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By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | November 2, 2008
After she was bombarded with questions from students about the presidential debates and this week's election, Jessica Ryan wanted to do something to get the students more involved. The answer came to her when she heard about a national mock election, she said. "I figured that there were probably a lot of kids who were interested in the election that never asked questions," said Ryan, who teaches American history and serves as the social studies department chairman at Edgewood Middle School.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | November 2, 2008
After she was bombarded with questions from students about the presidential debates and this week's election, Jessica Ryan wanted to do something to get the students more involved. The answer came to her when she heard about a national mock election, she said. "I figured that there were probably a lot of kids who were interested in the election that never asked questions," said Ryan, who teaches American history and serves as the social studies department chairman at Edgewood Middle School.
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NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1998
ABOUT 100 STUDENTS from around the state participated Oct. 28 in Mock Election Extravaganza at Long Reach High School.Candidates for federal, state and county offices discussed issues, and stressed the importance of each vote in primary and general elections.Members of the press explained the media's involvement and influence.Students met in small groups to debate the issues.After registration, debates and discussions, voting began at 8 p.m. When the school's polls closed, students relaxed with food and entertainment while waiting for the final tally -- much as their adult counterparts do.Election results for governor and lieutenant governor and the U.S. Senate were as follows: Parris N. Glendening and Kathleen Kennedy Townsend -- 85 percent; Ellen R. Sauerbrey and Richard D. Bennett -- 11 percent.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
Emily Sandford isn't old enough to vote, but she realizes the importance of the presidential election. On Thursday, the 16-year-old junior at Glenelg Country School stood before the student body and argued the ideological positions of the Democratic Party, while another student argued in favor of the Republican Party. The matchup was part of an event intended to bring attention to the election. Glenelg Country isn't alone. Several county schools have organized similar debates, as well as mock elections, in line with the historic race between Barack Obama and John McCain that culminates Nov. 4. Sandford said the election has created considerable buzz among classmates.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 7, 1999
TAKOMA PARK -- By a 5-to-1 margin, voters in a mock election called on the City Council to enact a ban on handguns.The petition question on Tuesday's ballot lost its authority when a Montgomery County Circuit judge ruled that state law prohibits local jurisdictions from passing gun control laws in all but a few circumstances.However, at least two City Council members say they will attempt to draft an ordinance that complies with state law but allows Takoma Park to ban handguns within 100 yards of public places.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2004
In a rousing declaration, the Republican presidential candidate asserted his stand against embryonic stem cell research because it means "we have to kill someone." The candidate's impassioned delivery won thunderous applause from a crowd of about 900 students in Westminster High School's auditorium and brought many to their feet. "There is nothing wrong with adult stem cells; we don't have to kill anybody" to harvest them for research, said Joel Ready, a 16-year-old sophomore, as he pumped his fists into the air and maintained that several diseases have been cured through advances in adult stem cell research.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2004
Emily Dachis walked out of a voting booth at Swansfield Elementary School in Columbia yesterday and declared allegiance to her candidate. "Kerry is way better than Bush," she announced to her friends about presidential challenger John F. Kerry. Fellow third-grader Barbara Cronin said she voted for President Bush because "he has good experience as president the last four years." Emily and Barbara were among nearly 570 pupils in prekindergarten through fifth grade, teachers and staff members at Swansfield who cast votes in a mock presidential election one day before the real contest.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,STAFF WRITER | November 7, 1996
As they sat around the lunch table yesterday, the topic was, predictably, politics.But these were no ordinary Baltimore County voters rehashing the general election. They were 10-year-olds reflecting on their first time in the booth as part of Kids Voting, a national mock election for school-age children."Mom said I should have my own opinion," said Rebecca Josowitz, a fifth-grader at Lutherville Elementary School who voted to give President Clinton a second term. "I felt like I was grown up and doing the same thing my parents were doing."
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | October 4, 2006
After a daylong test of the state's retrofitted voter check-in computers, it remained unclear yesterday whether the $18 million system works well enough for the state's elections chief to deploy it in the November general election. The machines experienced 10 problems yesterday, including someone accidentally kicking out a power cord, as more than 7,000 votes were cast during a mock election at the BWI Airport Marriott. Three of the glitches were identical and isolated to one of the 13 machines.
