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By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2004
A Virginia-based developer of planned residential communities and mixed-use projects will build the hundreds of upscale condominiums proposed for Canton Crossing, a $500 million project under development by Baltimore banker Edwin F. Hale Sr. in the heart of Canton's industrial waterfront. Hale, whose company, Hale Properties, is building the residential, retail and office community at Boston and Clinton streets, sought late last month to vastly expand the housing component, boosting the number of proposed condos from 100 to 504. Hale said yesterday that he chose KSI Services Inc., based in Vienna, Va., to develop the housing portion of the project because of the company's work in developing residential and commercial mixed-use developments and, just as importantly, its expertise in urban revitalization.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
A Baltimore County developer has assembled three blocks of industrial buildings, empty lots and homes in the Sharp-Leadenhall neighborhood, with plans to build a $250 million project with apartments, offices and stores between Federal Hill and M&T Bank Stadium. The proposed Stadium Square project aims to revitalize three key blocks just west of Cross Street Market and advance the economic investment occurring elsewhere on the South Baltimore peninsula, said the developer, Caves Valley Partners.
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NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1997
The Howard County Council voted last night to require that developers of Columbia-style mixed-use projects build as much as 10 percent of their units as affordable housing.Since last fall, when the Rouse Co. proposed building a 525-acre mixed-use project off Interstate 95 in North Laurel, the County Council has considered adding new requirements to the zoning category.The half-dozen mixed-use zones are some of Howard's last, big developable parcels. The zoning rules are supposed to encourage a mix of business, residential and open-space areas in the style of Columbia.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | December 12, 2013
A community group in the Loch Raven area got a first look Monday night at plans for Loch Raven Commons, a $45 million mixed-use development with up to 200 high-end apartments, commercial space and a village green proposed for the former Raytheon site on East Joppa Road. The meeting, which was held in Councilman David Marks' office, included the project's developer, the Buccini/Pollin Group, and an advisory committee comprising residents of nearby Towson Estates and Loch Raven Village that Marks formed earlier this year.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1997
The push to require studies of the fiscal impact of Columbia-style mixed-use projects came to a halt last night as the Howard County Council failed to override the veto of County Executive Charles I. Ecker.Though a majority of the five-member council still supported the bill, its three votes were one short of the four needed to override a veto.Councilman C. Vernon Gray, an east Columbia Democrat, spent months pushing the bill.He said it would give the Zoning Board -- composed of the five members of the County Council -- crucial information as it decides on the proper mix of homes and businesses in such developments.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1997
The Howard County Planning Board last night unanimously rejected a proposal that would have required developers to show how mixed-use projects would fiscally affect the county.The board also unanimously approved expansion of The Mall in Columbia, extension of Broken Land Parkway onto mall property and a site plan for a Silver Diner in Town Center.Councilman C. Vernon Gray, an East Columbia Democrat, said his fiscal-impact proposal would have helped county officials to know if proposed mixed-use projects would generate enough tax revenue to pay for the services they use.Mixed-use districts require a minimum of 15 percent business property and a minimum of 25 percent open space.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1996
Developers of Howard County's mixed-use projects -- modeled after Columbia's villages -- will have to study their impact on the county's finances before construction if Councilman C. Vernon Gray gets his way.Gray, an east Columbia Democrat, said the fiscal impact studies would help county officials judge whether the developments, including the Rouse Co.'s 525-acre project proposed for North Laurel, would help or hurt the county's bottom line."
