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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 12, 2003
TEL AVIV, Israel - Three people were killed and dozens more were injured yesterday in Tel Aviv when a bomb exploded at a currency exchange shop in what police suspect was an attempt by Israeli mobsters to assassinate a rival kingpin. The attack marked the third time in four months that bystanders have been killed in mob-related violence. Police, overwhelmed by Palestinian suicide bombings, vowed to strike back. "What's new and worrying to us is that many innocent people are dying," Israeli police spokesman Gil Kleiman said.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2010
Cops don't seem to like getting caught on camera. Anthony John Graber III of Harford County is finding that out the hard way. His rapid and possibly reckless motorcycle trip up Interstate 95 has landed the systems engineer in more trouble than a speeding ticket. The 24-year-old Graber is facing criminal charges after the Internet posting of a video he recorded on his helmet-mounted camera during a March 5 traffic stop. When a state trooper saw the 23-second clip on YouTube 10 days after the stop, police got a warrant, searched Graber's parents' house in Abingdon, seized his equipment and charged him with violating the state's unusually restrictive wiretapping law. It's illegal in Maryland to capture audio without the other person's consent, and Trooper J.D. Uhler said he didn't know he was being recorded.
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FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 15, 1991
From the silver screen, some fashion wisdom to live by: Don't dress "like a schmuck."In the new testosterone-in-tweeds epic "Mobsters," gangster rookie Christian Slater, already quite rakish in tab-collared shirts and baggy pants, learns this valuable lesson from shadowy mobster F. Murray Abraham.Mr. Abraham tells Mr. Slater what America is really all about -- money -- and says Mr. Slater will never make it big.Why?"Because you dress like a schmuck," Mr. Abraham says, playing Mr. Blackwell to Mr. Slater's Princess Anne.
TRAVEL
October 8, 2006
NEW YORK GATHER 'ROUND, BOYS AND GIRLS, for a titillating Halloween tale: The Petrified Body of Lake Placid. DEVILS ON THE DEEP BLUE SEA Plume / $16 Usually people going on cruises bring along guidebooks or other light reading. But for those who want a bit of history on the side -- and yet still want to stick to a cruising theme -- Devils on the Deep Blue Sea just might be the perfect choice. Author Kristoffer A. Garin tells the story behind the cruise-ship empires with intelligence and humor, and explains how cruising emerged as a successful industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 26, 2003
Mobsters and Gangsters: Organized Crime in America from Al Capone to Tony Soprano, edited by Life Magazine, 128 pages, $19.95. The remnants of the legendary Life magazine are now an occasional book publishing imprint, and its latest production is this gallivant through its title subject. The pictures are the heart of it, of course, and they are splendid, if you like the looks of gangsters, dead or alive. Among the earliest are the Daltons, all four of them shot down in 1892, as the gang "poses posthumously."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2010
Cops don't seem to like getting caught on camera. Anthony John Graber III of Harford County is finding that out the hard way. His rapid and possibly reckless motorcycle trip up Interstate 95 has landed the systems engineer in more trouble than a speeding ticket. The 24-year-old Graber is facing criminal charges after the Internet posting of a video he recorded on his helmet-mounted camera during a March 5 traffic stop. When a state trooper saw the 23-second clip on YouTube 10 days after the stop, police got a warrant, searched Graber's parents' house in Abingdon, seized his equipment and charged him with violating the state's unusually restrictive wiretapping law. It's illegal in Maryland to capture audio without the other person's consent, and Trooper J.D. Uhler said he didn't know he was being recorded.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Sun Staff | August 8, 1999
It's summer, it's hot and noisy and nettle-and-insect-ridden, it's Knapp's Point, on the Magothy hard by Chesapeake Bay. It's a new Barbara Lee crime novel, "Dead Man's Fingers" (St. Martin's, 276 pages, $22.95). Blistering days, beer-soaked nights; alike in the city visitors and the year-rounders, there's enough irritability to keep the police very busy.Then during the Glorious Fourth fireworks, Lauren DeWitt is found dead on a pier. She's a young outsider making an environmental movie about the damage that bottom-line developers are causing to waterside habitat.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 26, 1991
''Mobsters'' is a bloody little fairy tale that makes good guys out of Lucky Luciano, Frank Costello, Bugsy Siegel and Meyer Lansky.According to the film, a largely plodding affair, they were just four kids who liked to kill people once in a while.The real villain of the piece is Mad Dog Coll, who may or may not have known these buys, but what's it matter? This is, after all, a fantasy.''Mobsters,'' shot in California, takes place in New York (1917 to 1931) where the four leading characters begin their association as boys.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Staff writer | April 21, 1992
Donald John Angelini, one of six organized crime figures tied to a Brooklyn Park bingo hall, pleaded guilty yesterday to conspiring to launder nearly $2 million in ill-gotten money through the hall.Angelini, known as "The Wizard of Odds" in Chicago, became the fifth mobster to admit he schemed with the others in 1986 to funnel profits from gambling, loan-sharking, robbery and interstate transportation of stolen property through Bingo World, which Stephen B. Paskind, a Florida bingo operator, was buying at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | July 26, 1991
One of the most admirable things about "The Godfather" was its understatement -- a raised eyebrow from Marlon Brando; a clever, almost imperceptible camera movement from Francis Ford Coppola.No one connected with "Mobsters" seems to appreciate that fact. The quartet of young stars -- Christian Slater, Patrick Dempsey, Richard Grieco, Costas Mandylor -- as well as veterans Anthony Quinn, F. Murray Abraham and Michael Gambon -- avoid any semblance of subtlety. Director Michael Karbelnikoff and composer Michael Small seem downright allergic to anything softer than overstatement.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 12, 2003
