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By Chris Kaltenbach | December 25, 1997
A magnificent performance from Gregory Peck and Horton Foote's understated screenplay help make "To Kill a HTC Mockingbird" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) a movie that won nearly universal acclaim, from both audiences and critics, when it was released in 1962.Based on Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "Mockingbird" is the story of Atticus Finch, a highly principled Southern lawyer who's called upon to defend a black man accused of raping a white woman. It's also about his two children, Jem and Scout (Phillip Alford and Mary Badham)
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By Dave Rosenthal and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Harper Lee's leap into the headlines with a lawsuit against a New York literary agent is a remarkable change for the reclusive author, who wrote a great American novel a half-century ago and has hardly been heard from since. Another famous author/recluse, J.D. Salinger, popped up in a legal challenge in a few years ago, when he tried to halt publication of "60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye," an unauthorized sequel to his classic coming of age novel. A settlement of that lawsuit -- coming after Salinger died -- limited the sale of the book in the U.S. and Canada.  Now Lee, author of "To Kill a Mockingbird, " has accused her former agent, Samuel Pinkus, and others of trying to deprive her of royalties from the novel.
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By Dave Rosenthal | April 3, 2012
USA Network, the American Film Institute and Universal Pictures said today that President Barack Obama will introduce Saturday's airing of “To Kill A Mockingbird,“ the acclaimed adaptation of Harper Lee's acclaimed novel. The tale of lawyer Atticus Finch's battle against racial injustice still resonates with many today -- particularly in light of the Trayvon Martin demonstrations -- and Lee's simple prose makes the novel appropriate for a wide range of readers. The movie, considered one of the best literary adaptations ever made, brings home her powerful message.
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
After a successful inaugural three-play season at its Eastport Shopping Center location, Compass Rose Studio Theater opens its second season with Christopher Sergel's stage adaptation of Harper Lee's acclaimed novel "To Kill a Mockingbird. " The play's strong script and powerful message make it an ideal vehicle for the Annapolis acting academy-theater. "Since opening its doors to students in 2010, Compass Rose has reached over 400 from age 3 to senior citizens in 10 Anne Arundel venues," founding artistic director Lucinda Merry-Browne said.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 10, 2001
Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird is part civil rights saga, part children's coming-of-age story, part courtroom drama and part suspense tale. The 1962 movie version, with its Academy Award-winning screenplay by Horton Foote, beautifully balanced all these elements. But Christopher Sergel's 90-minute stage adaptation barely breaks the surface, and Timothy Childs' front-and-center direction makes the courtroom speeches feel more like soapbox declarations than impassioned entreaties to judge and jury.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
Gregory Peck, who died yesterday at age 87, built a tower of celluloid on that now-rare movie quality, strength of character. Like Gary Cooper before him, he expressed with peerless authority what used to be called American virtues: decency, fortitude, self-reliance and an equal capacity for group leadership. With his wife of 48 years, Veronique, at his side, Mr. Peck died of natural causes about 4 a.m. at his Los Angeles home, family spokesman Monroe Friedman said. "He wasn't feeling well," Mr. Friedman said.
NEWS
May 20, 2007
Mockingbird: A Portrait of Harper Lee By Charles J. Shields Harper Lee caught the beauty of America with To Kill a Mockingbird, but has remained something of a mystery ever since. Charles J. Shields' portrait of her, Mockingbird, shows us a quietly reclusive, down-to-earth woman with an enormous gift and documents her struggle to live with that gift for the rest of her life. Shields' evocation of both the woman and her beautiful, sleepy and smoldering South are pitch perfect.
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By Linda M. Sweeting | February 28, 1992
WHEN I first saw it, I could hardly believe my eyes: a variegated pink and green shoot about six inches high and a full inch across, packed with incipient leaves.It was in the garden of my new old house, a garden which had been untended for years. Curiosity overwhelmed me: What was this monster plant? My neighbor did not understand my response at all. If he sees anything growing that he did not plant, he murders it, using all the chemicals and tools at his disposal.The plant grew and grew.
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By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
Mockingbird: A Portrait of Harper Lee Charles J. Shields Henry Holt / 352 pages / $25 Questions have surrounded Harper Lee's iconic 1960 novel To Kill a Mockingbird - and its reclusive author - since its publication. The most consistent query has been whether Lee wrote the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. Rumors that her then-best friend Truman Capote was the real author have persisted for years, fueled in part by Lee's inability to finish another book despite claims for many years that she wrote 10 to 12 hours each day. Scholars of both writers have concluded that although Capote might have had a hand in the editing and shaping of the novel, his style and Lee's are too divergent to consider him the author.
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By Dave Rosenthal | October 1, 2012
As the American Library Association kick off Banned Book Week, an annual event designed to draw attention to censorship issues, a bizarre case of visual censorship by IKEA is in the news. The Swedish furniture company acknowledged that catalogs distributed in Saudi Arabia were retouched, with women disappearing from some photos. For example, the Swedish publication Metro noted that an original photo showed a pajama-clad woman standing at a bathroom sink, with two children and a man nearby -- the very picture of "Leave it to Beaver" wholesomeness.