NEWS
November 5, 1992
Futuristic mock election woos pupils at ChesapeakeYoungsters at Chesapeake Academy learned about the election process this week, including the feeling of being wooed by the candidate.Students at the Severn facility visited the "polling place of the future" as they participated in a computerized mock election.Seventy-one ballots were cast for President Bush, 37 for Ross Perot and 27 for Bill Clinton.Voting followed two weeks of campaigning and debating by candidates chosen from grades 3, 4 and 5, who represented Mr. Bush, Mr. Clinton and Mr. Perot.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | October 4, 2006
After a daylong test of the state's retrofitted voter check-in computers, it remained unclear yesterday whether the $18 million system works well enough for the state's elections chief to deploy it in the November general election. The machines experienced 10 problems yesterday, including someone accidentally kicking out a power cord, as more than 7,000 votes were cast during a mock election at the BWI Airport Marriott. Three of the glitches were identical and isolated to one of the 13 machines.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2004
Emily Dachis walked out of a voting booth at Swansfield Elementary School in Columbia yesterday and declared allegiance to her candidate. "Kerry is way better than Bush," she announced to her friends about presidential challenger John F. Kerry. Fellow third-grader Barbara Cronin said she voted for President Bush because "he has good experience as president the last four years." Emily and Barbara were among nearly 570 pupils in prekindergarten through fifth grade, teachers and staff members at Swansfield who cast votes in a mock presidential election one day before the real contest.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2004
In a rousing declaration, the Republican presidential candidate asserted his stand against embryonic stem cell research because it means "we have to kill someone." The candidate's impassioned delivery won thunderous applause from a crowd of about 900 students in Westminster High School's auditorium and brought many to their feet. "There is nothing wrong with adult stem cells; we don't have to kill anybody" to harvest them for research, said Joel Ready, a 16-year-old sophomore, as he pumped his fists into the air and maintained that several diseases have been cured through advances in adult stem cell research.
NEWS
November 19, 2003
Mock election set tomorrow to test new voting system The Howard County Board of Elections will conduct a mock election from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow at five locations around the county. Maryland residents are invited to use the new voting system. Anyone not registered can register for the presidential primary and general elections at the mock election. The event will test the ability of the state's new voting system to transfer election results via modem to the county election office.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 7, 1999
TAKOMA PARK -- By a 5-to-1 margin, voters in a mock election called on the City Council to enact a ban on handguns.The petition question on Tuesday's ballot lost its authority when a Montgomery County Circuit judge ruled that state law prohibits local jurisdictions from passing gun control laws in all but a few circumstances.However, at least two City Council members say they will attempt to draft an ordinance that complies with state law but allows Takoma Park to ban handguns within 100 yards of public places.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1999
TAKOMA PARK -- The most closely watched vote in this city tomorrow might be the one taken on the sidewalk outside the polling place on a simple paper ballot supervised by unofficials.Citizens Against Hand Guns says it will hold a mock election on a referendum to ban pistols and revolvers that was removed from the ballot last week by a Montgomery Circuit Court judge.Almost 2,500 of Takoma Park's 7,411 registered voters signed petitions this summer to put the handgun question on the ballot.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | October 30, 1992
Students across Maryland had bad news for President Bush yesterday. In a mock election held over the past week, the incumbent finished third in the polling, more than 2,000 votes behind Texas billionaire Ross Perot.Of the nearly 220,000 votes cast, 103,080 went to Gov. Bill Clinton and 57,225 to Mr. Perot.The results were announced at a mock debate last night at Edmondson Westside High School in Baltimore that drew several hundred high school student government leaders from across the state.
NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1998
ABOUT 100 STUDENTS from around the state participated Oct. 28 in Mock Election Extravaganza at Long Reach High School.Candidates for federal, state and county offices discussed issues, and stressed the importance of each vote in primary and general elections.Members of the press explained the media's involvement and influence.Students met in small groups to debate the issues.After registration, debates and discussions, voting began at 8 p.m. When the school's polls closed, students relaxed with food and entertainment while waiting for the final tally -- much as their adult counterparts do.Election results for governor and lieutenant governor and the U.S. Senate were as follows: Parris N. Glendening and Kathleen Kennedy Townsend -- 85 percent; Ellen R. Sauerbrey and Richard D. Bennett -- 11 percent.
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