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By Richard Truett and Richard Truett,Orlando Sentinel | June 15, 1992
If you are thinking of buying a new car in 1992, don't wait until the end of the model year in September.This summer is likely to be the best time to start looking. Because if you wait for the traditional clearance sales in the fall, you probably are going to find slim pickings.Now that auto sales are on the upswing,chances are that automakers will be rolling toward the end of the model year with lower than usual inventories. That means this year there probably will be far fewer leftover 1992 models on Oct. 1, the traditional first day of the new-car season.
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BUSINESS
By The Detroit News | April 6, 2007
NEW YORK -- The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration unveiled its final rule yesterday requiring automakers to install anti-rollover technology - called electronic stability control - on all vehicles by the 2012 model year. The regulation applies to all vehicles under 10,000 pounds and generally isn't opposed by automakers. Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp. announced last year that they would beat NHTSA's deadline by one year. Currently, stability control is in about 40 percent of 2007 model vehicles and 90 percent of SUVs - up from just 29 percent of all 2006 model year vehicles.
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BUSINESS
By The Detroit News | April 6, 2007
NEW YORK -- The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration unveiled its final rule yesterday requiring automakers to install anti-rollover technology - called electronic stability control - on all vehicles by the 2012 model year. The regulation applies to all vehicles under 10,000 pounds and generally isn't opposed by automakers. Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp. announced last year that they would beat NHTSA's deadline by one year. Currently, stability control is in about 40 percent of 2007 model vehicles and 90 percent of SUVs - up from just 29 percent of all 2006 model year vehicles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By New York Times | February 25, 2001
MILWAUKEE - The shaping of consumer demand for cars, and especially the idea of introducing newly designed models every year, is not only a classic American story but also one of advertising's historical triumphs. That story is told in an exhibition at the new William F. Eisner Museum of Advertising and Design here. By displaying and interpreting dozens of car advertisements, it shows how Americans were led to associate new cars with power, success and status. "This didn't just happen by itself," said Charles Sable, the museum's curator.
ENTERTAINMENT
By New York Times | February 25, 2001
MILWAUKEE - The shaping of consumer demand for cars, and especially the idea of introducing newly designed models every year, is not only a classic American story but also one of advertising's historical triumphs. That story is told in an exhibition at the new William F. Eisner Museum of Advertising and Design here. By displaying and interpreting dozens of car advertisements, it shows how Americans were led to associate new cars with power, success and status. "This didn't just happen by itself," said Charles Sable, the museum's curator.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1994
For Maryland's new car dealers, the 1995 model year has started off where the previous year ended -- on a roll.Sales of new cars and trucks jumped 40.8 percent last month nTC compared with October 1993, according to registration figures compiled by the state Motor Vehicle Administration.This was more than four times the 8.9 percent increase posted by dealers across the country.Sales traditionally taper off in the fall as the weather begins to cool and consumers turn their attention to other things, but that didn't happen in Maryland last month.
BUSINESS
By Jim Mateja and Jim Mateja,Chicago Tribune | May 1, 1992
CHICAGO -- Oldsmobile will drop its midsize Toronado luxury coupe and full-size Custom Cruiser station wagon after 1992, the first evidence that General Motors Corp. is about to whittle down its product offerings in order to cut costs and regain profitability for its North American operations.Earlier this week GM announced it earned a scant $179 million in the first quarter of this year. Though that was GM's first profit in six quarters, the company said its North American operations were still losing money, with estimates of $1 billion or more for the quarter, and that consolidation and cost-cutting would be accelerated.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1996
To listen to Stanley Penn, Pontiac's redesigned Grand Prix is doing just what General Motors Corp. had hoped."It has an entirely new look," said the president of Penn Pontiac as he showed off a bright red coupe in his Southeast Baltimore showroom."
