences at the end of the 19th century. You can count on a few extra realistic flourishes in this staging, which was devised by Mariusz Trelinski, the Polish film, theater and opera director responsible for the highly imaginative, often insightful and just plain riveting version of Puccini's Madama Butterfly presented by Washington National in 2001.
NEWS
By DANIEL J. WHELAN | August 27, 1995
The editorial ''Telephone Chaos'' (Aug. 16) calls on readers to ''pity the folks in the telephone business'' because ''they're running out of numbers.''We in the telephone industry can bear the sarcasm and understand the urge to vent frustration with changes in the current dialing system. We're not asking for pity, just understanding of the issues.First, we would ask that you keep in mind that everyone who picks up a phone or uses a pager or a fax machine is affected. It's not Bell Atlantic that is running out of numbers; we all are.Second, and on a more positive note, the demand for telephone numbers is a healthy indicator of economic development.
TOPIC
By THE NATIONAL REVIEW | November 17, 2002
THERE HAVE BEEN three national elections in the modern era in which conservatives made massive gains. In 1980, a conservative won the presidency. In 1994, conservatives became a majority of the party that controlled Congress. The 2002 election is another such advance. It is more surprising, and in that sense more impressive, than the others were. Conservatives were likely to do well in 1994, if not quite as well as they did, since a Democratic president was in office. In 1980, Ronald Reagan had a stagflationary economy to run against.
NEWS
October 17, 2002
Candlelight Concerts' Performing Arts Series for Children will begin its 2002-2003 season with two performances by the Carolina Brass at 2:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday at Smith Theatre in Columbia. The mixed brass ensemble - two trumpets, horn, trombone and tuba - will present a program of music from ancient to modern times. The Performing Arts Series for Children is comprised of six concerts for children ages 4 through 11 and their families. In the series are musical theater productions of Pinocchio and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow; the National Marionette Theatre's Alice in Wonderland; Music for the First President by Ginger and David Hildebrand; and a child's introduction to the string quartet presented by the Ying Quartet.
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