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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
Ruth Kutscher, who fled Nazi Germany and after settling in Baltimore later established a business selling modern furniture, accessories and gifts, died Friday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 91. Ruth Lowenthal, the daughter of well known horse traders, was born and raised in Linnich, Germany, a suburb of Aachen, where she was also educated. Mrs. Kutscher was able to leave Germany and Nazi persecution with the help of Myer Strauss, the Baltimore philanthropist and president of Strauss Brothers Dry Goods Inc. and the Standard Textile Co. Inc., who had acted as her sponsor.
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CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
If walls could talk, Capt. John Steele, along with two others, would have a tale to tell about the home he built circa 1788 in the Fells Point neighborhood. In Baltimore Heritage's "Baltimore Building of the Week" series, John Breihan wrote about this shipbuilder's residence, citing its design "with the dormer windows and high-relief moldings characteristic of English Georgian architecture. It was lovingly restored and adapted for modern living by the Hepner family. " In 1967, the home's tale became that of Jean Hepner's transformation of a condemned and crumbling structure to a magnificent restoration.
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NEWS
By Liz Atwood, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
Ten years ago, Nini Sarmiento and Rob Degenhard were scouring flea markets, antiques stores and yard sales searching for midcentury modern pieces to furnish their Rodgers Forge townhouse. They were having such a good time — and becoming so good at it — that one vendor suggested they try selling furniture themselves. And so Home Anthology was born. Today their Catonsville store has become a destination for those seeking midcentury modern, vintage, and retro furniture and accessories.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Daniel Reed's flair for decorating and interior design - especially during the holiday season - is immediately evident at the front door of his very modern duplex in Baltimore's Clipper Mill development. To visit this home is to slip into a winter wonderland; a fantasy in light, color and motion. "Wait until you get inside," said the 44-year-old president of his own design firm. "I love decorating for Christmas. " He doesn't exaggerate. Imagine seeing the most beautifully embellished department store window and being able to walk through the glass and become a part of that other-worldly tableau.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
While the antiques dealers are bidding up the prices of old wooden sleds and rustic benches at the auction, we members of the cult of retro junk sort through the boxes of rubbish in the back room and find heaven: a wink of chrome, a sleek machine, a reminder of an age when it seemed that technology would simplify everything.We know that these objects aren't simply appliances and fans and thermometers and ashtrays. They are, when dusted and polished, art.Demand for retro junk is growing, antiques and collectibles dealers are finding.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
If walls could talk, Capt. John Steele, along with two others, would have a tale to tell about the home he built circa 1788 in the Fells Point neighborhood. In Baltimore Heritage's "Baltimore Building of the Week" series, John Breihan wrote about this shipbuilder's residence, citing its design "with the dormer windows and high-relief moldings characteristic of English Georgian architecture. It was lovingly restored and adapted for modern living by the Hepner family. " In 1967, the home's tale became that of Jean Hepner's transformation of a condemned and crumbling structure to a magnificent restoration.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 15, 1994
Q: I have moved into a home that might be called modern in its design, though more of the Frank Lloyd Wright variety than the glass-and-steel type. The rooms aren't large, and I want to furnish them in a style consistent with the architecture. But most contemporary pieces seem rather massive. Where I can find more appropriately scaled furniture for our average-sized anatomies?A: You're generally right about the size of contemporary pieces. They're hardly a good fit for average rooms or body types, but they're popular among those who agree that the bigger an object, the higher its price should be.I'm being a bit flippant, of course.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | June 8, 2008
Shops that sell old and used designer apparel often refer to their wares as "vintage clothing." And now I'm seeing stores offering "vintage furniture." Can you tell me what exactly that means? I do like both traditionally styled and modern furniture, whether newly made or originals. Can modern-type furnishings qualify as "vintage"? And where are some places to find them? The world of interior design does share some similarities with the clothing industry. Both are strongly influenced by fashion trends, for example.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Daniel Reed's flair for decorating and interior design - especially during the holiday season - is immediately evident at the front door of his very modern duplex in Baltimore's Clipper Mill development. To visit this home is to slip into a winter wonderland; a fantasy in light, color and motion. "Wait until you get inside," said the 44-year-old president of his own design firm. "I love decorating for Christmas. " He doesn't exaggerate. Imagine seeing the most beautifully embellished department store window and being able to walk through the glass and become a part of that other-worldly tableau.
