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By Larry Tye and Larry Tye,Boston Globe | August 2, 1993
BOSTON -- Reggie Lewis' tragic death last week has become national topic No. 1 for many health professionals who are trying to learn from the case and ensure that mistakes allegedly made in it aren't repeated.Start with doctors and the advice they dispense.Lewis got the best money could buy, consulting with more than 20 specialists and subspecialists from Boston to Los Angeles. But, like Larry Bird and other sports celebrities with serious ailments, he didn't use an old-fashioned family doctor to help him interpret the conflicting advice and provide the independent counsel that even the best team doctor can't offer.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Henrietta Lacks had no control when doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital used her cells 62 years ago in research that led to groundbreaking medical advances. But now her descendants will. The National Institutes of Health said Wednesday that it had reached an agreement with Lacks' family that requires scientists to get permission from the government agency to use her genome, or genetic blueprint. It was derived from cells taken from the 31-year-old from Turners Station after she died from an aggressive form of cervical cancer in 1951.
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FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2007
Heather Zampier of Windsor Mill proves that, sometimes, the will to dance is even stronger than the wisdom of modern medicine. Zampier will continue her run on tonight's second round of Fox's reality hit show So You Think You Can Dance. On TV So You Think You Can Dance airs at 9 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45).
HEALTH
By Susan Reimer | March 11, 2010
M y husband the sports writer calls it "Team Reimer," and he says it has more members than the supporting casts behind any Olympic athlete he's ever covered. I tell him that if I was as young and fit as the athletes he writes about, I wouldn't need a team to keep me on the road. But I'm not, and so I have a yoga trainer, a massage therapist, the best hair-colorist in my town, a manicurist, a general practitioner to whom I am devoted and an aesthetician. Not that my husband knows what an aesthetician is. Now there is a new member of Team Reimer.
SPORTS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | November 19, 1995
SAN FRANCISCO -- Another miracle of modern medicine: Steve Young could get some playing time as the backup quarterback in Miami tomorrow night, a week after the 1994 NFL MVP had arthroscopic surgery on his left shoulder."
FEATURES
By The Kansas City Star | February 23, 1993
The next big breakthrough in medicine may be achieved by going backward, not forward.That seems to be part of the message in a five-part public television series, "Healing and the Mind With Bill Moyers" (Maryland Public Television, 9 p.m. each night, Channels 22 and 67). Two hour-long episodes were shown back-to-back last night, a single 90-minute episode is broadcast tonight, and two hour-long episodes are scheduled for tomorrow.Modern medicine has become synonymous with high-tech machinery, sophisticated monitors and newer and better drugs.
NEWS
June 26, 1992
Dr. Josef Warkany, 90, a pediatric researcher who helped focus the attention of modern medicine on the hazards of the first nine months of life in the womb, died of a stroke June 22 in Clifton, Ohio. His discoveries helped create the medical specialty of teratology, which includes the study of the fetus and efforts to cure and prevent prenatal ailments responsible for many infant deaths.Li Xiannian, 83, president of China from 1982 to 1988 and a leader of the hard-line faction fighting economic reforms there, has died of an unspecified ailment, the Chinese government announced June 21. His was the first death among a group of octogenarians and revolutionary veterans nicknamed "the eightold men," believed to collectively rule China.
NEWS
By Wendy Cadge and Heather M. Hinton | October 4, 2009
Inflammatory rhetoric about "death panels" and "rationing" sheds little light on health care reform, but it unintentionally reveals another important issue: our collective illiteracy and fear of death and dying. These politically charged issues present a critical opportunity to think about how we die, how we wish to die, and what we can gain by listening to those who spend time with people at the end of life. Because of their unique role bridging the spiritual and medical worlds, hospital chaplains could play a crucial part in helping society deal in a more positive and constructive way with these issues.
