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By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
The new music venue in the Inner Harbor, Baltimore Soundstage , has scheduled its first show for September 6. Big Sam's Funk Nation, a New Orleans funk band, will play the venue's soft opening. Edwin McCain is scheduled to play the day after. The September 6 show costs $15 via Ticketfly. Soundstage also announced a couple of other new shows today, though not at their venue. The promoter will present John Waters' annual "A Naughty Christmas" at the Lyric Theater on December 21. Tickets start at $25 and go on sale Thursday.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
No two adaptations of "Moby-Dick" are the same, but it's doubtful that any previous rendition featured a synchronized-swimming skit to Rick James' song "Super Freak," a chance to win a Groupon to a local hair salon or a cameo by Esther Williams. This eclectic twist on Melville's classic whaling novel came courtesy of the Baltimore-based performance group Fluid Movement in its 12th annual Water Ballet Spectacular on Saturday afternoon at Druid Hill Park Pool before a crowd of about 400. The troupe will repeat the performance at 5 p.m. Sunday at Druid Hill Park Pool with encores on Aug. 3 and 4 at Patterson Park Pool.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 23, 1994
Even though he's one of the biggest recording stars theAmerican rave scene has produced, Moby is somewhat disenchanted with dance music -- so much so that he hesitates to call himself a dance-music artist."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
David Poyer is a retired naval officer, and most of the 34 thrillers that he's written draw on his experience serving in the waters of the Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, Caribbean and Persian Gulf. So it was inevitable that at some point he'd take on the whale of all tales, "Moby Dick. " But try as Poyer might, he couldn't figure out how to write the sequel to Herman Melville's great American novel. Then one day, while the 63-year-old Poyer was teaching a creative writing course at Pennsylvania's Wilkes University, the solution came to him in a flash: "When I'm brainstorming with students, my brain doubles its IQ after a short period of time from my usually reptilian torpor at home," the 63-year-old Poyer said in a telephone interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 31, 2005
Hotel is billed as the first Moby album that doesn't contain any vocal samples. Well, back to the drawing board. Moby is many things: a true pop-music eclectic, a sonic wizard, a distinctive songwriter, a politically engaged activist, a bridge between the worlds of rock and electronic music. But he's not much of a singer, and by making his detached, deadpan delivery the dominant voice on his new album, he leaves most of the songs as surface decorations, lacking the kind of emotional soul singing (sampled or not)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 25, 1999
Bandleader, DJ and multi-instrumentalist Moby calls his new album "Play." And if his day-to-day life had a title, it would probably be "Fly." "Our touring schedule has been really scattershot," he says, over the phone from a hotel just outside Paris. "Like, we did two and a half months in the States, and then we did three weeks in Europe. Then two weeks in the States. Then four days in Europe. Then 10 days in the States. "We just finished Italy and France, and now we're going to Thailand, and then Australia and New Zealand, then back to America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 29, 1993
It's not that hard to figure out how Moby got to be the best-known name in techno. Unlike the other acts he's touring with in the See The Light festival -- a lineup including Orbital, Aphex Twin and Vapour Space -- Moby hasn't cultivated anonymity. He may not have been born Moby (his birth certificate shows him to be Richard Melville Hall), but he doesn't hide behind the name, either."I like that aspect of Aphex Twin and Orbital, that there's a little confusion about them, and there aren't pictures distributed," he says over the phone from his Manhattan apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 10, 1993
MOVEMoby (Elektra 61568)AMBIENTMoby (Instinct 253)It's no wonder that Moby has emerged as the first true star of techno music. Not only does he have the right combination of skills, being a keyboardist, composer and producer, but he's also blessed with sufficient range to make what he does as listenable as it is danceable. "Move," for example, spans almost the whole techno spectrum in six songs, offering pop exuberance in "Move (You Make Me Feel So Good)," a trance-inducing pulse in the percussive "Morning Dove," retro thrills in "Move (Disco Threat)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | September 17, 2009
A couple of years ago, Moby was at the MTV Music Awards when he had a career-changing epiphany. "I was sitting between Christina Aguilera and Ludacris, and I had this moment where I just started thinking to myself, 'What the hell am I doing here?' " he said. "Nothing against Ludacris and Christina Aguilera, but it's not a world I want to have anything to do with." At the time, Moby was very much a part of that world. A longtime staple on the dance music scene, Moby, who performs at Rams Head Live tonight, became an international pop star seemingly overnight with his 1999 effort "Play."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1999
Herman Melville(1819-1891)At the age of 22 Melville took a sailing voyage to the South Seas on which he joined a mutiny and was sent to a Tahitian jail. The experiences he gained from the trip provided material for his first two novels, "Typee" and "Omoo."Melville went on to write about the sea. His epic, "Moby-Dick," features a protagonist, Captain Ahab, in obsessive pursuit of a great white whale. The book was first published in London and in America a month later. "Moby-Dick" gave Melville's reputation acclaim only many years after his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
Washington D.C. is getting its own Starscape. Called Fall Massive, the indoor electronic music festival, billed as DC's largest, is set for November 26 at RFK Stadium and boasts dozens of top DJs, including Moby, Diplo, Martin Solveig and Baltimore's own Scottie B. The one-day festival, which starts at 4 p.m. and ends at 2 a.m., is from Steez Promo and Ultraworld, the promoters behind Starscape, which just celebrated its 13th year....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
The new music venue in the Inner Harbor, Baltimore Soundstage , has scheduled its first show for September 6. Big Sam's Funk Nation, a New Orleans funk band, will play the venue's soft opening. Edwin McCain is scheduled to play the day after. The September 6 show costs $15 via Ticketfly. Soundstage also announced a couple of other new shows today, though not at their venue. The promoter will present John Waters' annual "A Naughty Christmas" at the Lyric Theater on December 21. Tickets start at $25 and go on sale Thursday.
