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October 27, 1991
From: Henry SenatoreEllicott CityOn the evening of Oct. 22, I attended a community meeting at the Waverly Elementary School to hear County Executive Charles I. Ecker speak about the mixed-use center planned for the Waverly Woods site. This topic also let him discuss growth as it relates to the General Plan and adequate facilities legislation. The president of the community association CARE and activist Susan Gray also addressed the gathering.The impression that I had leaving the meeting was that CARE isnot a wild "no-growth" organization.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | October 9, 2014
The city's design panel on Thursday approved a master plan for a large mixed use development in East Baltimore opposite the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The proposal by developer MCB Real Estate LLC calls for two buildings along Eastern Avenue: a six-story apartment building, with ground floor retail and an interior courtyard, and a smaller, one-story shoppping structure, with a large 250-spot parking lot farther east. If market demand is strong, MCB could create a taller mixed-use site in place of the smaller building.
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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | July 8, 1993
Backing away from earlier statements favoring low housing density in a new mixed-use zoning category, county Zoning Board members voted narrowly to allow large sites to be developed more densely than Columbia.If the vote at last night's work session becomes official -- part of a package of zoning regulations signed by a majority of the members -- a mixed-use center of more than 75 acres could have an average of three housing units per acre.The developed sections of Columbia average nearly 2.4 dwelling units per acre.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Jill and Allan Bennett have filled a 22,000-square foot building with a dark and creepy mix of bloody monsters and pitch-black mazes. But soon their popular haunted house, Bennett's Curse, will be homeless, as the property they lease in Jessup is slated for development. The grassy field where their white building holds giant vampire bats, menacing monsters and creepy grim reapers will eventually become part of a mixed-use development of townhouses, shops and offices. So even as they open this weekend for their fall season, the Bennetts are scouting for a new location to set up their fright show for next year.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | November 20, 1992
County voters ought to be able to approve or reject the proposed comprehensive rezoning of the eastern county, a North Laurel resident told the Planning Board last night."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | July 29, 1993
The county Zoning Board approved the most bitterly opposed component of the county's comprehensive rezoning plan late last night.Sitting as the board, all five County Council members voted to change 820 acres zoned for three-acre homesites in Fulton to mixed-use. A new zoning type, mixed-use would allow a strictly regulated combination of houses, apartments, shops and businesses.The board adopted three other mixed-use sites, but put off until September deliberations on the largest site -- 1,085 acres straddling Interstate 95 in North Laurel -- and a 42-acre site southeast of the intersection of Route 216 and U.S. 29.Last night's work session decisions will not be final until the board signs the package of zoning changes.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
A proposal for Howard County's first "mixed-use" community -- where residents could walk to work and stores -- stumbled last week when the Howard County Planning Board ruled against a North Laurel developer.But an attorney for developer Willard H. Marlow plans to take his case to the Howard County Zoning Board, probably by March.Mr. Marlow wants to develop 32 acres just northwest of the U.S. 29-Route 216 interchange. The land is next to nearly 800 acres, owned by others, that also have been classified mixed use.In all, the county has five areas designated for mixed-use developments, none of which has been developed.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | January 7, 1993
Members of the County Council shared their opinions on mixed-use development with members of the public who turned out last night for a hearing on the comprehensive rezoning of eastern Howard.The council members -- sitting as the Zoning Board -- normally question speakers about their testimony at such hearings, but last night's session at the George Howard county office building in Ellicott City became more of a "dialogue," as board Chairman C. Vernon Gray put it, between the officeholders and about 150 people in the audience.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1995
The Howard County Zoning Board stood by county planners' vision of a careful mix of houses, apartments, shops and businesses on 820 acres in Fulton, refusing last night to allow a property owner to cut his land out of the mixed-use area.While that decision followed the recommendations of the county Department of Planning and Zoning and the Planning Board, the board went against similar recommendations in another case. It granted rezoning in western Ellicott City allowing a two-story building with apartments above shops and offices.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
Zoning Board Chairman C. Vernon Gray directed the Planning Department last week to assess the design of Waverly Woods II from a mixed-use perspective.Susan Gray, an attorney opposed to the proposed residential, commercial and golfing village east of the county landfill between Route 99 and Interstate 70, objected."I don't know if it's relevant," she said following Wednesday night's Zoning Board hearing.Ronald L. Spahn, attorney for developer Donald R. Reuwer Jr., did not object to the Zoning Board chairman's request, but said he would like to think about it between now and Sept.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
