Advertisement
HomeCollectionsModern Dance
IN THE NEWS

Modern Dance

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | September 18, 1997
Eva Anderson Dancers, aka the Baltimore Dance Company when it performs in Baltimore, does so this weekend: performs in Baltimore, that is, at the Baltimore Museum of Art.Anderson's Columbia-based company, now in its 20th season, uses many African-American elements in its work, from music to design to themes, but describes itself as more modern than ethnic.In this weekend's program, the company presents the spectrum of its repertory.From Anderson, there are "When Dudes Walk," a light work to a contemporary ragtime score by Don Pullen; and "Kadija," whose name comes from the dominant rhythmic pattern of its music.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
Harriet S. Eisner, a popular ballet, modern dance and flamenco instructor who taught for nearly 30 years at her Harriet Sauber Eisner Studio of the Dance in Pikesville, died June 12 of pancreatic cancer at her One Slade Avenue home. She was 88. Harriet Sauber, the daughter of grocers, was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. She was an Eastern High School graduate and earned a bachelor's degree in 1943 in English literature from Goucher College. Mrs. Eisner started dancing when she was a child and, not long after, became a teacher.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 1998
When a great modern-dance choreographer creates a solo for herself, it's like a writer turning from novel to short story. The materials and the method are the same, but the result is more concentrated, polished and personal.And the great modern dancers -- who were, by and large, American women -- all began working out their signature styles by creating work for their singular bodies.That's one point "Tribute to the Solo," at the Kennedy Center tomorrow through Thursday, is trying to make.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2010
T hunderous and rhythmic pounding of many pairs of synchronized feet is what characterizes Irish step dancing, yet its dual personality might be what sets it apart. While dancers stomped loudly and kicked swiftly to traditional music blaring in a studio in Columbia last week, their upper bodies remained rigid and arms hung motionless. The highly choreographed dance is a contradiction in body language that collides at the hips. "Sometimes I really feel it when you're moving the floor," Maureen Gately said to her troupe at Wednesday's rehearsal as she thumped a fist to her chest.
FEATURES
By J.L. Conklin and J.L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | October 5, 1994
The second showcase of local modern dance companies, seen at the Baltimore Museum of Art Saturday night, was a notch above last year's endeavor in both professionalism and choreographic invention.The three companies that performed were the Baltimore Dance Collaborative, Nancy Havlik's Dance Performance Group and Chris Dohse/Toothmother.One of the stronger works on the program of nine dances was "Vow: A Line Dance for Women, Black Dresses and Popular Culture" by Baltimore Dance Collaborative's Kathleen Murphy.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin | July 18, 1991
At first glance, their choices seemed to go against the choreographic grain. Jennifer Muller, a modern dance choreographer, selected a ballet company to work with during a two-week dance residency here, while ballet choreographer Lisa deRibere picked a modern company.But conversations with these two women, whose work will be featured Saturday at the Maryland Dance Showcase during Artscape '91, just prove that dance and dance creators are never static, and often defy categorization.tTC "There seems to be a trend for modern choreographers to want to work with ballet companies," Ms. deRibere said, "but I wanted to do something that I hadn't done before: I wanted to get away from classical technique and get down on the floor."
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin | April 3, 1991
The Next Ice Age, Baltimore's ice dance company, opened its six-evening engagement at Columbia's Ice Rink last night.Choreographers/skaters/artistic directors Nathan Birch and Tim Murphy, along with guest artist Dorothy Hamill, have put together a program that blends the best of skating with modern dance, guaranteed to take the chill out of the ice rink temperature.The program of seven dances at the transformed ice rink -- there are wings, as with a true proscenium stage -- was split between the premier of Mr. Birch's nearly hourlong "Sisyphean Victory" and six shorter dances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur and Ann McArthur,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2005
In an era when technology invades every aspect of our lives, it should come as no surprise that it has entered the realm of dance in Baltimore. Theatergoers can witness this collision of dance and technology in *blink*, a multimedia performance presented by the company movement/addiction tomorrow and Saturday at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson. The show contains two dance works - skip/stop and body.txt - that feature interactive sound and video combined with modern-dance choreography.
FEATURES
By J.L. Conklin | April 3, 1991
There isn't a dancer in America who doesn't owe something to Martha Graham. Even those who disagreed with her philosophy of movement admired her determination, courage and unswerving dedication to the art form.Ms. Graham, who died Monday at 96, molded her eponymous company in a time before federal art grants. And she trained her dancers and presented her works despite an initial critical reaction that might best be called confused. Yet, even when the critics were unkind, her vision of a new dance form fed on the energies of her time and her country, leading not just to a new way of dancing but a new way of looking at the art. American modern dance was her invention.
FEATURES
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | January 9, 1992
THE DANCERS sit at Bella Lewitzky's feet like eager students, soaking up her pithy admonishments and the knowledge of body movement she has gathered for more than half a century.Lewitzky, the driving force in modern dance in Southern California, is in Baltimore this week running a workshop at the University of Maryland Baltimore County for 15 local teachers and choreographers.The workshop, sponsored by the Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art and Culture, has brought together some of the most talented choreographers in the area who vied for the privilege to have their work ripped apart by one of the founders of modern dance.