NEWS
April 15, 2009
Measles, long a scourge of childhood before the development of effective vaccines, has practically disappeared in the United States. Today, most Americans either were vaccinated as children or got the disease before they entered school and are now immune. That's not the case for people who weren't born in this country, however, many of whom remain vulnerable. That's why health department officials are taking urgent steps to contain an outbreak of measles in Montgomery County, where four cases were reported this year.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | November 4, 1991
The late Dr. R Adams Cowley, founder of the Maryland Shock-Trauma Center in Baltimore, was "arrogant, determined, stubborn and difficult to get along with."So did former Governor Marvin Mandel describe the late Dr. Cowley today at a memorial service at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Lutherville.If some of the traits Mandel described seemed somewhat harsh for a eulogy, the former governor explained that Cowley needed and used each one because "the man was so determined to make [the Shock-Trauma Center]
NEWS
By Wendy Cadge and Heather M. Hinton | October 4, 2009
Inflammatory rhetoric about "death panels" and "rationing" sheds little light on health care reform, but it unintentionally reveals another important issue: our collective illiteracy and fear of death and dying. These politically charged issues present a critical opportunity to think about how we die, how we wish to die, and what we can gain by listening to those who spend time with people at the end of life. Because of their unique role bridging the spiritual and medical worlds, hospital chaplains could play a crucial part in helping society deal in a more positive and constructive way with these issues.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
Under Our Skin is a documentary wake-up call. This compelling account of the explosive growth of Lyme disease grows to encompass all the peculiar politics, corruption and inertia of American medicine. Everyone agrees that the tick-borne disease is "the great imitator," mirroring a multitude of ailments, including fibromyalgia and Parkinson's disease. But the ideas that Lyme disease can be chronic and that its treatment should go on for months or years have become points of controversy for physicians, insurers, and research funders.
NEWS
April 15, 2009
Measles, long a scourge of childhood before the development of effective vaccines, has practically disappeared in the United States. Today, most Americans either were vaccinated as children or got the disease before they entered school and are now immune. That's not the case for people who weren't born in this country, however, many of whom remain vulnerable. That's why health department officials are taking urgent steps to contain an outbreak of measles in Montgomery County, where four cases were reported this year.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2007
Heather Zampier of Windsor Mill proves that, sometimes, the will to dance is even stronger than the wisdom of modern medicine. Zampier will continue her run on tonight's second round of Fox's reality hit show So You Think You Can Dance. On TV So You Think You Can Dance airs at 9 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45).
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | May 21, 2007
Custody battles over frozen sperm and eggs. Children sired by dead men. Women giving birth to children who share none of their genes. These are the realities of modern reproductive medicine, a rapidly evolving area of science that continues to challenge notions of parenthood. It's murky legal ground, governed by few specific laws, with judges largely on their own to settle conflicts, and rulings that vary by court and location. "It's really the Wild West," said Arthur Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | May 18, 2007
Could Abraham Lincoln have survived the point-blank shot to the head he suffered in 1865 if he'd had access to 21st-century medical care? And, presumably, a medevac helicopter to whisk him to an operating table in Baltimore? Thomas A. Scalea and his colleagues say yes, the 16th president could have recovered from John Wilkes Booth's attack at Ford's Theater in Washington. Scalea, the director of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, the downtown facility that has revolutionized the care of people who have suffered gunshots, accidents and other serious injuries, said the injuries that killed Lincoln are far from the worst he has seen in a decade treating gun injuries in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | November 5, 1991
The late Dr. R Adams Cowley had to battle relentlessly to see his dream of a new system for treating accidents victims come to fruition.Dr. Cowley was the founder of the Maryland Shock-Trauma Center in Baltimore. He died Oct. 27 at 74 at his home, of a heart ailment.His memory was praised by a bevy of Maryland political leaders, among them Gov. William Donald Schaefer and former Gov. Marvin Mandel, at services yesterday at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Lutherville.The services were videotaped so they may one day be seen and appreciated by Dr. Cowley's infant son, R Adams Cowley 2nd, who was a month old yesterday.
NEWS
By Daniel Callahan | April 15, 1998
FEW CAUSES or crusades have such universal support as medicine's war against suffering. None of us wants to be sick or to be in pain. Most people do not want to die. Yet we rarely ask when enough is enough in waging that war.At the extreme, almost everyone deplores the end-of-life killings allegedly confessed to, though later denied, by a respiratory therapist at Glendale Adventist Medical Center in Glendale, Calif.Let us assume, kindly, that such killings occur when the killer cannot bear watching people die miserably.
NEWS
By Eric J. Topol | April 3, 2007
Each year, about 1 million people in the United States have stents put in to treat clogged coronary arteries - a procedure some might not have needed, according to a recent study. Although stents relieve angina, they were found to be no more effective in eliminating the risks of heart attack, stroke or death than drug treatment alone. Americans want to believe that modern medicine is sophisticated and evidence-based, but this study underscores how little we know when we make most medical decisions.
NEWS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 2007
As the son of a former small college standout, nephew of a top assistant coach in the Atlantic Coast Conference and brother of a two-time Carroll County Player of the Year, Westminster's Kevin Carr was born to play basketball. His body, however, needed a little convincing. After spending most of his life as the smallest player on the court, Carr began a physician-supervised regiment of human growth hormones about a year ago. Now, after growing six inches in a matter of months, the sharp-shooting, 5-foot-10 point guard has raised his stature and his game, positioning himself for a chance to continue his career at the next level.
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