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Moderate Republicans

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NEWS
By Janet Hook and Janet Hook,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 2, 2009
WASHINGTON - Congress now has so few moderate Republicans that at least in the Senate they could squeeze into a Volkswagen Beetle. Their ranks have been severely reduced in recent elections. Those who remain in politics have been marginalized by their own party, which has inexorably veered to the right in the past generation. But now this beleaguered minority has an opportunity to wield outsized influence on what President-elect Barack Obama can accomplish in Congress. Although Democrats made big congressional gains in the 2008 election, they are still a vote or two short of the 60-vote majority they need in the Senate to keep a tight rein on GOP filibusters that can easily gum up the works.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 4, 2014
Inevitably, considering the absence of a clear Republican frontrunner for the 2016 presidential election, the name of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush of the Bush family dynasty has been rushed to the fore. On his record in office and his soft-spoken personal appeal, he would seem a natural to go to the head of a list of only moderately impressive wannabes. But the immediate question is: Do American voters, after a double dose of Bushes, want another one? The fact is that memories of the two George Bush presidencies now set few GOP hearts aflutter.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 15, 1995
CONCORD, N.H. -- Liz Hager considered supporting Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania but now has about decided to sign on with the presidential campaign of Gov. Pete Wilson of California, although she disagrees with some of his positions. Susan McLane has decided to sit this one out.Hager and McLane are members of a group that used to be called "the Concord crowd" -- liberal-to-moderate Republicans who made up a significant, if minority, bloc in both presidential primaries and state politics in New Hampshire.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 15, 2013
Among the casualties of the 2012 presidential election, along with Mitt Romney, was the vanishing breed of moderate Republicans of which he once was a star, until his embarrassing lurch into conservatism. Mr. Romney first failed to win the GOP nomination in 2008 as a moderate governor of heavily Democratic Massachusetts. Four years later, he shed the middle-road path followed by his late father, George Romney, who won three terms as governor of Michigan but failed to win the Republican presidential nomination in 1968.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With a House impeachment vote less than a week away, the White House and congressional leaders have made a furious scramble for the handful of undecided moderate Republicans who hold the president's fate in their hands.Alarmed at the public defection of a northeastern Republican yesterday, Rep. Henry J. Hyde, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, fired off a letter to House members, pleading with them to withhold judgment until the committee has voted on articles of impeachment.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 21, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 44th in 1956 was a repeat of the 1952 election in many ways. Republicans again nominated Dwight Eisenhower. Democrats again nominated Adlai Stevenson. There was more suspense in the vice-presidential contests. Citing Eisenhower's heart attack of 1955 and intestinal surgery of 1956, some moderate Republicans tried but failed to get Richard Nixon dumped from the 1956 ticket. Stevenson threw the vice-presidential nomination open at the Democratic convention.
NEWS
September 26, 1993
Presidential politicking for 1996 has already begun in earnest -- in an official way. California's legislature has just voted to move its primary up to March. In the past the most populous state has voted in June, a month or more after the effective decision on presidential nominees had been made.Conventional wisdom is that the 1996 Republican nomination will be locked up by early April because so many delegates will be chosen so early. Conventional wisdom also has it that only a well-known insider can get the Republican nomination, since so much depends on raising huge sums of campaign money between now and early 1996.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Unless Bob Dole makes a miraculous comeback in the final two weeks of the campaign, the Republican Party is facing an internal struggle more intense than any it has experienced in the last 30 years.Moreover, it will be a fight waged without anyone in the party with the political credentials to be considered a national leader.The core of the conflict will be two mutually exclusive views of the reason Senator Dole has run such a weak challenge to President Clinton. The lines of argument are already becoming apparent.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 21, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The Republican-led House early today passed a $2.2 trillion budget that includes President Bush's $726 billion tax cut, even as Senate leaders fought off attempts by Democrats and moderate Republicans to slash the tax cut by more than half. The near party-line 215-212 roll call came after a long day of arm-twisting by House Republican leaders and top administration officials, who were determined to shield the president from a domestic defeat as war with Iraq commences. Scrambling late into the night for the votes to pass their $2.2 trillion budget, House Republican leaders faced opposition from virtually all Democrats and from some moderate Republicans who said the tax cuts were too large and the spending on key social programs too limited.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 21, 2003
WASHINGTON The Republican-led House appeared poised late last night to pass a budget that includes President Bushs $726 billion tax cut, even as Senate leaders fought off attempts by Democrats and moderate Republicans to slash the tax cut by more than half. Scrambling late into the night for the votes to pass their $2.2 trillion budget, House Republican leaders faced opposition from virtually all Democrats and from some moderate Republicans who said the tax cuts were too large and the spending on key social programs too limited.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 27, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. National  • Birthers are so passe the media has changed its focus to the much more important issue of Trig Trutherism . (Salon)  • Oh, U.N., will you ever learn? Syria to join U.N.'s Human Rights Council . (Fox News)  • Please die already bin Laden: WikiLeaks docs show  more Al-Qaeda attacks planned . (Fox News)
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Janet Hook,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 2, 2009
WASHINGTON - Congress now has so few moderate Republicans that at least in the Senate they could squeeze into a Volkswagen Beetle. Their ranks have been severely reduced in recent elections. Those who remain in politics have been marginalized by their own party, which has inexorably veered to the right in the past generation. But now this beleaguered minority has an opportunity to wield outsized influence on what President-elect Barack Obama can accomplish in Congress. Although Democrats made big congressional gains in the 2008 election, they are still a vote or two short of the 60-vote majority they need in the Senate to keep a tight rein on GOP filibusters that can easily gum up the works.
