Advertisement
HomeCollectionsModern China
IN THE NEWS

Modern China

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | March 16, 1997
BALTIMORE, March 1997:From China, they have come. Soldiers of the earth. They guarded an emperor's tomb in an ancient capital. Made of clay by court artisans to spare peasants the holy duty of being buried alive with their emperor. Here they are now, these warriors, in the Walters Art Gallery in Baltimore.Each face so different. Each pose unique. Two thousand years ago, they might have been red and green. The majesty of the feat is evident, though the samples here only hint of the huge underground battlefield from which they come.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff | April 18, 2004
Before 9 / 11, China's rise was the most important international story on the planet. China is home to the world's largest population, 1.3 billion people. It has one of Earth's fastest growing economies and at least 30 long-range nuclear missiles. Ambitious leaders in Beijing envision becoming Asia's indispensable power. While Iraq and terrorism preoccupy the United States, China continues a steady climb that could force a redrawing of the world's geopolitical map. Now Communist in name only, China is an unwieldy hybrid: an increasingly market-driven economy overseen by an authoritarian regime awash in corruption.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff | April 18, 2004
Before 9 / 11, China's rise was the most important international story on the planet. China is home to the world's largest population, 1.3 billion people. It has one of Earth's fastest growing economies and at least 30 long-range nuclear missiles. Ambitious leaders in Beijing envision becoming Asia's indispensable power. While Iraq and terrorism preoccupy the United States, China continues a steady climb that could force a redrawing of the world's geopolitical map. Now Communist in name only, China is an unwieldy hybrid: an increasingly market-driven economy overseen by an authoritarian regime awash in corruption.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 29, 2002
BEIJING - The patient's heart was beating too fast. On that single fact the physicians in the emergency room of Chaoyang Hospital could agree. But the emergency room otherwise seemed a poor place for the patient, a 26-year-old hardware store clerk, to receive expert help. Doctors injected adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, but the medication failed to slow his heart. The physicians, who earn about $1.50 an hour, huddled around his electrocardiogram. They decided the best step was to ask Dr. Michael R. DiNapoli of Johns Hopkins Hospital's department of emergency medicine for advice.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 29, 1993
SHANGHAI -- The managers of the Caoxi Vegetable Marke knew that city health officials would never notice if they dumped garbage on the ground. But they hadn't figured on talk radio."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 16, 1997
BEIJING -- From the reaction of the Chinese press yesterday, you would have thought Li Suli was a major film star and not, as she repeatedly described herself, "just an ordinary bus conductor."When she appeared on stage for a news conference in a powder-blue suit and fashionably sculpted hairdo, television cameramen and photographers mobbed her like paparazzi.In introducing Li to scattered applause, Communist Party spokesman Xu Guangchun said: "She has, through her work, brought warmth to the people."
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 29, 2002
BEIJING - The patient's heart was beating too fast. On that single fact the physicians in the emergency room of Chaoyang Hospital could agree. But the emergency room otherwise seemed a poor place for the patient, a 26-year-old hardware store clerk, to receive expert help. Doctors injected adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, but the medication failed to slow his heart. The physicians, who earn about $1.50 an hour, huddled around his electrocardiogram. They decided the best step was to ask Dr. Michael R. DiNapoli of Johns Hopkins Hospital's department of emergency medicine for advice.
FEATURES
November 8, 2007
Nov. 8 1997 Chinese engineers diverted the Yangtze River to make way for the Three Gorges Dam, the most ambitious construction project in modern China's history.
NEWS
May 6, 1996
Jack Weston,71, the rotund, balding character actor who played an uptight dentist in "The Four Seasons," a stalker in "Wait Until Dark" and the resort manager in "Dirty Dancing," died of cancer Friday in New York.In a 40-year career that spanned Broadway, television and movies, he played everyone from sleazy villains to terrifying killers to clumsy comics. On Broadway, he received a Tony nomination for his work in 1981's "The Floating Lightbulb."Ai Qing,86, one of modern China's most famous poets, died yesterday of undisclosed causes at a Beijing hospital.
EXPLORE
November 8, 2011
Historically speaking, China is a society that holds learning and education in high esteem. It's hardly alone in that respect. The emphasis on learning in the Chinese Confucian tradition are comparable to the learning-focused philosophies of Aristotle and  Socrates, which are underpinnings of western culture. China, it's also worth noting, is a key U.S. trading partner and a rapidly rising economic and military power, making knowledge of modern China a key intellectual commodity in the coming years.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 16, 1997
BEIJING -- From the reaction of the Chinese press yesterday, you would have thought Li Suli was a major film star and not, as she repeatedly described herself, "just an ordinary bus conductor."When she appeared on stage for a news conference in a powder-blue suit and fashionably sculpted hairdo, television cameramen and photographers mobbed her like paparazzi.In introducing Li to scattered applause, Communist Party spokesman Xu Guangchun said: "She has, through her work, brought warmth to the people."
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | March 16, 1997
BALTIMORE, March 1997:From China, they have come. Soldiers of the earth. They guarded an emperor's tomb in an ancient capital. Made of clay by court artisans to spare peasants the holy duty of being buried alive with their emperor. Here they are now, these warriors, in the Walters Art Gallery in Baltimore.Each face so different. Each pose unique. Two thousand years ago, they might have been red and green. The majesty of the feat is evident, though the samples here only hint of the huge underground battlefield from which they come.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 29, 1993
SHANGHAI -- The managers of the Caoxi Vegetable Marke knew that city health officials would never notice if they dumped garbage on the ground. But they hadn't figured on talk radio."
NEWS
December 21, 1995
THIS IS THE time of year when miracles seem possible. For Marjorie Fuller, the 72-year-old woman left a stateless person in a Chinese nursing home, her new U.S. passport is nothing short of a miracle: She is spending these holidays in the land she always called home but had never seen.Mrs. Fuller and her mother were caught up in the epochal events of modern China, deprived of a passport and forced into a labor camp. With the death of her mother three years ago, Ms. Fuller was left alone, the only Westerner in a rural nursing home, with scant knowledge of Chinese and no one who could interpret.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 22, 2001
BEIJING - Of the scores of canvases Su Xinping has painted over the past two decades, few capture the drive behind modern Chinese life as deftly as "Century Tower." The painting depicts a crowd of Chinese people climbing over each other, their hands outstretched, straining to grasp an invisible tower. Variously dressed in boxy, Communist-era suits, Western business clothes or just underwear, the mob includes the late Chinese leaders Mao Tse-tung and Deng Xiaoping. To anyone living in China today, the subject is obvious: the desire to acquire and possess in a nation that seems to have swapped the social safety net of Mao's "Iron Rice Bowl" for Darwin's "Survival of the Fittest" in just a generation.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.