NEWS
By Paul West | paul.west@baltsun.com | April 4, 2010
For days last week, Democrats gleefully hammered away at the Republican National Committee's payment of $1,946 for "meals" at a West Hollywood strip club, which led to the firing of a committee staffer and continues to focus unwanted attention on National Chairman Michael Steele's management of the RNC. One jab, in the form of an MSNBC YouTube clip being circulated by the Democratic National Committee, highlights criticism of Steele by Tony Perkins,...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 4, 2010
S pringtime in Baltimore, and that means lacrosse, high school and collegiate. A friend of mine, Mary Garson, who lives near Boys' Latin School, told me that as soon as the double-whammy February snowstorms had ended, the lacrosse field at the school had been cleared of 50 inches of snow, even while many Baltimore streets still remained impassable. Garson reported that she could hear the screech of whistles and shouting as the team practiced for the season while surrounded by mountains of snow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | September 17, 2009
A couple of years ago, Moby was at the MTV Music Awards when he had a career-changing epiphany. "I was sitting between Christina Aguilera and Ludacris, and I had this moment where I just started thinking to myself, 'What the hell am I doing here?' " he said. "Nothing against Ludacris and Christina Aguilera, but it's not a world I want to have anything to do with." At the time, Moby was very much a part of that world. A longtime staple on the dance music scene, Moby, who performs at Rams Head Live tonight, became an international pop star seemingly overnight with his 1999 effort "Play."
NEWS
By Debby Applegate and Debby Applegate,Los Angeles Times | July 15, 2007
Leviathan The History of Whaling in America By Eric Jay Dolin W.W. Norton / 480 pages / $27.95 On Jan. 3, 1841, a 21-year-old schoolteacher named Herman Melville set sail aboard the Acushnet, a Yankee whale ship headed for the South Seas. After 15 grueling months, Melville jumped ship in the cannibal-infested Marquesas Islands, figuring that even being eaten would be better than life on a whaler. Still, this failed voyage had a remarkable effect on American culture. Inspired by true stories of vengeful whales - particularly the sinking of the Essex by an enraged sperm whale and the exploits of an albino whale nicknamed Mocha Dick, legendary for his ferocious attacks on whale ships off Chile - Melville's tale of Captain Ahab's suicidal obsession with killing the white whale Moby-Dick has become a symbol of humankind's doomed struggle to subdue nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bob Suter and Bob Suter,Newsday | October 25, 1999
"Why is the sky blue?" a young boy asks his newspaper-absorbed father."Why is the sky blue?" the father repeats reflexively. "Well the sky's blue," he continues in a confident paternal tone, "because ... ." He goes no further.Dad, the repository of all knowledge, doesn't know the answer.This old TV ad sold a lot of encyclopedias in its day, but try sending your kid off for a little quality time with the old Britannica today. Times have changed and, in the age of the Internet, so has the way we get information.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | October 4, 2006
At 65 pounds, 8 ounces, Moby Catfish is every inch the new state record, from its dinner-plate-sized tail to its massive bewhiskered head. It swims by itself in an aerated pool marked: "Please leave me alone." Too late. The blue catfish, caught Saturday on the Maryland side of the Potomac River, just across from Mount Vernon, surpassed the old record by more than 12 pounds. Its captor, Josh Fitchett of Montpelier, Va., is a competitive bass fisherman who turned to bigger fish just a few years ago and was named 2004 Angler of the Year by the Virginia Catfish Association.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | October 4, 2006
At 65 pounds, 8 ounces, Moby Catfish is every inch the new state record, from its dinner-plate-sized tail to its massive bewhiskered head. It swims by itself in an aerated pool marked: "Please leave me alone." Too late. The blue catfish, caught Saturday on the Maryland side of the Potomac River, just across from Mount Vernon, surpassed the old record by more than 12 pounds. Its captor, Josh Fitchett of Montpelier, Va., is a competitive bass fisherman who turned to bigger fish just a few years ago and was named 2004 Angler of the Year by the Virginia Catfish Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 31, 2005
Hotel is billed as the first Moby album that doesn't contain any vocal samples. Well, back to the drawing board. Moby is many things: a true pop-music eclectic, a sonic wizard, a distinctive songwriter, a politically engaged activist, a bridge between the worlds of rock and electronic music. But he's not much of a singer, and by making his detached, deadpan delivery the dominant voice on his new album, he leaves most of the songs as surface decorations, lacking the kind of emotional soul singing (sampled or not)
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