NEWS
January 4, 2004
ONE OF THE nation's largest transit-oriented developments is taking shape along Baltimore's Howard Street, at the confluence of this region's transit lines. And at the Owings Mills Metro stop, the state plans to invest $14 million in a parking garage as part of a 46-acre mixed-use, transit-oriented project. So it's somewhat surprising that the state Department of Transportation only now is aggressively seeking bids from developers interested in building on state land at 10 MARC, bus and subway stops.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
It would be easier to redevelop large, historic manufacturing sites in Baltimore County under legislation approved Monday by the County Council. Under the bill, tracts of land 40 acres or larger that are zoned for heavy manufacturing and include buildings on the Maryland Historical Trust's historic properties list could be used for retail, office and residential development. Developers would not have to wait for the county rezoning process — which happens every four years — to turn such properties into mixed-use projects.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
As anyone knows, it's not easy buying moderately priced homes in Howard County these days. As county officials are finding out, it's almost as hard building them. County officials have spent the past few months trying to devise regulations for the moderate-income housing units to be included in the three large mixed-use projects slated for southern Howard. It's not an easy task. The units need to be large enough that they blend in with the rest of the development, yet modest enough that they remain affordable to middle-income buyers.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
A new tower, possibly of apartments, could rise on the East Pratt Street parking lot across from Harborplace in the next four to six years, filling one of the most prominent vacant lots in downtown Baltimore. A Chicago-based parking garage operator and developer bought the nearly 1-acre former site of the News American newspaper for an undisclosed sum, Cushman & Wakefield of Maryland Inc., the brokerage firm representing the seller, has announced. InterPark Holdings, a private investor in parking facilities across the United States, purchased the land at 300 E. Pratt St. from UrbanAmerica Advisors LLC, which has owned it for seven years.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
It would be easier to redevelop large, historic manufacturing sites in Baltimore County under legislation approved Monday by the County Council. Under the bill, tracts of land 40 acres or larger that are zoned for heavy manufacturing and include buildings on the Maryland Historical Trust's historic properties list could be used for retail, office and residential development. Developers would not have to wait for the county rezoning process — which happens every four years — to turn such properties into mixed-use projects.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2011
State officials are seeking a developer to build a mixed-use project on 12 waterfront acres in Cambridge on the Eastern Shore. The state's Department of Transportation, which owns the site off Route 50 on the shores of the Choptank River, issued a request for qualifications Wednesday, state Transportation Secretary Beverley K. Swaim-Staley said in a statement Wednesday. The Cambridge Marine Terminal/Sailwinds site, owned by the Maryland Port Administration and leased to the city of Cambridge, sits downriver from the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Resort.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Lorraine Mirabella | November 16, 2009
A developer is planning Howard County's third urban-style mixed-use development along the MARC rail commuter line near Elkridge, a site long expected to be used for a Coca-Cola bottling plant. The 122-acre project, called Oxford Square, would include up to 1,400 apartments and condominiums, 1 million square feet of commercial space, retail stores, a hotel and possibly six acres for a school, mimicking similar proposals at the Savage and Laurel Park train stations farther south. The transit station projects have all been promoted as examples of Smart Growth - absorbing new residences and commercial development in areas already served by mass transit, roads, utilities and schools.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2008
Baltimore officials are paving the way for an extensive mixed-use project along the eastern shore of the Middle Branch with a plan to acquire the mostly industrial property and offer it for private development. A proposed urban renewal plan for West Covington, bounded by Interstate 95 on the north, Hanover Street on the east and the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River on the west, would enable the city to acquire about 50 acres in a part of the city targeted for redevelopment. But industrial businesses that would be displaced are fighting the plan, saying they already provide the jobs and economic development urban renewal is designed to bring.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2007
Plans to replace a luxury condo project planned for the city's Charles Village neighborhood with a taller building containing smaller rental units, double the retail space and offices won approval from the city's design panel yesterday despite objections from neighboring Johns Hopkins University to the added height. The Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel signed off on developer Struever Bros. Eccles and Rouse's request to build a 13-story building, an addition of 24 feet that still requires City Council approval.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
As anyone knows, it's not easy buying moderately priced homes in Howard County these days. As county officials are finding out, it's almost as hard building them. County officials have spent the past few months trying to devise regulations for the moderate-income housing units to be included in the three large mixed-use projects slated for southern Howard. It's not an easy task. The units need to be large enough to blend in with the rest of the development, yet modest enough to be affordable to middle-income buyers.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
Slogging toward a way to make large village-style developments more acceptable to residents, the Howard County Council has made a decision: one more meeting.A work session discussion yesterday produced no agreement on what council members agree is the crucial element of Councilman Guy J. Guzzone's bill to tighten regulations on mixed-use developments (MXD) -- roads.Guzzone, a Laurel-Savage Democrat, presented his colleagues with seven options -- ranging from requiring that roads be open before each phase of development starts to grandfathering approvals for two proposed developments in Laurel and Fulton.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | January 2, 2007
A development plan that includes a tower to rival the city's tallest skyscrapers could mean the demolition of yet another vestige of downtown's historic architecture. Setting up what would be downtown Baltimore's third preservation face-off in less than a year, a Washington-area development team is in early talks with the city about building a mixed-use project near the end of the Jones Falls Expressway, including a tower that could rise as high as 60 stories. To make that happen, the developers would need to raze the Terminal Warehouse, an unimposing brick edifice that has stood on the Guilford Avenue site since 1894 - and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1975.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
Towson Commons, the retail and office complex in the heart of Towson that has struggled as a shopping mall, will get a $30 million makeover and new stores next year under a new owner, a Washington-based developer of mixed-use projects. Western Development Corp. closed on a deal for an undisclosed amount Friday to purchase the 324,440-square-foot center at York Road and West Pennsylvania Avenue. Redevelopment could include a reconfiguration of the retail and office space and the addition of condominiums, Bradford Dockser, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Western Development, said yesterday.
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