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NEWS
October 8, 1991
The Anne Arundel County Department of Health, in cooperation with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and Anne Arundel County schools, is making second-dose measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)vaccine available free to middle school students countywide.During October, the county Department of Health will sponsor free MMR immunization clinics in middle and junior high schoolsaround the county. Currently, all students must have had at leastone dose of MMR before entering school.
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NEWS
By Margaret Dunkle | July 11, 2011
The topics of vaccines and vaccine safety spark emotional outbursts at scientific meetings and family dinner tables alike. But many of these debates are remarkably fact-free. Surprisingly few people — not just concerned parents but also doctors, policymakers and even immunization experts — can answer this seemingly simple question: How many immunizations does the federal government recommend for every child during the first two years of life? The answer is important because most states, including Maryland, faithfully follow the recommendations of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, codifying CDC guidelines into requirements for children to enroll in school, kindergarten, preschool and child care.
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NEWS
September 13, 1993
Because of changes in immunization requirements, students entering kindergarten, first, sixth and seventh grades are required to show proof of two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR).The MMR and other immunizations necessary for children will be offered during extended hours at various County Health Centers from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.The clinics will be held at:* Brooklyn Park Health Center, 300 Hammonds Lane -- 222-6620.L * Glen Burnie Health Center, 416 A Street, S.W. -- 222-6633.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | October 10, 2009
Alexandra McKinty will not be putting her 13-month-old in line for the swine flu vaccine. Madelyn, she says, has already had too many shots in her short life. And Loretta Jergensen of Parkville is worried that the vaccine wasn't adequately tested, so her two children also will probably pass. The two mothers illustrate the problem public health officials are having despite an all-out offensive - including an appearance Friday by U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius at a Prince George's County school.
NEWS
By Sara Oppenheim and Sara Oppenheim,Contributing writer | January 16, 1991
Fearing even a small outbreak of highly contagious measles, health officials will offer free combination vaccinations for measles, mumps and rubella to all sixth-grade students in the county.The programwill include all 10 public middle schools as well as private schoolsin the county and will begin Jan. 17.Students must have received at least one MMR shot to enter school. But health officials now recommend that children receive a second immunization, preferably during their sixth-grade year, because the early vaccination is about 95 percent effective, said Ruth Talbot, assistant director of the Howard County Bureau of Personal Health.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | September 22, 1992
About 150 sixth-graders and a handful of kindergarten students in the county yesterday had not yet received their second measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) immunization.However, school officials, who had set Sept. 21 as the immunization deadline for all kindergarten and sixth-grade students, said they expected nearly all of the 150 students will be immunized by the start of the school day today."There are a number of students who are not yet in compliance," said school spokeswoman Jane Doyle.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | January 10, 1991
Spurred by a rash of measles and mumps outbreaks in recent years, county health officials plan to offer free booster vaccinations to all seventh-graders this spring.The Anne Arundel Health Department received 4,746 doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine through a federal contract aimed at stemming a nationwide upsurge in measles cases.Last April, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta reported a two-thirds increase in measles cases across the country. Maryland witnessed a parallel upswing, with 212 measles cases reported in 1990, compared to 113 cases in 1989.
NEWS
By Margaret Dunkle | July 11, 2011
The topics of vaccines and vaccine safety spark emotional outbursts at scientific meetings and family dinner tables alike. But many of these debates are remarkably fact-free. Surprisingly few people — not just concerned parents but also doctors, policymakers and even immunization experts — can answer this seemingly simple question: How many immunizations does the federal government recommend for every child during the first two years of life? The answer is important because most states, including Maryland, faithfully follow the recommendations of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, codifying CDC guidelines into requirements for children to enroll in school, kindergarten, preschool and child care.
NEWS
August 4, 1991
A recent outbreak in Maryland, including several cases in Carroll County, has raised concern about meales.Measles is caused by a virus. Common symptoms are high fever, upper respiratory symptoms and a rash.Every child should be vaccinated at 15 months. A second measles shot is recommended at age 12. The shots are usually given as MMR -- measles, mumps and rubella vaccine.More than one-third of cases occur in people 15 years and older. People born after 1957 should receive a booster MMR shot; most of those born before 1957 are considered immune to the virus.