NEWS
By [CAROLYN PEIRCE] | April 8, 2007
WOODWARD'S ANTIQUE GALLERY & AUCTION HOUSE 905 W. 36th St. / / 410-662-1875 Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday The smell of fresh paint still hangs in the air as the restoration of Hampden's Ideal Theatre, built in 1908, is almost complete. The last movie was shown in September of 1963, the theater closed soon after, and the Salvation Army took over the space in 1973. But the old movie theater is taking on a new role now; the building re-opened in March as Woodward's Antique Gallery & Auction House.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
Ten years ago, Nini Sarmiento and Rob Degenhard were scouring flea markets, antiques stores and yard sales searching for midcentury modern pieces to furnish their Rodgers Forge townhouse. They were having such a good time — and becoming so good at it — that one vendor suggested they try selling furniture themselves. And so Home Anthology was born. Today their Catonsville store has become a destination for those seeking midcentury modern, vintage, and retro furniture and accessories.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
Ruth Kutscher, who fled Nazi Germany and after settling in Baltimore later established a business selling modern furniture, accessories and gifts, died Friday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 91. Ruth Lowenthal, the daughter of well known horse traders, was born and raised in Linnich, Germany, a suburb of Aachen, where she was also educated. Mrs. Kutscher was able to leave Germany and Nazi persecution with the help of Myer Strauss, the Baltimore philanthropist and president of Strauss Brothers Dry Goods Inc. and the Standard Textile Co. Inc., who had acted as her sponsor.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | June 8, 2008
Shops that sell old and used designer apparel often refer to their wares as "vintage clothing." And now I'm seeing stores offering "vintage furniture." Can you tell me what exactly that means? I do like both traditionally styled and modern furniture, whether newly made or originals. Can modern-type furnishings qualify as "vintage"? And where are some places to find them? The world of interior design does share some similarities with the clothing industry. Both are strongly influenced by fashion trends, for example.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
While the antiques dealers are bidding up the prices of old wooden sleds and rustic benches at the auction, we members of the cult of retro junk sort through the boxes of rubbish in the back room and find heaven: a wink of chrome, a sleek machine, a reminder of an age when it seemed that technology would simplify everything.We know that these objects aren't simply appliances and fans and thermometers and ashtrays. They are, when dusted and polished, art.Demand for retro junk is growing, antiques and collectibles dealers are finding.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 15, 1994
Q: I have moved into a home that might be called modern in its design, though more of the Frank Lloyd Wright variety than the glass-and-steel type. The rooms aren't large, and I want to furnish them in a style consistent with the architecture. But most contemporary pieces seem rather massive. Where I can find more appropriately scaled furniture for our average-sized anatomies?A: You're generally right about the size of contemporary pieces. They're hardly a good fit for average rooms or body types, but they're popular among those who agree that the bigger an object, the higher its price should be.I'm being a bit flippant, of course.
FEATURES
By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 15, 1992
Q: I have a heavy vinyl wallpaper in my kitchen. It is coming loose in several places at the seams. I tried pasting the seams, but it didn't work. Any suggestions short of removing the wallpaper?A: Wallpaper seams that peel away from the wall are often very springy, and special methods might be needed to keep them flat.Since most modern wall coverings are not paper, but vinyl, the best bet is to use a special vinyl adhesive. Adhesives designed for repairs are sold in toothpaste-size tubes at many wallpaper stores and home centers.
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