NEWS
August 16, 2009
Auditions * The Columbia Orchestra will hold auditions 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. today and 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Monday at Christ Episcopal Church, 6800 Oakland Mills Road. Call 410-465-8777, ext. 4, or e-mail join@columbiaorchestra.org. * Silhouette Stages (formerly Shadow Block Productions) will hold auditions for a cast of 18 to 30 actors, singers and dancers ages 16 and older, for its production of "Sugar," a Broadway musical based on the screenplay of the film "Some Like it Hot." The play is about two musicians who are witnesses to a murder and are forced to hide from the bad guys by disguising themselves as women and joining an all-female orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2009
FRIDAY BALTIMORE SUMMER RESTAURANT WEEK STARTS: Close to 100 restaurants participate in the latest incarnation of this now oft-repeated tradition. Select Baltimore-area restaurants offer three-course lunches for $20.09 and three-course dinners for $30.09. Scour the list on the Web site to spot the best deals, then make your reservations and enjoy a meal at a restaurant you've never ventured to before. Runs through Aug. 16. Go to baltimorerestaurantweek.com. For reservations, go to opentable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dana Kinker and Dana Kinker,Sun reporter | July 12, 2007
Janette Sullivan has dedicated her life to teaching people of all ages how to "twirl with grace" in her ballet classes, and three years ago, she broadened her influence to encompass all types of aspiring young dancers, regardless of their training background, with the Westminster International Dance Festival. "I found inspiration from spending many summers as a youth attending dance camps around the country," Sullivan said. "Those camps really strengthened my dance skills, and I knew there were no similar camps in the Westminster area."
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
My dance career began inauspiciously, nearly ending in third grade when I missed the cut for The Nutcracker. Prancing around for the role of a mouse, my mind wandered out of the audition studio that day. Those little-girl ballerina dreams escaped me. Had I ever even asked to take ballet? No, my Francophile mother must have forced the rigid dance, not to mention the French language, on me. Nor did I enjoy my second brief encounter with ballet some three years later. To improve my ice-skating moves, a friend suggested I join her class.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | March 2, 2007
Eileen Rivers created her professional modern dance troupe shortly after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 -- a date that is the focus of her latest work. Rivers, 33, will use the universal language of dance to communicate the horrors of Sept. 11 and the Iraq war for the Mustard Seed Dance Company's staging of The Art of War on March 24 at the Chesapeake Arts Center. The MSDC, as it is known, plans to use film footage as a backdrop for the seven-part performance and has been soliciting photos of service members who have died in Iraq.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | August 25, 2006
The fourth annual Dancing for Dancers held Saturday at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts raised about $7,000 to benefit the Edward Stewart Memorial Scholarship Fund. Stewart was the founder of the Ballet Theatre of Annapolis (later the Ballet Theatre of Maryland) and served as the company's director for 22 years until his death from lung cancer in July 2002. He had expressed his wish to establish a scholarship fund to provide financial assistance for classical ballet training for promising students in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Sommers and Charlotte Sommers,Special to The Sun | January 29, 1995
When a ballerina points her toe, no one asks why. Yet, let a modern dancer curl into a contraction and everyone strains to get the meaning.What is it about contemporary dance that connects the choreographer with the audience in a way that classical dance doesn't? Is movement for the sake of movement valid?These are just a few of the mysteries of modern dance that were explored during the Maryland Dance Showcase Workshop for Choreographers, sponsored by the Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art and Culture and held recently at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2003
Skill and creativity have helped Eva Anderson Dancers Ltd. grow into a well-known and respected modern dance group in the Baltimore-Washington region. But supporters say persistence has been just as important, as the company begins its 30th season. "I just kept doing it," said Anderson, a Columbia choreographer who has been the creative and administrative force behind the company for three decades. "It seems like artists that are successful are those that didn't quit." The Eva Anderson Dancers - the oldest professional modern dance company in Maryland - will celebrate its milestone with performances at Baltimore Museum of Art on Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
April 5, 2006
Nicole Dortch, Samuel L. Banks SPORT BADMINTON GIRLS STATS -- Dortch, a junior who has run cross country and been a member of the varsity dance team, is in her first season on the badminton team. A student of modern dance in middle school, she has performed spiritual dancing at her church. SIDELINES -- Carrying a 95-percent academic average, Dortch has wanted to become a surgeon since she met Dr. Ben Carson, the prominent neurosurgeon, when he operated on her cousin at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By ALISON KWAN and ALISON KWAN,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
Forget the pink tutus, rhinestone tiaras and pancake makeup - there's a new spin on ballet. Garth Fagan Dance, a dance company and school, is on the cutting-edge of modern dance, using the "Fagan Technique," which combines the flair of rhythmic Afro-Caribbean styles with the speed and precision of ballet turns and "high extensions," a term for how a dancer lifts the leg. The dance troupe performs at the Hippodrome Theatre at the France-Merrick Performing...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.