NEWS
By Michael Finnegan and Peter Nicholas and Michael Finnegan and Peter Nicholas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Arnold Schwarzenegger, the former Mr. Universe who became a millionaire superstar in Hollywood action movies, announced yesterday that he would run for governor of California, setting the stage for a tumultuous two-month campaign to unseat Democratic incumbent Gray Davis. The Republican actor, best known for playing a killer robot in three Terminator movies, opened his campaign with a raw display of the extraordinary national media platform at his disposal, announcing his candidacy on NBC's Tonight Show With Jay Leno.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 21, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The Republican-led House early today passed a $2.2 trillion budget that includes President Bush's $726 billion tax cut, even as Senate leaders fought off attempts by Democrats and moderate Republicans to slash the tax cut by more than half. The near party-line 215-212 roll call came after a long day of arm-twisting by House Republican leaders and top administration officials, who were determined to shield the president from a domestic defeat as war with Iraq commences. Scrambling late into the night for the votes to pass their $2.2 trillion budget, House Republican leaders faced opposition from virtually all Democrats and from some moderate Republicans who said the tax cuts were too large and the spending on key social programs too limited.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 21, 2003
WASHINGTON The Republican-led House appeared poised late last night to pass a budget that includes President Bushs $726 billion tax cut, even as Senate leaders fought off attempts by Democrats and moderate Republicans to slash the tax cut by more than half. Scrambling late into the night for the votes to pass their $2.2 trillion budget, House Republican leaders faced opposition from virtually all Democrats and from some moderate Republicans who said the tax cuts were too large and the spending on key social programs too limited.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Shogren and Elizabeth Shogren,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - Even though Republicans will control both houses of Congress, President Bush will face significant obstacles next year as he tries to push some of his highest-profile environmental initiatives. Bush's goal of opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge for oil and gas development may prove as elusive as ever, according to environmentalists, lawmakers from both parties and their aides. At least one new Republican senator, Norm Coleman of Minnesota, is likely to join a pack of seven or eight others who oppose the president's plan.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Now it's official. Rep. Constance A. Morella is the least loyal Republican in the House of Representatives, at least when measured by her votes during the first 100 days of the 104th Congress.Among House Republicans, none voted against more of the bills in the party's "Contract with America" than Mrs. Morella of Montgomery County. And it wasn't even close.No other Republican voted against more than four of the Republicans' 15 bills (covering 10 broad issues), while Mrs. Morella voted "no" seven times.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 28, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton complained yesterday that despite his repeated attempts to compromise with the congressional Republicans whose votes he needs to pass health care reform, they keep moving "further away.""I desperately want a bipartisan bill. . . . I feel like I keep reaching out," Mr. Clinton told a White House rally of disabled Americans ++ who support his health care legislation.The president vented his exasperation with the opposition party at a time when Senate leaders are struggling to produce a version of the health care reform bill that can muster at least 51 votes.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2002
REP. WAYNE T. Gilchrest, a moderate Eastern Shore Republican who has represented Maryland's 1st District since 1990, is facing what could be a credible challenge from the right as he seeks his seventh term in Congress. David W. Fischer, a Timonium lawyer who claims close ties to national conservative activists, filed last week to challenge Gilchrest in the September GOP primary. He vows to spend more than $200,000 of his own money in the race. "I expect major backing from powerful organizations, both inside and outside of the state," he said.
NEWS
September 18, 2000
WAYNE T. GILCHREST paddled his canoe with determination against the Sassafras River's currents near his Kennedyville home on a damp, cloudy morning. He was returning from a trip into a nature wonderland, almost in his back yard, where water lilies bloom and blue heron nest. He angled the canoe to buffer the vessel against the strong current and eventually guided in for a smooth landing. Oncoming waves didn't bother Mr. Gilchrest, Maryland's 1st District congressman. Not one bit. The congressman is accustomed to paddling against the tide, whether it's in the rivers he fights to make pollution-free or turbulent political waters.
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