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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
The Maryland House of Delegates approved a bill Thursday that would require retailers to tell customers when they track their movements and habits via mobile phones. "It is alarming how much information a store can gather from your phone when you walk in the door," said Del. Sam Arora, a Rockville Democrat. "At the very minimum, we deserve to know when stores are tracking information from our phones. " Arora, a sponsor of the bill, said an estimated 1,000 retailers already use technology to track shoppers' movements through stores using mobile phone signals.
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NEWS
By Cathy Drinkwater Better | August 4, 2014
Originally, mobile phones were the size, shape and heft of your average brick. People would walk down the street yelling, "Guess where I'm calling from!" into the mouthpiece. Now we have "smartphones. " Ironically, it's the user who has to be smart to understand all those apps (I think "apps" is short for "appetizers") or you can get an 8-year-old explain it to you. They miniaturized smartphones into video wrist-phones; then enlarged them again so people could watch movies. I wondered why anyone would watch a two-hour movie on a cellphone - until I spent an afternoon at the DMV. Now I get it. Yet, with all these advances, no one has figured out how to make calling customer service painless.
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NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | April 16, 1995
JERUSALEM -- Oren Most knew he had a hot product when the salesmen caught a little old lady hiring a blind man to butt his way to the front of the line.She had paid the fellow $100 to buy her a mobile telephone, said Mr. Most.She wasn't the most insistent customer. After Mr. Most's company, Cellcom, opened its stores for business in late December, unruly crowds clamored to buy the phones.One impatient customer barged in and threatened to blow up the store with a grenade, said Mr. Most, vice president of marketing and sales.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
The Maryland House of Delegates approved a bill Thursday that would require retailers to tell customers when they track their movements and habits via mobile phones. "It is alarming how much information a store can gather from your phone when you walk in the door," said Del. Sam Arora, a Rockville Democrat. "At the very minimum, we deserve to know when stores are tracking information from our phones. " Arora, a sponsor of the bill, said an estimated 1,000 retailers already use technology to track shoppers' movements through stores using mobile phone signals.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1994
TOKYO -- Akihabara is the self-proclaimed electric city of Japan and the world. The small Tokyo district has hundreds of electronics stores, selling innumerable types of Walkmans, televisions, stereos and, increasingly, computers. But one item that cannot be found is a mobile telephone.The absence, a telltale element in the major trade war brewing between Japan and the United States, is particularly striking because Japan was the first country to introduce cellular service back in 1979. But according to Motorola Inc., the U.S. company that has become the focal point of the dispute, stiff regulations and complex decisions by the Japanese government and private Japanese companies have stifled development.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
The cost of having a mobile or car telephone in Harford County is about to get a little more expensive.Responding to the proliferation of mobile phones, the Harford County Council approved adding a 50-cent monthly charge to all mobile phone users in the county to help pay for 911 services.The law, passed unanimously Tuesday night, will go into effect in January.The the same increase is being considered by several other jurisdictions in Maryland.The new fee should generate about $100,000 in additional revenue for the county, said Larry Klimovitz, director of administration.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | January 15, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Del. Carolyn J. B. Howard was outraged when she got a letter from her cellular phone company that said her "unlimited time" would be limited and her "prime-time" hours would be trimmed. This happened three weeks after the Prince George's County Democrat signed up for a car phone.Del. Leslie Hutchinson, D-Baltimore County, is incensed that her cellular company doesn't itemize charges on her monthly account. "To even dispute your bill is impossible," she said.And Del. K. Bennett Bozman, D-Worcester County, is upset that his constituents in Worcester County have no choices when it comes to cellular service: Only one company reaches the Eastern Shore, or Western Maryland, for that matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 1, 2004
"In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes," goes the legendary quote from 1960s artist and self-promoter Andy Warhol. We're now living in the future, and it seems everybody will indeed get to be on camera for 15 seconds, if not 15 minutes, thanks to a new generation of mobile phones that shoot short video clips in addition to snapping still pictures. By year-end, the five biggest wireless carriers - AT&T Wireless, Cingular Wireless, Sprint PCS, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless - will all offer video recording and messaging.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Oldham and Jennifer Oldham,Los Angeles Times | July 19, 1999
Mobile phones make it easy to reach out and touch someone. From the grocery store. The commuter train. A public restroom. Or even a wedding.Once a status symbol, mobile phones have become a necessity for millions of Americans. Like many new technologies when they move into the mainstream, there are no social norms dictating how and where to use a mobile phone.And it shows.Second-hand cell phone conversations are fast replacing second-hand smoke as public enemy No. 1 in crowded venues. Fed up with customers with phones attached to their ears, restaurants, theaters, colleges and even churches have taken steps to ban mobile phone use. Those who ignore the new policies face the wrath of other patrons and often are asked to conduct their conversation outside.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 27, 2003
LONDON - As it struggles for growth in the no-holds-barred mobile phone market, Nokia of Finland, the world's biggest cell phone manufacturer, announced changes in its top management yesterday, spurring speculation that it may be preparing to change its chief executive. For the first time, a management shuffle at Nokia brought in an American, Rick Simonson, 45, to the top ranks of the company. The changes come as the company seeks to reposition itself at a time when the consumer cell phone industry, particularly in the Western world, has become saturated, with most potential customers already owning a mobile handset.
