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Mixed Signals

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By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
SALT LAKE CITY - This was going to be about fun and games. That's what drives the Outdoor Retailer trade show, the twice-annual event that fills the city's Salt Palace with the gear and goodies that you, dear consumer, will be lusting after next year. But despite a record number of people at the show, there's a sense of the same old, same old. Maybe we're on another technological plateau, where the only changes to the average consumer's eye are in the colors and dazzling variety options offered on a given product.
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NEWS
October 25, 2013
Contrary to your editorial, the present leaders of Iran, with their more moderate talk, are not sending "mixed signals" but merely confirming their long-term agenda while simultaneously lobbying for the lifting of sanctions ("Iran's mixed signals," Oct. 21). Iran has not deviated one iota from its nuclear and missile program during the current negotiations, now temporarily postponed. Iran's objective has been clear from the start of the purported warm-up - namely, to reduce pressure on its economy and continue its nuclear program without interference now that Israel is unable to respond while negotiations continue.
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NEWS
January 19, 1993
Will the real Howard County school system please stand up?Is it the shallow-eyed waif asking for another bowl of gruel, or the rich kid with the bowtie and the perfect part in his hair? Who could tell from the mixed signals emanating from the county school system.Last fall, the school administration reported that the county will have to go to double shifts or a year-round school calendar to accommodate all the youngsters attending public school in the county. This month, Superintendent Michael E. Hickey reports that "the county revenue picture is looking very good," and the county can afford an 8 percent increase in its budget for next year without a tax increase.
NEWS
August 31, 2011
If Hurricane Irene has accomplished anything - aside from causing Gov. Martin O'Malley to spend what seems like his every waking hour touring flood damage and power outages for the TV cameras - it's to demonstrate that a great many Maryland drivers don't know what to do when a traffic signal is out of operation. Perhaps you have had the frustrating experience of getting stuck at a blacked-out intersection where drivers don't seem to understand who should cross the road next.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush and his top economic advisers, undecided about what to propose to revive the flagging economy, sent mixed signals yesterday on cutting taxes and on whether to violate last year's budget agreement.The confusion was clearest on Capitol Hill. On the first day of a series of congressional hearings on tax policy and the state of the economy, the economic advisers at first suggested that giving the economy a quick jolt was more important than holding to the budget agreement.
NEWS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | April 25, 2006
When oil topped $35 a barrel for the first time just before the Iraq war, economists were sure the nation was in for soaring gas prices and a likely economic downturn. Now that oil costs more than twice that much, economists are just as nervous, and twice as confused. Instead of a recession, last fall's record rise in gas prices was followed by a quarter of spectacular U.S. economic growth, moderate inflation and unexpectedly strong job gains. That raises the question: Can the U.S. economy sustain $3-per-gallon gas indefinitely?
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - In the belly of the Capitol on Saturday afternoon, House Speaker Dennis Hastert gathered his Republicans troops to ask if they could live with a painstakingly negotiated measure to reform the nation's intelligence system in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. They couldn't. Despite repeated calls from President Bush to cut a deal, a marathon week of negotiating that produced a widely supported product, and intense pressure from families of Sept. 11 victims to address intelligence weaknesses, the staunch opposition of a few influential Republicans doomed the bill.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson Jr. endorsed yesterday the request by World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz for more time to defend himself against charges of misconduct, seeking a delay that could also give the Bush administration time to negotiate his voluntary resignation. Two days after a special bank committee found Wolfowitz guilty of violating conflict-of-interest rules in 2005, the Bush administration sent mixed signals on how strongly it was supporting him against growing demands among U.S. allies in Europe that he resign.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
Consumers' minds these days are about as jumbled as the racks at Filene's Basement at closing time. Consumer confidence took a sharp downward turn in August, according to a report by the Conference Board, a private research group. But just a day earlier, the Commerce Department reported spending was up slightly despite tepid job growth. The 32,000 jobs that employers added to payrolls in July was the smallest gain this year, and a sign to some that the economic engine had once again stalled.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
Though it went unsaid by the Orioles' front office, this season was never about wins and losses, or where the team finished in the American League East standings. Year One of club president Andy MacPhail's major rebuilding project was always going to be measured by individual progress and organizational development. When the Orioles' 11th consecutive losing season came to a merciful end yesterday and another pivotal offseason began, team officials were left to sort through mixed signals.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