FEATURES
By TAMARA IKENBERG and TAMARA IKENBERG,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2000
Kate Betts is reinventing Harper's Bazaar for a generation more attuned to cable TV than Christian Dior. Under the new editor-in-chief, the 132-year-old magazine is less about expenses and exclusion, and all about edge and inclusion. No garden party snottiness, no isolated runway-speak, no obscure designer name-dropping. February's Bazaar is the first to fully show off Betts' redesign. You'll find pieces from "Sex and the City" author Candace Bushnell, an essay by "American Psycho" prodigy Bret Easton Ellis, and cheeky charts and features that cooly combine Hollywood and haute couture.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1998
Maryland consumers ignored the stock market jitters and the Asian economic crisis last month to go on a mini new-car buying spree that boosted sales 5 percent, according to figures released yesterday by the state Motor Vehicle Administration.The gain here was slightly less than the 6 percent jump in sales nationwide as the auto industry closed its books on the 1998 model year.Vincent Trasatti Sr., president of East-West Lincoln and Mercury in Landover and secretary treasurer of the Maryland New Car and Truck Dealers Association, said big factory incentives were enough to make many consumers forget about declining stock prices.
FEATURES
By TAMARA IKENBERG and TAMARA IKENBERG,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2000
Kate Betts is reinventing Harper's Bazaar for a generation more attuned to cable TV than Christian Dior. Under the new editor-in-chief, the 132-year-old magazine is less about expenses and exclusion, and all about edge and inclusion. No garden party snottiness, no isolated runway-speak, no obscure designer name-dropping. February's Bazaar is the first to fully show off Betts' redesign. You'll find pieces from "Sex and the City" author Candace Bushnell, an essay by "American Psycho" prodigy Bret Easton Ellis, and cheeky charts and features that cooly combine Hollywood and haute couture.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1996
To listen to Stanley Penn, Pontiac's redesigned Grand Prix is doing just what General Motors Corp. had hoped."It has an entirely new look," said the president of Penn Pontiac as he showed off a bright red coupe in his Southeast Baltimore showroom."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1994
For Maryland's new car dealers, the 1995 model year has started off where the previous year ended -- on a roll.Sales of new cars and trucks jumped 40.8 percent last month nTC compared with October 1993, according to registration figures compiled by the state Motor Vehicle Administration.This was more than four times the 8.9 percent increase posted by dealers across the country.Sales traditionally taper off in the fall as the weather begins to cool and consumers turn their attention to other things, but that didn't happen in Maryland last month.
BUSINESS
By Richard Truett and Richard Truett,Orlando Sentinel | June 15, 1992
If you are thinking of buying a new car in 1992, don't wait until the end of the model year in September.This summer is likely to be the best time to start looking. Because if you wait for the traditional clearance sales in the fall, you probably are going to find slim pickings.Now that auto sales are on the upswing,chances are that automakers will be rolling toward the end of the model year with lower than usual inventories. That means this year there probably will be far fewer leftover 1992 models on Oct. 1, the traditional first day of the new-car season.
BUSINESS
By Jim Mateja and Jim Mateja,Chicago Tribune | May 1, 1992
CHICAGO -- Oldsmobile will drop its midsize Toronado luxury coupe and full-size Custom Cruiser station wagon after 1992, the first evidence that General Motors Corp. is about to whittle down its product offerings in order to cut costs and regain profitability for its North American operations.Earlier this week GM announced it earned a scant $179 million in the first quarter of this year. Though that was GM's first profit in six quarters, the company said its North American operations were still losing money, with estimates of $1 billion or more for the quarter, and that consolidation and cost-cutting would be accelerated.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2012
The nation's leading travel organization Friday urged the Obama administration to block the sale of E15, a new ethanol-laced gasoline, that could damage as many as 228 million vehicles that are not designed to run on it. After years of controversy, the Environmental Protection Agency in June approved the sale of E15, a blend that contains up to 15 percent corn-based ethanol, for cars made after 2001. But AAA said its survey shows that 95 percent of consumers were unaware of E15 and the potential that it could damage engines and void warranties.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1992
Chrysler to retool Del. plantChrysler Corp. said yesterday that it will spend $137 million to retool a plant in Delaware to expand production of its new Dodge Intrepid midsize car.The plant in Newark, threatened with being closed after its current lineup of cars ends in 1994, will be hit with some layoffs.Chrysler's new line of compact cars for the 1995 model year has been assigned to its assembly plant in Sterling Heights, Mich.Westinghouse debt downgradedConcerned about problems afflicting Westinghouse Electric Corp.
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