NEWS
By Mark Bowles | September 17, 2013
Most people have a handful of old, used cell phones sitting around at home. And for years, there's been no way for people to safely and conveniently recycle or resell their old phones for cash. They'd have to sell their old phones online or on Craigslist and hope that the transaction with a stranger happened safely. But usually, the phones would just sit in drawers or be thrown in the trash, polluting soil and water supplies. Finding a way to responsibly recycle a phone for cash was inconvenient and sometimes unsafe.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Take a line-by-line look at your cellphone bill - all dozen or so pages. See a $9.99 charge for horoscopes, flirting tips or some such thing that you didn't request? If so, you've been crammed. Once only a big problem with landline telephones, cramming - the placement of unauthorized charges on phone bills by outsiders - is gaining a foothold in the mobile-phone marketplace, regulators and consumer advocates say. Indeed, some landline crammers have migrated to wireless schemes as consumers switch to smartphones.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
Just in time for the Grand Prix of Baltimore on Labor Day weekend, a local technology company is offering spectators a way to keep their mobile phone batteries charged as they watch the races. NV3 Technologies, a Canton-based maker of rapid-charging kiosks for cellphones, will make available a custom-made trailer that can charge up to 72 mobile devices at one time. It will be located on Ravens Walk, which connects Orioles Park at Camden Yards with M&T Bank Stadium. Soon, NV3 also will launch a pilot program with Arrow Cab, a Baltimore taxi company, where another version of its battery-charging technology will be installed in the backs of 10 cabs.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
From texting to browsing the Web to eating in the car, driver distraction has become a growing problem on the roadways. In 2010, more than 3,000 people died in accidents believed to have been caused by distracted driving, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. In December, the National Transportation Safety Board recommended a nationwide ban on using smartphones while driving, including the use of hand-held devices for non-emergencies. It's against the law to talk on a hand-held phone while driving in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
With a tap on his smartphone, University of Maryland student Shiv Krishnamoorthy can instantly alert police as he walks through the dimly lit corners of the College Park campus — and share with them his precise location, plus live video and audio. The app, which was developed by a university computer science professor and a team of students in conjunction with campus police, is the first of its kind in the small but growing field of smartphone apps for campus security. M-Urgency will be available to Maryland students, faculty and staff early next month.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2011
Ciena Corp. on Wednesday posted lower-than-expected earnings for the second quarter of 2011, driving its shares lower in Wall Street trading. The Linthicum-based company, which makes optical networking gear for telecommunications providers, reported a loss of $22.4 million, or 24 cents per share, on revenues of $417.9 million for the quarter ended April 30. Wall Street analysts had expected a loss of 18 cents per share, according to MarketWatch....
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 27, 2006
Verizon Wireless, among the nation's most widely advertised brands, is poised to become the advertising medium itself. Beginning early next year, Verizon Wireless will allow placement of banner advertisements on news, weather, sports and other Internet sites that users visit and display on their mobile phones, company executives said. The development is a substantive and symbolic advance toward the widespread appearance of marketing messages on the smallest of screens. Advertisers have been increasing the amount they spent on mobile marketing, despite lingering questions about the effectiveness of ads on portable phones.
BUSINESS
By Eric Benderoff and Mike Hughlett and Eric Benderoff and Mike Hughlett,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 2, 2007
CHICAGO -- Mobile phone companies want to make it so easy to find that pumpkin patch in the middle of farm country that you will never have to call for directions. Just pull out your phone and look at a map. Yesterday, Nokia - the world's largest phone maker - made a huge play for this emerging technology by agreeing to buy digital mapmaker Navteq Corp. for $8.1 billion. It's a bet that the majority of consumers soon will expect their cell phones to not only make calls and take photographs but to lead the way to the nearest coffee shop.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2010
Looking to better manage your diet, your vital signs or a chronic disease? There's a mobile app for that. One of the current buzzwords in health care technology is "mHealth," for mobile health. At its simplest, the concept encompasses regular text messages to pregnant mothers charting the baby's growth. But boosters envision more complex applications that would integrate medical devices, wireless networks and mobile phones to reach large segments of the population and help them manage their health and ailments.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2010
WellDoc Inc., a Baltimore health care technology company, has hit some key milestones since it was launched five years ago. It has raised millions in venture capital, received FDA approval for its mobile phone-based diabetes management software, and even expanded operations to India, where diabetes is a burgeoning problem. But perhaps the company's biggest news is its recent partnership with AT&T Inc. The telecommunications giant launched a new business segment last week that will focus on technology solutions for the health care industry.
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