SALT LAKE CITY - This was going to be about fun and games. That's what drives the Outdoor Retailer trade show, the twice-annual event that fills the city's Salt Palace with the gear and goodies that you, dear consumer, will be lusting after next year. But despite a record number of people at the show, there's a sense of the same old, same old. Maybe we're on another technological plateau, where the only changes to the average consumer's eye are in the colors and dazzling variety options offered on a given product.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | June 15, 2011
If you live in Maryland and order a box of $5 stogies over the Internet this summer, you might get busted for accepting an illegal tobacco shipment. Or you might not. Comptroller Peter Franchot says he doesn't want to enforce a prohibition on Internet sales of premium cigars that took effect May 1. The ban was "an unintended consequence" of 2010 reform of wholesale tobacco commerce, he said in a letter to legislative leaders dated Monday. He asked their permission to suspend enforcement of the law until the fall, when the General Assembly meets again.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
In the three recession years ending in mid-2010, Howard County netted just 83 new jobs, according to state labor figures, but local officials are proud to have seen any growth at all — especially compared with big losses in surrounding counties. Over that same period, Frederick County lost a net 2,257 jobs, Anne Arundel lost 4,401, Baltimore County lost 10,394, and Montgomery County lost 14,034. Across all of Maryland, the net job loss was 65,089. "We were the only county in the area to gain jobs," county finance director Sharon Greisz told a combined meeting of the county's Economic Outlook and the Spending Affordability committees Wednesday morning at the George Howard building in Ellicott City.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
Though it went unsaid by the Orioles' front office, this season was never about wins and losses, or where the team finished in the American League East standings. Year One of club president Andy MacPhail's major rebuilding project was always going to be measured by individual progress and organizational development. When the Orioles' 11th consecutive losing season came to a merciful end yesterday and another pivotal offseason began, team officials were left to sort through mixed signals.
NEWS
By Michael Cross-Barnet | July 26, 2008
Everything gives you cancer. There's no cure, there's no answer. Everything gives you cancer. Don't touch that dial; don't try to smile ... Joe Jackson, "Cancer" Maybe Mr. Jackson was on to something. Though his 1982 pop lament focused on the potential perils of meat, alcohol and tobacco, the words seem newly prescient after a warning that using a cellular phone may increase the risk of brain cancer. Are there any two scarier words in English? But wait - before ditching that new iPhone in the Dumpster, it should be noted that the usefulness of this week's warning by 23 prominent doctors and researchers is questionable.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson Jr. endorsed yesterday the request by World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz for more time to defend himself against charges of misconduct, seeking a delay that could also give the Bush administration time to negotiate his voluntary resignation. Two days after a special bank committee found Wolfowitz guilty of violating conflict-of-interest rules in 2005, the Bush administration sent mixed signals on how strongly it was supporting him against growing demands among U.S. allies in Europe that he resign.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
Contrary to your editorial, the present leaders of Iran, with their more moderate talk, are not sending "mixed signals" but merely confirming their long-term agenda while simultaneously lobbying for the lifting of sanctions ("Iran's mixed signals," Oct. 21). Iran has not deviated one iota from its nuclear and missile program during the current negotiations, now temporarily postponed. Iran's objective has been clear from the start of the purported warm-up - namely, to reduce pressure on its economy and continue its nuclear program without interference now that Israel is unable to respond while negotiations continue.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 22, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- After a year of last-place ratings, NBC says it's through chasing young viewers."We have a new direction," NBC Entertainment President Warren Littlefield said, "broad-based family entertainment."Broad-based family entertainment is not exactly a new concept. In fact, it's the business all the networks -- except Fox -- had always been in before NBC went all out for the youth market last year.Littlefield, himself on shaky ground at the network, didn't have a lot of exciting new projects to announce as part of NBC's family entertainment agenda.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | April 8, 2007
It was a quarter of contrasts that left mutual fund investors feeling whipsawed. In February, former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan suggested a recession might be near. Then current Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke countered with a prediction of continued growth despite growing "uncertainties." The housing market sank, but nonresidential construction stayed strong. The subprime lending market continued to implode, but some other financial services did well. Oil prices spiked and inflation fears grew, but consumers kept buying flat-screen televisions and other consumer goods.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Brent Jones and Sara Neufeld and Brent Jones,Sun reporters | February 8, 2007
Baltimore school administrators contradicted last night earlier assertions by the school board chairman that elementary schools expanding to serve sixth- through eighth-grades don't have enough staff. Interim Chief Executive Officer Charlene Cooper Boston and Chief Academic Officer Linda Chinnia defended the centerpiece of a major school consolidation plan, telling City Council members that extended elementaries have a better teacher-student ratio than traditional middle schools. Their comments, at a hearing of the council's education committee, differed with an earlier statement by school board Chairman Brian D. Morris.
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