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By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | March 10, 1996
25 years ago (week of March 7-13, 1971):Results of the evaluation of a new model elementary school -- Northfield -- and an older, traditional elementary school -- St. John's Lane -- were released. Student/teacher interaction was shown to be better at the model school, as were third-grade language skills. However, the traditional school significantly outperformed the model school in mathematics at both third- and fifth-grade levels.It was announced that the intersection of U.S. 29 and South Entrance Road would be redesigned.
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EXPLORE
November 29, 2011
Bel Air High School is one of two Maryland public schools selected as 2010-2011 Project Lead the Way Model Schools in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) education. Bel Air High is one of 16 model schools from across the United States, announced Tuesday, that encompass the best that Project Lead the Way has to offer today's middle school and high school students. Project Lead the Way is a non-profit organization providing programs that offer rigorous, hands-on STEM curriculum, according to a press release from the Maryland State Department of Education.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1997
Describing it as Maryland's model for vocational-technical learning, a high-powered delegation of state legislators and educators visited Eastern Technical High School yesterday to see what ranks it among the best in the county -- and the state.The visit came one day after the State Department of Education named the Essex high school one of 11 Maryland Blue Ribbon Schools of Excellence -- one of six in the Baltimore area."We believe we have an advantage at this school because we help students dream -- dream of what they want to do in the future," Eastern Principal Robert J. Kemmery told legislators and county and state educators.
NEWS
November 8, 2010
Although the national midterm elections are behind us, Baltimore still faces another crucial vote this month that could have an even greater impact on its immediate future. In a few weeks, Baltimore schoolteachers will again be asked to ratify a landmark union contract that would radically change the way teachers are compensated and put the city at the forefront of school reform efforts nationwide. We urge teachers to embrace this opportunity to make a real difference in the lives of their students and their city.
EXPLORE
November 29, 2011
Bel Air High School is one of two Maryland public schools selected as 2010-2011 Project Lead the Way Model Schools in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) education. Bel Air High is one of 16 model schools from across the United States, announced Tuesday, that encompass the best that Project Lead the Way has to offer today's middle school and high school students. Project Lead the Way is a non-profit organization providing programs that offer rigorous, hands-on STEM curriculum, according to a press release from the Maryland State Department of Education.
NEWS
June 13, 2006
Baltimore's school system is taking some major steps to reform its middle schools, the glaring weak link in overall school improvement plans. There are some strong reform models, particularly among charter schools, but systemwide changes are not happening quickly enough. If achievement gains being made in elementary schools are to be sustained and if more students are to graduate from high schools with the necessary skills to pursue college or work, then middle schools must be tackled with a greater sense of urgency.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2001
GRAND PRAIRIE, Texas -- South Grand Prairie High School was floundering. Nine guns had been confiscated in one year. Students were failing. Teachers were breaking up knife fights. The school had seen five principals in seven years. And many students in the school's mostly minority population were falling through the cracks. Something had to be done. In a hotel conference room that came to be known as the War Room, 10 teachers named to a "Vision Committee" hunkered down in spring 1996 to decide the future of their school.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | April 12, 1993
Sometimes the fights start on weekends. Students from different communities challenge one another with an attitude of "they think they're better than we are."But come Monday, the aftermath of the tension becomes Principal Laura Webb's problem at Annapolis High School."We're trying to bridge the gap between community and school," Mrs. Webb said. "For the first time, we're trying to get black men involved with the black male students at the school as role models. We're starting out with visibility, having black males come to the school as role models, and then we're going to try to make leaders out of the students."
