Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMixture
IN THE NEWS

Mixture

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2005
Light snow was expected to begin falling by 8 a.m. today around the Baltimore metropolitan area, changing to a mixture of sleet and freezing rain by midmorning and making for hazardous travel conditions throughout the region during the evening commute. The National Weather Service has issued a 24-hour winter weather advisory beginning today at 7 a.m. for the city and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties and an ice storm warning for northern Baltimore, Carroll and Frederick counties.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Law enforcement agencies across Maryland have launched a joint investigation to find the source of a deadly variant of heroin that has claimed dozens of lives in recent months and sent outreach workers scrambling to warn addicts. Authorities say the powerful mixture of heroin and the synthetic opiate fentanyl has also turned up in New England, New York and Pennsylvania. In Maryland, they say, they have been caught off guard by the scale of the problem. For months, health workers, drug users and police have caught glimpses of the cocktail and the damage it has caused.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | August 31, 2003
I am planning to reseed my front lawn in September. Should I use one type of grass seed, or would it be better to use a seed mixture? Some argue that planting one variety of seed produces a more consistent lawn with good even color and uniform growth. While this is true, the uniformity can create some other problems. For example, if the variety you plant is susceptible to a particular disease or insect pest, the entire lawn can be damaged or killed when it is attacked. On the other hand, if you plant a mixture of three or more grasses, a few of them will likely be resistant to the disease or insect and will survive any attack.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun and By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
In a career spanning more than half a century, New York architect Hugh Hardy says he has never worked on an arts-related project like the one his office is designing in Maryland: Harford County's $60 million Center for the Arts. What sets it apart, Hardy said, is the bucolic setting and the mixture of cultural spaces and other facilities that will be under one roof. It's not just an arts center, he says. "It's a community center. It will always have a foundation in the arts. But it's a true community center.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | April 12, 1995
The cheese souffle was created in France in the late 1800s, before people became aware of the health risks of a fat-rich diet.A classic cheese souffle is made with a trio of fattening ingredients -- eggs, butter and cheese -- which make up 68 percent of the calories in the dish. There are few ingredients, other than a splash of milk and a few tablespoons of flour, to cut the proportion of fat. A single serving has more than 18 grams of fat and 246 calories.However, with a little tweaking, even souffle can be made lighter.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 2004
My wife has recently developed diabetes and watches her sugar intake carefully. She uses Equal to sweeten her coffee or iced tea. We read that Equal might be helpful against arthritis pain, but her doctor has never heard of this. He prescribed Vioxx, but it is too expensive. Aspirin and ibuprofen are cheap, but they give her heartburn. Is it true that Equal might work? If so, how much does it take? Research published in Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (May 1998) showed that aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | May 10, 2000
Diane Van Bleikom of Johnstown, Pa., requested a recipe for a Spinning Bowl Salad. "It was a featured item at the Twentieth Century Restaurant in Youngstown, Ohio, which closed about 10 years ago," she wrote. "I'm hoping someone has the recipe, which was fabulous." From Audrey Feldkamp of Marengo, Ill., came the recipe and a touch of its history. Feldkamp wrote, "Actually, this recipe was a longtime trademark of the Blackhawk restaurant in Chicago, and they still make it today at their restaurant in Wheeling, Ill. It has a long speech that goes with it about the number of ingredients ... [and]
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | August 14, 1991
THIS SIMPLE DESSERT, which uses angel food cake mix a its base, has a creamy melon flavor. It's the perfect way to use cantaloupes from the backyard or a farmer's market. The dessert can be prepared up to 24 hours before serving.9- This recipe is from Thomas J. Lipton Inc.Angel Food Torte with Cantaloupe Mousse1 18.25-ounce package angel food cake mix1 envelope unflavored gelatin1/4 cup cold water1 teaspoon fresh lime juice3 cups cantaloupe, about 1 medium, pureed1/4 cup sugar1 teaspoon fresh grated lime peel1/2 teaspoon rum extract, optional1 cup frozen whipped topping, thawedBake angel food cake mix in 10-inch tube pan according to package directions; cool on wire rack.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | March 25, 1991
Teen-agers in Baltimore County are being warned by police and Students Against Drunk Driving about a powerful drug that is a mixture of the volatile hallucinogens LSD and PCP.Police have also asked teen-agers to help them track down the distributor of the lethal mixture.Five students in the county were hospitalized in February and another two in March, according to Michael Gimbel, coordinator of the county Office of Substance Abuse. Two of the students remain hospitalized at the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 2, 2000
Last fall I led a group of good friends on a weeklong wine-and-food tour through Burgundy. During our short stay in this eastern area of France, we visited wineries during the day and dined in restaurants in the evening. It had been a long time since I had traveled in this region, and I had forgotten just how delicious Burgundian food is. Night after night, the chefs amazed my companions and me with their incredible creations. Such dishes as a terrine of foie gras and smoked duck breast served in one restaurant and a savory gateau of guinea fowl and fresh artichokes offered in another were true works of art, but were too complex to reproduce in my home kitchen.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | May 11, 2010
Mr. Ray Nilsson died in an upstairs bedroom in my house early Monday morning around 2:35 a.m., which was nothing he or I contemplated back when I married his daughter, but life takes us down some mighty interesting roads. If he'd had his choice, he probably would've died in the woods around his log cabin in northern Wisconsin, ax in hand, splitting wood — a big whump in the chest and the sky spins and you fall off the planet — or in his library, reading American history and listening to Schubert, or maybe in Sweden, walking around and listening to the beautiful language of his mother and, Whump, get run over by a Volvo.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2009
Colonial Players is a rarity among local nonprofit community theaters: financially secure and supported by a large subscriber base. This all-volunteer company has fewer expenses than other local performing groups and can afford to venture into bold new directions. For its 61st season, Colonial Players mixes classic plays with cutting-edge theater. The first step in embarking on a new season is selecting the plays. Aware that "not all shows will please everybody," CP president Carol Youmans said, "we try to create a slate that is important to actors and directors."
