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Moby Dick

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By CHARLES M. OLIVER | September 28, 1991
Ada, Ohio--One hundred years ago this day, Herman Melville died in poverty and obscurity and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in New York City, far from his home in the mountainous Berkshires of Massachusetts. Unlike the lesser writers of today who fly like moths into the media sun (just watch Norman Mailer), Melville's celebrity was slow in coming; only decades after his death did his work begin to attract its deserved acclaim.And so, inspired by some romantic respect for a man who toiled magnificently, without earthy reward, I have reread Melville's greatest and most feared novel, ''Moby-Dick.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Comic operas don't come more endearing than Donizetti's "L'elisir d'amore"  ("The Elixir of Love"). The humor in this rustic tale, which involves a lovesick guy buying a potion (just plain old wine) from a snake-oil salesman to melt the heart of an indifferent woman, still has good miles left on it, as Washington National Opera's lively revival at the Kennedy Center reconfirms. But the tender side of the work is what ultimately counts the most, and that's what this production brings out with particular effectiveness.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
No two adaptations of "Moby-Dick" are the same, but it's doubtful that any previous rendition featured a synchronized-swimming skit to Rick James' song "Super Freak," a chance to win a Groupon to a local hair salon or a cameo by Esther Williams. This eclectic twist on Melville's classic whaling novel came courtesy of the Baltimore-based performance group Fluid Movement in its 12th annual Water Ballet Spectacular on Saturday afternoon at Druid Hill Park Pool before a crowd of about 400. The troupe will repeat the performance at 5 p.m. Sunday at Druid Hill Park Pool with encores on Aug. 3 and 4 at Patterson Park Pool.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
No two adaptations of "Moby-Dick" are the same, but it's doubtful that any previous rendition featured a synchronized-swimming skit to Rick James' song "Super Freak," a chance to win a Groupon to a local hair salon or a cameo by Esther Williams. This eclectic twist on Melville's classic whaling novel came courtesy of the Baltimore-based performance group Fluid Movement in its 12th annual Water Ballet Spectacular on Saturday afternoon at Druid Hill Park Pool before a crowd of about 400. The troupe will repeat the performance at 5 p.m. Sunday at Druid Hill Park Pool with encores on Aug. 3 and 4 at Patterson Park Pool.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
David Poyer is a retired naval officer, and most of the 34 thrillers that he's written draw on his experience serving in the waters of the Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, Caribbean and Persian Gulf. So it was inevitable that at some point he'd take on the whale of all tales, "Moby Dick. " But try as Poyer might, he couldn't figure out how to write the sequel to Herman Melville's great American novel. Then one day, while the 63-year-old Poyer was teaching a creative writing course at Pennsylvania's Wilkes University, the solution came to him in a flash: "When I'm brainstorming with students, my brain doubles its IQ after a short period of time from my usually reptilian torpor at home," the 63-year-old Poyer said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | November 1, 2001
Around New Bedford, Mass., or wherever fans of Moby Dick gather, it has been a year of celebration, culminating Nov. 14 in the 150th anniversary of the American publication of Herman Melville's seafaring epic. There have been staged readings and musical productions, a children's book and even a solo performance of the story at the New Bedford Whaling Museum, in which a man lying prone on the stage interprets the indomitable white whale. On Nov. 14, the harborside museum will transform one of its galleries into a satellite U.S. Post Office issuing a commemorative cancellation mark.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | August 5, 1991
Herman Melville died 100 years ago next month. In his honor I reread ''Moby Dick'' this summer.I remembered it as a monster -- an endless assignment in one of my high school English classes. But now, 30 years later, I discovered the joy of reading what this man wrote.I took the book with me on my vacation at the ocean. On stormy days, I walked along the deserted beach and recited Melville's poetical prose out loud to the pounding sea.And heaved and heaved, still unrestingly heaved the black sea, as if its vast tides were a conscience; and the great mundane soul were in anguish and remorse for the long sin and suffering it had bred.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1995
The Moby Dick, the only ship in operation that is owned by Greenpeace -- the international environmental group -- is spending the holidays docked in Fells Point while its crew awaits instructions on its next mission.The ship, a converted 83-foot side trawler built in the Netherlands in 1959, arrived in Baltimore on Dec. 3 from New Bedford, Mass. It is working its way south after spending the summer and fall on a tour of the Great Lakes to warn of the harmful effects of toxic and radioactive pollution on humans and wildlife.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
Barbara Kees has bred her dream horse.The longtime Maryland horsewoman, who has done everything from competing in horse shows to riding in the Powder Puff Preakness, earned "black-type" for the first time yesterday with one of her homebreds.Mr. Moby Dick, the big, strong gray 3-year-old who once won the colt foal class at the Maryland State Fair, is as fast as he is handsome.In what was essentially a two-horse race, he put away pacesetter Majesty's Turn in mid-stretch at Pimlico and won the $44,375 Clever Foot Stakes.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | June 29, 1992
Who was the quirkiest horse at the Pimlico Race Course meet?Quite possibly, Mr. Moby Dick.The 3-year-old gelding, owned, trained and bred by Barbara Kees, is the kind of steady, talented young runner that every horseman would like to have in his barn.He won two of his first three starts at Pimlico and earned $21,900.But he also developed a post-race peculiarity. He collapses after the finish or in the winner's circle "sort of like James Brown used to do on stage after a concert," someone recently said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
David Poyer is a retired naval officer, and most of the 34 thrillers that he's written draw on his experience serving in the waters of the Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, Caribbean and Persian Gulf. So it was inevitable that at some point he'd take on the whale of all tales, "Moby Dick. " But try as Poyer might, he couldn't figure out how to write the sequel to Herman Melville's great American novel. Then one day, while the 63-year-old Poyer was teaching a creative writing course at Pennsylvania's Wilkes University, the solution came to him in a flash: "When I'm brainstorming with students, my brain doubles its IQ after a short period of time from my usually reptilian torpor at home," the 63-year-old Poyer said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By Paul West | paul.west@baltsun.com | April 4, 2010
For days last week, Democrats gleefully hammered away at the Republican National Committee's payment of $1,946 for "meals" at a West Hollywood strip club, which led to the firing of a committee staffer and continues to focus unwanted attention on National Chairman Michael Steele's management of the RNC. One jab, in the form of an MSNBC YouTube clip being circulated by the Democratic National Committee, highlights criticism of Steele by Tony Perkins,...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 4, 2010
S pringtime in Baltimore, and that means lacrosse, high school and collegiate. A friend of mine, Mary Garson, who lives near Boys' Latin School, told me that as soon as the double-whammy February snowstorms had ended, the lacrosse field at the school had been cleared of 50 inches of snow, even while many Baltimore streets still remained impassable. Garson reported that she could hear the screech of whistles and shouting as the team practiced for the season while surrounded by mountains of snow.
