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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Edward H. Hooper, a retired electrical engineer and model railroader, died July 8 from Parkinson's disease at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 81. Edward Harley Hooper was born in Massena, N.Y., and raised in Muscle Shoals, Ala., where he graduated in 1949 from Sheffield High School. After serving in the Air Force, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1956 in electrical engineering from Auburn University. He began working for Westinghouse Electric Co. in 1961 as an electrical engineer, and retired in 1996 from successor company Northrop Grumman's Linthicum facility.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Henry E. "Pete" Riecks, a retired Harford County public schools educator and photographer who was an ardent fan of the old Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad, died Sept. 22 of Alzheimer's disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Forest Hill resident was 79. "He was really a mild-mannered and soft-spoken guy who lived near the Ma & Pa's Forest Hill station. He was very knowledgeable and was always willing to help," said Rudy Fischer, archivist of the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad Historical Society and a longtime friend.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Dennis H. McGinley Jr., a retired electrical engineer and model railroad enthusiast, died Tuesday of heart disease at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 73. The son of a Jersey Central Railroad yardmaster and a factory worker, Dennis Hayden McGinley Jr. was born and raised in Allentown, Pa., where he graduated in 1957 from Allentown Central Catholic High School. He served in the Air Force for four years until being discharged in 1961. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1970 in electrical engineering from Drexel University in Philadelphia, while working for Roeback Co. in Trevos, Pa. He also earned a master's degree in business administration in the 1980s from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Edward H. Hooper, a retired electrical engineer and model railroader, died July 8 from Parkinson's disease at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 81. Edward Harley Hooper was born in Massena, N.Y., and raised in Muscle Shoals, Ala., where he graduated in 1949 from Sheffield High School. After serving in the Air Force, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1956 in electrical engineering from Auburn University. He began working for Westinghouse Electric Co. in 1961 as an electrical engineer, and retired in 1996 from successor company Northrop Grumman's Linthicum facility.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
George T. Myrick, a retired hospital director of personnel and model railroad fan, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. He was 85. The son of a Bendix Radio Corp. worker and a homemaker, George Thompson Myrick was born in Philadelphia and moved to Homeland when his father went to work at Bendix. He attended St. Paul's School for two years and graduated in 1945 from Friends School. After leaving Friends, he enlisted in the Navy and served until 1946.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2011
His father always set up an elaborate network of Lionel model trains late on Dec. 24, so when Frank Winner and his little brother, Jim, got up Christmas mornings, they'd find the living room of the small family home filled with moving cars, blowing whistles and flashing lights. The ritual made a deep impression. "It was awesome," says Winner, a longtime Severna Park resident. "I took [model railroading] up myself when I was a teenager. I've been playing with model trains ever since.
FEATURES
By MARILYN MCCRAVEN | November 1, 1992
With his beefy hands streaked with grease and sweat dripping down his face into the red bandanna tied around his neck, Rick Steffe tugs on his bib overalls and begins to answer a stranger's questions about the train he just rode on in Leakin Park -- the cars of which Mr. Steffe built with his own two hands.Everyone wants to know about the silver, brown and tan train cars -- powered by a black engine and followed by a red caboose -- that Mr. Steffe created in the basement of his Leonardtown home last winter.