TEL AVIV, Israel - Three people were killed and dozens more were injured yesterday in Tel Aviv when a bomb exploded at a currency exchange shop in what police suspect was an attempt by Israeli mobsters to assassinate a rival kingpin. The attack marked the third time in four months that bystanders have been killed in mob-related violence. Police, overwhelmed by Palestinian suicide bombings, vowed to strike back. "What's new and worrying to us is that many innocent people are dying," Israeli police spokesman Gil Kleiman said.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2003
BOSTON - University of Massachusetts President William M. Bulger resigned yesterday, under pressure for failing to aid in a federal investigation of his mobster brother. After insisting for months that he would not yield to demands that he give up the $356,000-a-year post he has held since 1997, Bulger tendered his resignation at a routine meeting of the university's board of trustees at the Lowell campus. Although all but one had backed Bulger, 69, in a bitter showdown with Gov. Mitt Romney, the trustees voted "with regret" to accept Bulger's decision, offering him a standing ovation and a severance package of just under $1 million.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - For more than 40 years, William Bulger changed the subject when his brother's name was raised. That silence was broken yesterday when Bulger, president of the University of Massachusetts, testified before angry members of Congress about James "Whitey" Bulger, a Boston crime lord who disappeared in 1995 just as he was about to be indicted on murder, racketeering and extortion charges. William Bulger, the former president of the Massachusetts Senate and one of the most powerful political figures in the Northeast, denied knowing his brother's whereabouts, or having information that could help authorities find him. After invoking the Fifth Amendment and refusing to answer questions at a hearing in December, Bulger agreed to testify yesterday only under a grant of immunity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 26, 2003
Mobsters and Gangsters: Organized Crime in America from Al Capone to Tony Soprano, edited by Life Magazine, 128 pages, $19.95. The remnants of the legendary Life magazine are now an occasional book publishing imprint, and its latest production is this gallivant through its title subject. The pictures are the heart of it, of course, and they are splendid, if you like the looks of gangsters, dead or alive. Among the earliest are the Daltons, all four of them shot down in 1892, as the gang "poses posthumously."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 2002
NEW YORK - An alleged Russian organized-crime figure was charged yesterday with conspiring to fix the pairs figure skating and ice dancing competitions at the recent Salt Lake Winter Olympics, which were dominated by a judging scandal in the pairs competition. Alimzhan Tokhtakhounov - who was arrested by Italian police at his resort home in Forte dei Marmi - appeared to have a singular motivation: getting a visa to return to France, where he once lived. The U.S. attorney in Manhattan alleged in an unsealed criminal complaint that Tokhtakhounov conceived and directed a scheme with a second Russian mobster and a member of the Russian Skating Federation to secure a gold medal for the Russian pairs skaters and for the French ice dancers, one of whom is Russian.
TOPIC
By Eric Dezenhall | July 29, 2001
FOLKS LIKE vice because it's fabulous. That's right, gambling is a kick, cocktails taste good and porno flicks are arousing. Is it OK to say that out loud? Sure, because I don't do these things, it's other people. But the numbers from the business section and the smiles on American faces suggest a whole lot of other people. Last year, according to industry statistics, Americans spent $95 billion on alcoholic drinks, $10 billion on X-rated movies and, brace yourself, more than half a trillion in wagers.
FEATURES
By Valli Herman and Valli Herman,Los Angeles Daily News | January 2, 1991
THESE GUYS are definitely dressed to kill.The mobsters are back, and they aren't content to rule movie screens. They're gonna get you guys in your closets and stuff you back into sharp-as-knives suits.Gangster glamour has been shooting from screens with summer's cartoonish "Dick Tracy," fall's stylish "GoodFellas" and this season's "The Godfather Part III." In a chicken-or-the-egg scenario, the exquisitely garish tailoring of many mobsters has subtly influenced current men's fashions, which have been looking rather like the 1940s, say industry observers.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | December 2, 1992
BELGRADE -- Belgrade schoolboys have a new hero. They're calling him their James Dean. He died young last month, assassinated Chicago gangster-style at age 22. Five bullets were pumped into him when he answered the door of his luxury hotel room dressed in his trademark heavy gold chain and leather jacket.Tributes to Alexander Knezevic filled the death-notice pages of Belgrade's newspapers. A new pop song: "It's Hard to Live" has been devoted to him. Legend and reality already are blurring, but he is credited with exploits from running protection rackets worth hundreds of thousands of dollars to robbing Belgrade's main casino to being a killer in a Serbian paramilitary group.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 30, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - You don't need a ticket for the hottest show in Philadelphia this summer - just the patience to stand in line through two metal detectors, figure out who's who among the characters sucking Life Savers at the defense table, and listen to more racy language than in an episode of "The Sopranos." The mob is on trial here - again - and has been for more than three months: specifically, reputed mob boss Joseph "Skinny Joey" Merlino and six codefendants, among them Angelo Lutz, a 5-foot-4, 400-pound reputed bookmaker known as the "Golden Buddha" after he appeared in a New Year's Day parade shirtless and painted gold.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Sun Staff | August 8, 1999
It's summer, it's hot and noisy and nettle-and-insect-ridden, it's Knapp's Point, on the Magothy hard by Chesapeake Bay. It's a new Barbara Lee crime novel, "Dead Man's Fingers" (St. Martin's, 276 pages, $22.95). Blistering days, beer-soaked nights; alike in the city visitors and the year-rounders, there's enough irritability to keep the police very busy.Then during the Glorious Fourth fireworks, Lauren DeWitt is found dead on a pier. She's a young outsider making an environmental movie about the damage that bottom-line developers are causing to waterside habitat.
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