NEWS
June 4, 2008
The Cappies of Baltimore Awards Gala was held at the Hippodrome Theatre at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center in Baltimore on Sunday. Here are the winners: Critic Team: Glenelg Country Senior Critic: Maya Munoz, Glenelg Country Junior Critic: Liz Savopoulos, Reservoir Rising Critic: Chris Donaldson, River Hill Sound: Zach Brown, Wilde Lake, Moby Dick! The Musical Lighting: Dustin Doloff, Glenelg Country, Aesop's Foibles Sets: Scott Myers, Loren Scolaro, Atholton, The Diary of Anne Frank (revised)
NEWS
By Shreyo Banerjee and Shreyo Banerjee,special to the Sun | March 14, 2008
Funds are low, and St. Godley's Girls' School is on the brink of being closed down. Only a pocket-picking musical can save it. Enter ... Herman Melville? One can only speculate as to exactly what Robert Longden and Hereward Kaye were thinking when they conceptualized Moby Dick! The Musical -- "Pour me another, Frank," sounds likely -- but the students at Wilde Lake High School take the premise to heart and fuse it with a delicious insanity of their own to portray St. Godley's inspired theatrical production of Melville's classic.
FEATURES
By McClatchy-Tribune | January 3, 2008
The last commandment in Elmore Leonard's 10 Rules of Writing declares that an author should "try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip." The people at Phoenix Press think a number of classic authors were negligent in observing this rule. Anna Karenina, for instance, weighs in at a whopping 800-plus pages. Who can possibly hope to read that and still have time to watch Dancing with the Stars? "The great classics contain passionate romance, thrilling adventure, interesting characters, and unforgettable scenes and situations," Phoenix generously acknowledges.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1998
Too bad they couldn't cast a real whale.Determined to become a serious player in the TV movie biz, the USA cable network (in partnership with Hallmark Entertainment) sank some $20 million into a two-part adaptation of "Moby Dick." For their trouble, they got dynamic performances from Patrick Stewart as Ahab and Ted Levine as Starbuck, some fine shipboard atmosphere, and a giant rubber whale tail that looks as realistic and as menacing as a giant rubber whale tail.The filmmakers certainly had plenty to work with when it came to source material.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,STAFF WRITER | December 29, 1995
The Moby Dick looks quite at home moored in Fells Point on a glittery winter morning. The bow of the 83-foot Dutch trawler, overhauled by the international environmental group Greenpeace, is brightly striped and graced with a benign whale that bears little resemblance to the ship's malevolent namesake.On board, Greenpeace's six-member international crew relaxes between missions. These are the eco-buccaneers who have made Greenpeace legendary for its bold guerrilla tactics. They are people unfazed by spending months and years away from home, bunking in close quarters, living with uncertainty and risk.
NEWS
By Debby Applegate and Debby Applegate,Los Angeles Times | July 15, 2007
Leviathan The History of Whaling in America By Eric Jay Dolin W.W. Norton / 480 pages / $27.95 On Jan. 3, 1841, a 21-year-old schoolteacher named Herman Melville set sail aboard the Acushnet, a Yankee whale ship headed for the South Seas. After 15 grueling months, Melville jumped ship in the cannibal-infested Marquesas Islands, figuring that even being eaten would be better than life on a whaler. Still, this failed voyage had a remarkable effect on American culture. Inspired by true stories of vengeful whales - particularly the sinking of the Essex by an enraged sperm whale and the exploits of an albino whale nicknamed Mocha Dick, legendary for his ferocious attacks on whale ships off Chile - Melville's tale of Captain Ahab's suicidal obsession with killing the white whale Moby-Dick has become a symbol of humankind's doomed struggle to subdue nature.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | January 18, 2007
Captain Ahab assembled the crew of the Pequod and told them that they could not afford to fail in the quest to kill the great white whale, and so he had come up with a plan. The Pequod lay becalmed on a glassy sea, the sails hung loose, the ship drifting with the current. The Captain had mulled over the recommendations of the Moby Dick Study Group and rejected them. "If we turn back to New Bedford now, as the Old Ones suggest, we risk the loss of the high seas." And so he had decided to put 10 oarsmen in a longboat and to row ahead, towing the ship, "surging" it forward.
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