NEWS
June 1, 2009
People believe all kinds of strange things, and most of the time it doesn't matter. Trouble arises, however, when their odd beliefs affect other people's health. Such, unfortunately, is the case with parents who choose not to immunize their children against diseases that killed and crippled millions before vaccines were developed and made widely available. The anti-vaccine movement is driven largely by parents who believe that certain vaccines can cause autism, a suspicion that has been thoroughly investigated and authoritatively debunked.
NEWS
June 1, 2009
People believe all kinds of strange things, and most of the time it doesn't matter. Trouble arises, however, when their odd beliefs affect other people's health. Such, unfortunately, is the case with parents who choose not to immunize their children against diseases that killed and crippled millions before vaccines were developed and made widely available. The anti-vaccine movement is driven largely by parents who believe that certain vaccines can cause autism, a suspicion that has been thoroughly investigated and authoritatively debunked.
NEWS
September 13, 1993
Because of changes in immunization requirements, students entering kindergarten, first, sixth and seventh grades are required to show proof of two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR).The MMR and other immunizations necessary for children will be offered during extended hours at various County Health Centers from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.The clinics will be held at:* Brooklyn Park Health Center, 300 Hammonds Lane -- 222-6620.L * Glen Burnie Health Center, 416 A Street, S.W. -- 222-6633.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | September 22, 1992
About 150 sixth-graders and a handful of kindergarten students in the county yesterday had not yet received their second measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) immunization.However, school officials, who had set Sept. 21 as the immunization deadline for all kindergarten and sixth-grade students, said they expected nearly all of the 150 students will be immunized by the start of the school day today."There are a number of students who are not yet in compliance," said school spokeswoman Jane Doyle.
NEWS
October 8, 1991
The Anne Arundel County Department of Health, in cooperation with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and Anne Arundel County schools, is making second-dose measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)vaccine available free to middle school students countywide.During October, the county Department of Health will sponsor free MMR immunization clinics in middle and junior high schoolsaround the county. Currently, all students must have had at leastone dose of MMR before entering school.
NEWS
August 4, 1991
A recent outbreak in Maryland, including several cases in Carroll County, has raised concern about meales.Measles is caused by a virus. Common symptoms are high fever, upper respiratory symptoms and a rash.Every child should be vaccinated at 15 months. A second measles shot is recommended at age 12. The shots are usually given as MMR -- measles, mumps and rubella vaccine.More than one-third of cases occur in people 15 years and older. People born after 1957 should receive a booster MMR shot; most of those born before 1957 are considered immune to the virus.
NEWS
By Sara Oppenheim and Sara Oppenheim,Contributing writer | January 16, 1991
Fearing even a small outbreak of highly contagious measles, health officials will offer free combination vaccinations for measles, mumps and rubella to all sixth-grade students in the county.The programwill include all 10 public middle schools as well as private schoolsin the county and will begin Jan. 17.Students must have received at least one MMR shot to enter school. But health officials now recommend that children receive a second immunization, preferably during their sixth-grade year, because the early vaccination is about 95 percent effective, said Ruth Talbot, assistant director of the Howard County Bureau of Personal Health.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | October 10, 2009
Alexandra McKinty will not be putting her 13-month-old in line for the swine flu vaccine. Madelyn, she says, has already had too many shots in her short life. And Loretta Jergensen of Parkville is worried that the vaccine wasn't adequately tested, so her two children also will probably pass. The two mothers illustrate the problem public health officials are having despite an all-out offensive - including an appearance Friday by U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius at a Prince George's County school.
NEWS
By Jia-Rui Chong and Jia-Rui Chong,Los Angeles Times | February 13, 2009
In a major setback for the fight to link autism to vaccines, a special federal court ruled yesterday that the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and vaccines that contained a mercury-based preservative were not connected to autism that developed in three children. The cases of the Cedillo, Hazlehurst and Snyder families could sink the claims of several hundred other families who believe the MMR vaccine alone or in combination with vaccines containing the preservative thimerosal caused their children's autism, said Curtis Webb, a lawyer for the Hazlehurst family.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | January 10, 1991
Spurred by a rash of measles and mumps outbreaks in recent years, county health officials plan to offer free booster vaccinations to all seventh-graders this spring.The Anne Arundel Health Department received 4,746 doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine through a federal contract aimed at stemming a nationwide upsurge in measles cases.Last April, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta reported a two-thirds increase in measles cases across the country. Maryland witnessed a parallel upswing, with 212 measles cases reported in 1990, compared to 113 cases in 1989.
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