A Baltimore County developer has assembled three blocks of industrial buildings, empty lots and homes in the Sharp-Leadenhall neighborhood, with plans to build a $250 million project with apartments, offices and stores between Federal Hill and M&T Bank Stadium. The proposed Stadium Square project aims to revitalize three key blocks just west of Cross Street Market and advance the economic investment occurring elsewhere on the South Baltimore peninsula, said the developer, Caves Valley Partners.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
The buyer of the Eastpoint Mall has deepened its investment in southeast Baltimore, purchasing a 20-acre parcel with a goal of mixed-use development. MCB Real Estate, LLC paid $3 million for the 5601 Eastern Ave. property last month, according to land records. The company is meeting with community groups and nearby institutions to develop ideas for the site, said MCB managing partner P. David Bramble. It intends a mixed-use project, which will require a zoning change from the current industrial designation, he said.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | December 12, 2013
A community group in the Loch Raven area got a first look Monday night at plans for Loch Raven Commons, a $45 million mixed-use development with up to 200 high-end apartments, commercial space and a village green proposed for the former Raytheon site on East Joppa Road. The meeting, which was held in Councilman David Marks' office, included the project's developer, the Buccini/Pollin Group, and an advisory committee comprising residents of nearby Towson Estates and Loch Raven Village that Marks formed earlier this year.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
A new tower, possibly of apartments, could rise on the East Pratt Street parking lot across from Harborplace in the next four to six years, filling one of the most prominent vacant lots in downtown Baltimore. A Chicago-based parking garage operator and developer bought the nearly 1-acre former site of the News American newspaper for an undisclosed sum, Cushman & Wakefield of Maryland Inc., the brokerage firm representing the seller, has announced. InterPark Holdings, a private investor in parking facilities across the United States, purchased the land at 300 E. Pratt St. from UrbanAmerica Advisors LLC, which has owned it for seven years.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | August 22, 2013
Developers from Klingbeil Capital Management broke ground Thursday on a new mixed-use development that will bring 142 flat-style apartments into the city's designated arts district on C Street.  The apartments, which are expected to undergo full construction next month and be completed by September 2014, will be built at 350 Municipal Square; the former site of City Hall and the Laurel Police department.  "The vision for this property is to bring life and activity to Main Street," said Jim Callard, president of Klingbeil Capital Management.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Eastern Baltimore County residents say a bill before the County Council could open the door to poorly planned development on a key tract in the Middle River area near Route 43. "Let's work on a better bill, please," said Allen Robertson, president of the Bowleys Quarters Community Association, during a council work session Tuesday. Robertson said his group wants the council to withdraw or table the legislation. The measure, proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's administration, would allow residential development on part of an 800-acre tract near White Marsh Boulevard that is now zoned for industrial use. County leaders once hoped the site would attract major employers.
NEWS
June 12, 2000
The Annapolis Board of Appeals is scheduled to begin a round of public hearings this evening on a plan to build a mixed-use community near Westgate Circle. Hearings are scheduled for 7:30 tonight, Wednesday and June 21 at City Hall. An additional hearing would take place July 13 if needed. The project, to be called Park Place, would include a 225-room hotel, two office buildings, a 950-seat auditorium, 208 condominiums and a 1,400-space parking garage spread over 7 acres at West Street and Taylor Avenue.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | January 21, 1993
Howard County Councilman Charles C. Feaga backed away slightly this week from his proposal to eliminate a mixed-use site in Fulton from the 1990 General Plan.Mr. Feaga would designate all but a small portion of the 820-acre farm for single-family homes. The remainder would be for commercial and business use."I'm not real crazy about what I've introduced here," Mr. Feaga, R-5th, told a crowd of about 110 people at a public hearing on his proposal Tuesday night. "I did this as a compromise."
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
The redevelopment of an 11-acre tract in Baltimore's Remington neighborhood can move ahead now that the state's highest court has ruled on a zoning appeal that held up the plan for years. "The project would have been done, generating benefits for the community and taxes for the city if these petitions had not been filed," said Jon Laria, the attorney for the developer of the mixed-used project, called 25th Street Station. On Tuesday, the Maryland Court of Appeals released its unanimous opinion that two people who live near the development site, one in Remington and the other in Charles Village, are not eligible to appeal the Baltimore City Council's decision to grant the zoning approval for the project.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
After the Mount Vernon United Methodist Church was ravaged by a lightning-strike fire four years ago, the Hampden neighborhood was left with what appeared to be an unusable building. But Mark Dent saw more than a burned-out shell of an old stone church. He saw the future home of Chesapeake Systems, the 25-person computer company he co-owns. Still, the rebirth of the burned out church as a commercial building almost didn't happen. Dent's company spent months — and thousands of dollars — trying to work through the city's antiquated zoning law. As the process dragged on, he thought seriously about moving out of Baltimore, to an office park off Interstate 95. The city hopes to avoid such near-misses with a far-reaching piece of legislation, "Transform Baltimore," that would replace the city's decades-old zoning law. The new law is designed to be more understandable, speed up the zoning process, and discourage ad hoc zoning layers that are being used to sidestep outmoded rules.
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