NEWS
By SHERRY GRAHAM | January 31, 1995
Ask any model railroad enthusiast what his trains mean to him and you're likely to hear a variety of answers.To some, model railroading is an enjoyable hobby or a business interest. For others, it is a way of preserving and recalling history.The Sykesville and Patapsco Railway is bringing rail and local history to Sykesville.The group of eight model railroad buffs has worked diligently for more than a year refurbishing a 1910 Chessie Pullman car. The car was obtained through the B&O Railroad Museum and is being leased by the town indefinitely.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2012
Harry Craig "Frog" Snyder, a retired Baltimore County firefighter who was also a model railroad buff, died Feb. 8 at his Upperco home. He was 59. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy for the cause of death," said his wife of 32 years, the former Frances E. Bandel. The son of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad chief mechanic and an educator, Mr. Snyder was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville. After graduating from Milford Mill High School in 1970, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1974 from the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2001
The glass doors swung open again yesterday as they have every December for nearly 50 years. And while the crowd threading its way to the third floor of 225 W. Saratoga St. has thinned over time and the neighborhood has frayed almost to its core, there is no denying that the Baltimore Society of Model Engineers can still perform magic. From elevated platforms in two high-ceilinged, brick-walled rooms, it directed an eclectic parade of miniature trains yesterday afternoon through a sprawl of tiny coal towns, Western Maryland forests, old-fashioned country villages and replicas of downtown rowhouses.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Dennis H. McGinley Jr., a retired electrical engineer and model railroad enthusiast, died Tuesday of heart disease at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 73. The son of a Jersey Central Railroad yardmaster and a factory worker, Dennis Hayden McGinley Jr. was born and raised in Allentown, Pa., where he graduated in 1957 from Allentown Central Catholic High School. He served in the Air Force for four years until being discharged in 1961. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1970 in electrical engineering from Drexel University in Philadelphia, while working for Roeback Co. in Trevos, Pa. He also earned a master's degree in business administration in the 1980s from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
George T. Myrick, a retired hospital director of personnel and model railroad fan, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. He was 85. The son of a Bendix Radio Corp. worker and a homemaker, George Thompson Myrick was born in Philadelphia and moved to Homeland when his father went to work at Bendix. He attended St. Paul's School for two years and graduated in 1945 from Friends School. After leaving Friends, he enlisted in the Navy and served until 1946.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2012
Harry Craig "Frog" Snyder, a retired Baltimore County firefighter who was also a model railroad buff, died Feb. 8 at his Upperco home. He was 59. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy for the cause of death," said his wife of 32 years, the former Frances E. Bandel. The son of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad chief mechanic and an educator, Mr. Snyder was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville. After graduating from Milford Mill High School in 1970, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1974 from the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2011
His father always set up an elaborate network of Lionel model trains late on Dec. 24, so when Frank Winner and his little brother, Jim, got up Christmas mornings, they'd find the living room of the small family home filled with moving cars, blowing whistles and flashing lights. The ritual made a deep impression. "It was awesome," says Winner, a longtime Severna Park resident. "I took [model railroading] up myself when I was a teenager. I've been playing with model trains ever since.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2003
A Main Street hobby shop stocks every gauge of miniature locomotive engine and caboose. A model railroading club's elaborate displays attract 2,000 visitors a year. Some residents have replaced backyard flower beds with train gardens. In Cal Tedone's yard, trains chug along 300 feet of track circling an 1890s town. "The quality of my trains is so high that they can run in rain and snow," he says. "My locomotive has a snowplow, and if I get it moving early enough, it will do the job. This is serious stuff."
NEWS
By Carolynne Fitzpatrick and Carolynne Fitzpatrick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 31, 2002
Celebrating its railroad past, Sykesville will hold the first Sykesville Model Railroad Festival from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow . The festival will feature model railroad layouts, food, entertainment and train vendors along Main Street. A trolley car will provide free shuttle service to the festival from the Warfield Complex off Route 32. "For years, people in Sykesville have been fascinated about trains and models," said Margaret Spurlock, Sykesville tourism director. "The idea of the festival has been incubating for years."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2003
A Main Street hobby shop stocks every gauge of miniature locomotive engine and caboose. A model railroading club's elaborate displays attract 2,000 visitors a year. Some residents have replaced backyard flower beds with train gardens. In Cal Tedone's yard, trains chug along 300 feet of track circling an 1890s town. "The quality of my trains is so high that they can run in rain and snow," he says. "My locomotive has a snowplow, and if I get it moving early enough, it will do the job. This is serious stuff."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1995
Where a gift shop failed in Sykesville, a model railroad club has a proven track record.The Sykesville and Patapsco Railway club has refurbished a Pullman car and made it home to its model layouts. Members would like to expand the display into the attached caboose, which Gloria Lapkoff recently vacated after her shop failed to attract customers."Any business would have a tough time at that location," said Mark Bennett, club president.Both cars are on the old tracks behind Main Street and Sandosky Road and just out of view of commercial traffic.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2001
The glass doors swung open again yesterday as they have every December for nearly 50 years. And while the crowd threading its way to the third floor of 225 W. Saratoga St. has thinned over time and the neighborhood has frayed almost to its core, there is no denying that the Baltimore Society of Model Engineers can still perform magic. From elevated platforms in two high-ceilinged, brick-walled rooms, it directed an eclectic parade of miniature trains yesterday afternoon through a sprawl of tiny coal towns, Western Maryland forests, old-fashioned country villages and replicas of downtown rowhouses.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1995
Where a gift shop failed in Sykesville, a model railroad club has a proven track record.The Sykesville and Patapsco Railway club has refurbished a Pullman car and made it home to its model layouts. Members would like to expand the display into the attached caboose, which Gloria Lapkoff recently vacated after her shop failed to attract customers."Any business would have a tough time at that location," said Mark Bennett, club president.Both cars are on the old tracks behind Main Street and Sandosky Road and just out of view of commercial traffic.
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