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By Dave Rosenthal | October 1, 2012
As the American Library Association kick off Banned Book Week, an annual event designed to draw attention to censorship issues, a bizarre case of visual censorship by IKEA is in the news. The Swedish furniture company acknowledged that catalogs distributed in Saudi Arabia were retouched, with women disappearing from some photos. For example, the Swedish publication Metro noted that an original photo showed a pajama-clad woman standing at a bathroom sink, with two children and a man nearby -- the very picture of "Leave it to Beaver" wholesomeness.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 3, 2012
USA Network, the American Film Institute and Universal Pictures said today that President Barack Obama will introduce Saturday's airing of “To Kill A Mockingbird,“ the acclaimed adaptation of Harper Lee's acclaimed novel. The tale of lawyer Atticus Finch's battle against racial injustice still resonates with many today -- particularly in light of the Trayvon Martin demonstrations -- and Lee's simple prose makes the novel appropriate for a wide range of readers. The movie, considered one of the best literary adaptations ever made, brings home her powerful message.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | June 3, 2008
The link to Harper Lee proved irresistible. When journalists reported on a lawsuit alleging racism in a public school in my hometown, Monroeville, Ala., they pointed out that the town was the inspiration for Ms. Lee's iconic novel about small-town racism, To Kill a Mockingbird. Set in the 1930s and told through the eyes of a child, Scout, it's the tale of a courageous white lawyer who defends a black man unjustly convicted of rape. The racial climate has improved significantly in the years since Ms. Lee published the novel in 1960.
NEWS
May 20, 2007
Mockingbird: A Portrait of Harper Lee By Charles J. Shields Harper Lee caught the beauty of America with To Kill a Mockingbird, but has remained something of a mystery ever since. Charles J. Shields' portrait of her, Mockingbird, shows us a quietly reclusive, down-to-earth woman with an enormous gift and documents her struggle to live with that gift for the rest of her life. Shields' evocation of both the woman and her beautiful, sleepy and smoldering South are pitch perfect.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
Mockingbird: A Portrait of Harper Lee Charles J. Shields Henry Holt / 352 pages / $25 Questions have surrounded Harper Lee's iconic 1960 novel To Kill a Mockingbird - and its reclusive author - since its publication. The most consistent query has been whether Lee wrote the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. Rumors that her then-best friend Truman Capote was the real author have persisted for years, fueled in part by Lee's inability to finish another book despite claims for many years that she wrote 10 to 12 hours each day. Scholars of both writers have concluded that although Capote might have had a hand in the editing and shaping of the novel, his style and Lee's are too divergent to consider him the author.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach and Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
With three days of films staring you in the face, it can be a challenge to parse the schedule and decide what's a must-see. Thankfully, Sun movie critics Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach are here to help. Check out their picks for each day. All films are at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St., unless otherwise noted. Friday It's always nice to start off one's visit to the Maryland Film Festival with a classic, and they don't get much more classic than Robert Mulligan's 1962 To Kill a Mockingbird (10 a.m.)
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | October 3, 1997
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes in Baltimore and Baltimore County.North Point PrecinctRobbery: Two men entered a home in the first block of Waterview Road about 8 p.m. Tuesday and robbed the male owner of an undisclosed large sum of money and a .40 caliber handgun valued at more than $600. Police said the victim recognized one of the robbers as a fellow student at Overlea High School and provided police with the suspect's yearbook photo. No arrest had been made.Towson PrecinctRobbery: A 53-year-old woman was about to enter her home in the 1800 block of Edgewood Road about 10 p.m. Wednesday when she was assaulted by a man who stole her purse containing an undisclosed sum of money.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Harper Lee's leap into the headlines with a lawsuit against a New York literary agent is a remarkable change for the reclusive author, who wrote a great American novel a half-century ago and has hardly been heard from since. Another famous author/recluse, J.D. Salinger, popped up in a legal challenge in a few years ago, when he tried to halt publication of "60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye," an unauthorized sequel to his classic coming of age novel. A settlement of that lawsuit -- coming after Salinger died -- limited the sale of the book in the U.S. and Canada.  Now Lee, author of "To Kill a Mockingbird, " has accused her former agent, Samuel Pinkus, and others of trying to deprive her of royalties from the novel.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
Gregory Peck, who died yesterday at age 87, built a tower of celluloid on that now-rare movie quality, strength of character. Like Gary Cooper before him, he expressed with peerless authority what used to be called American virtues: decency, fortitude, self-reliance and an equal capacity for group leadership. With his wife of 48 years, Veronique, at his side, Mr. Peck died of natural causes about 4 a.m. at his Los Angeles home, family spokesman Monroe Friedman said. "He wasn't feeling well," Mr. Friedman said.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Johanna Neuman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2002
CHICAGO - Seattle did it first. Los Angeles is doing it next. But this city of ethnic neighborhoods and exaggerated blue-collar grit - former Chicago Bears coach Mike Ditka likened the town and the football team to "a bunch of guys named Grabowski" - is where the United States' hottest intellectual trend really took off. Mayor Richard M. Daley last fall asked every resident of this city of 3 million to read Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. The response to One Book, One Chicago was electric.
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