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1998
A Korean university professor and researcher whose country's educational system is often considered a model of achievement will be holding up a new model -- the Park School in Baltimore County.Young Chun Kim intends to focus on the Brooklandville private, coeducational school in a book he hopes will bring far-reaching reform to Korean schools. During the past two weeks, Kim got a firsthand look at the kind of progressive education he would like his homeland to embrace, and collected enough material -- including lesson plans and tests -- to write his second book.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 18, 2007
Jane Strawinski Ashton, who directed volunteer services at the University of Maryland Medical Center and was a former modeling academy director, died of heart disease complications Wednesday at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Parkville resident was 88. Born Harriet Jane Tewell in Chaneysville, Pa., and raised in Philadelphia, she had a cosmetology license and worked in a beauty salon as a young woman. She also took courses at Temple University and at the Towers College for Girls in San Antonio, Texas, where she also worked as a medical secretary.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | December 10, 2008
It's 2 p.m. at Garrison Middle School in Northwest Baltimore. In a second-floor hallway, Ronald Covington has stopped in his tracks. "Listen to that," he says. He smiles and raises his arms. Silence. Covington and four other men from BUILD, a faith-based nonprofit organization, have worked all school year to keep Garrison quiet and orderly. Acting partly as hall monitors and partly as fathers, the men have helped to cut the number of violent incidents at the school and to increase student attendance.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 18, 2007
Jane Strawinski Ashton, who directed volunteer services at the University of Maryland Medical Center and was a former modeling academy director, died of heart disease complications Wednesday at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Parkville resident was 88. Born Harriet Jane Tewell in Chaneysville, Pa., and raised in Philadelphia, she had a cosmetology license and worked in a beauty salon as a young woman. She also took courses at Temple University and at the Towers College for Girls in San Antonio, Texas, where she also worked as a medical secretary.
NEWS
June 13, 2006
Baltimore's school system is taking some major steps to reform its middle schools, the glaring weak link in overall school improvement plans. There are some strong reform models, particularly among charter schools, but systemwide changes are not happening quickly enough. If achievement gains being made in elementary schools are to be sustained and if more students are to graduate from high schools with the necessary skills to pursue college or work, then middle schools must be tackled with a greater sense of urgency.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2001
GRAND PRAIRIE, Texas -- South Grand Prairie High School was floundering. Nine guns had been confiscated in one year. Students were failing. Teachers were breaking up knife fights. The school had seen five principals in seven years. And many students in the school's mostly minority population were falling through the cracks. Something had to be done. In a hotel conference room that came to be known as the War Room, 10 teachers named to a "Vision Committee" hunkered down in spring 1996 to decide the future of their school.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1998
A Korean university professor and researcher whose country's educational system is often considered a model of achievement will be holding up a new model -- the Park School in Baltimore County.Young Chun Kim intends to focus on the Brooklandville private, coeducational school in a book he hopes will bring far-reaching reform to Korean schools. During the past two weeks, Kim got a firsthand look at the kind of progressive education he would like his homeland to embrace, and collected enough material -- including lesson plans and tests -- to write his second book.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1997
Describing it as Maryland's model for vocational-technical learning, a high-powered delegation of state legislators and educators visited Eastern Technical High School yesterday to see what ranks it among the best in the county -- and the state.The visit came one day after the State Department of Education named the Essex high school one of 11 Maryland Blue Ribbon Schools of Excellence -- one of six in the Baltimore area."We believe we have an advantage at this school because we help students dream -- dream of what they want to do in the future," Eastern Principal Robert J. Kemmery told legislators and county and state educators.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | December 10, 2008
It's 2 p.m. at Garrison Middle School in Northwest Baltimore. In a second-floor hallway, Ronald Covington has stopped in his tracks. "Listen to that," he says. He smiles and raises his arms. Silence. Covington and four other men from BUILD, a faith-based nonprofit organization, have worked all school year to keep Garrison quiet and orderly. Acting partly as hall monitors and partly as fathers, the men have helped to cut the number of violent incidents at the school and to increase student attendance.
NEWS
November 8, 2010
Although the national midterm elections are behind us, Baltimore still faces another crucial vote this month that could have an even greater impact on its immediate future. In a few weeks, Baltimore schoolteachers will again be asked to ratify a landmark union contract that would radically change the way teachers are compensated and put the city at the forefront of school reform efforts nationwide. We urge teachers to embrace this opportunity to make a real difference in the lives of their students and their city.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | March 10, 1996
25 years ago (week of March 7-13, 1971):Results of the evaluation of a new model elementary school -- Northfield -- and an older, traditional elementary school -- St. John's Lane -- were released. Student/teacher interaction was shown to be better at the model school, as were third-grade language skills. However, the traditional school significantly outperformed the model school in mathematics at both third- and fifth-grade levels.It was announced that the intersection of U.S. 29 and South Entrance Road would be redesigned.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | April 12, 1993
Sometimes the fights start on weekends. Students from different communities challenge one another with an attitude of "they think they're better than we are."But come Monday, the aftermath of the tension becomes Principal Laura Webb's problem at Annapolis High School."We're trying to bridge the gap between community and school," Mrs. Webb said. "For the first time, we're trying to get black men involved with the black male students at the school as role models. We're starting out with visibility, having black males come to the school as role models, and then we're going to try to make leaders out of the students."
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