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | March 16, 2009
As spring approaches, I thought we'd do a fun consult with the folks at McCormick & Co. on things you didn't know you could do with food coloring. Here are a few things kids ages 7-12 might enjoy creating. (McCormick, of course, recommends using McCormick Assorted Food Color): * Funny Putty. Start with a cup of white glue in a plastic container. Add 1 cup liquid starch a little at a time, stirring constantly, along with any color of the food coloring, until the mixture is rubbery. Store in an airtight container.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 28, 2008
Thai green curry with chicken offers an appealing mixture of sweet and hot flavors. The curry paste has peppery, often fiery, notes, and a coconut milk sauce adds a gratifying creamy richness. The slices of chicken tossed with few bamboo shoots, some basil, a handful of sliced carrots, and maybe some eggplant and peas, give you a pleasing, potent dish served over rice. Among the thicket of Thai restaurants in Baltimore, I found three winning examples. Thai Restaurant Address --3316 Greenmount Ave. Phone --410-889-6002 Hours --Lunch: 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; Dinner: 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 5 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Sunday An artful, if mild, mixture of chicken and vegetables, including eggplant, for $13.75.
MOBILE
March 19, 2008
Ingredients: CAKE: one 12-ounce can evaporated milk 1 1/4 cups whole milk, plus more if needed 2 boxes Duncan Hines butter-cake mix 2 sticks butter 8 eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla ICING: 2 sticks butter two 12-ounce cans evaporated milk 8 heaping tablespoons unsweetened cocoa 2 pounds confectioners' sugar Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Mix evaporated milk and enough whole milk to make 2 3/4 cups. Place cake mixes, butter, eggs, vanilla and half of the milk mixture in a large mixing bowl.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | February 9, 2008
A bona fide chocoholic, I adore Valentine's Day, when I can indulge in my favorite ingredient without guilt. When February rolls around, I start thinking about what chocolate confection to prepare. This year, I have decided to make one of those luscious dark-chocolate flourless cakes. I recently spotted a recipe in a French cookbook for one that had a slightly different twist. What caught my attention was the fact that the sugar was first caramelized, then diced butter and chopped chocolate were stirred into the hot liquid until they melted.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2002
Marie Disney of Baltimore wrote: "I'm sad that I didn't pay attention when my mother was making her recipe for rice custard pudding. She made it on top of the stove. ... My family wants me to make it but I cannot find a recipe which does not call for baking it. Would someone please help?" Her answer came from Dianne Bucolo of Ellicott City. "I am responding to the request for a rice custard pudding cooked on top of the stove. The recipe that follows is one that I have been making for many years.
FEATURES
January 30, 1991
SOUTHWESTERN COOKING IS one of the "hot" trends in the culinary world.This flamboyant cuisine evolved from influences by native Americans, Spanish and European settlers and also as a result of adapting Mexican cuisine to appeal to American palates and ingredients.This recipe features a sprinkling of Southwestern flavors and ingredients and was developed for unique holiday entertaining. Simply brush a turkey breast with a flavorful mixture of onion recipe soup mix, lime juice, chili powder, garlic, ground cumin and oregano -- then pop it in the microwave or conventional oven whichever you prefer.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | January 30, 2008
What's the difference between butterscotch and caramel? Before I answer, let's pause and say it together: "Mmmmm. Butterscotch." You just don't see enough butterscotch these days. So what's the difference? Technically, caramel is granulated sugar that has been melted and heated until it is brown but not burned, ranging from 320 to 350 degrees. You can add water to make it thinner, and you can add cream or milk to make soft caramel. (Add them carefully, though - hot sugar sputters like sugar lava.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | December 30, 2007
For Cincinnati, 2006 was a very bad year - a record 83 homicides vaulted the Ohio city into eighth place among America's most murderous cities. But instead of despairing, police and residents collaborated on a campaign to stem the rising violence with a combination of basic police work and innovative efforts to promote civil behavior. By this weekend, Cincinnati (population 330,000) was finishing 2007 with just 63 slayings so far.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.