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By Cox News Service | May 7, 1994
FOLKESTONE, England -- Queen Elizabeth II and President Francois Mitterrand of France crossed the English Channel by luxury train yesterday, capping a centuries-old Anglo-French dream to join Britain with Europe."
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 1996
PARIS -- The puppet representing President Jacques Chirac these days on "Les Guignols," the hugely popular satirical TV show, bears a striking resemblance to an energetic retiree on a cruise ship. Sporting a deep tan, he has the casual manner of a fellow with plenty of time on his hands.Truth be told, Chirac doesn't have much of a tan. But he sure does like to travel. One year into his seven-year term, the French president has logged 15 official journeys in France and 28 around the globe, from Mallorca to Bangkok and Washington to Moscow.
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NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | September 15, 1990
*TC PARIS -- French President Francois Mitterrand called the Iraqi storming of the French ambassador's residence in Kuwait City yesterday a violation of international law and an "aggression" and vowed that France "will respond to it."Speaking during a trip to Czechoslovakia, where he met wit President Vaclav Havel, Mr. Mitterrand said he would convene an emergency session of his Cabinet this morning to formulate the French response.Iraqi soldiers entered the French ambassador's residenc yesterday morning, seizing the French military attache, Col. Edouard Crespin, and three French nationals who had been hiding in the embassy to avoid being taken hostage.
NEWS
January 12, 1996
THREE PERSONALITIES dominated French national life in this century: Georges Clemenceau, "the Tiger" who was premier in World War I; Charles de Gaulle, the general who raised France from defeat to victory in World War II and later had a constitution tailored to his presidential dimensions; and Francois Mitterrand, the austere and haughty president who helped design everything from an opera house to the unity of Europe in a 14-year presidency ending last...
NEWS
April 4, 1992
When President Bush's popularity sagged, White House chief of staff John Sununu had to go. That failed to distract anyone who disliked the president. What bothered them was the recession, not Mr. Sununu's brusque manner. Still, almost any president would have done the same thing. In fact, the president of France, Francois Mitterrand, just did.Since the local elections last month repudiated the ruling Socialists, allowing them a scant 18.3 percent of the vote, all France was waiting for him to replace Prime Minister Edith Cresson.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | March 5, 1991
PARIS -- Less than a week after Paris and Washington seemed to speak from one script in confronting Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, French leaders are moving quickly to rebuild their position in the Middle East by staking France's diplomatic turf far from Washington in the aftermath of the war.French President Francois Mitterrand has suggested a summit meeting of United Nations Security Council members to organize the peace in the Persian Gulf and lay...
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | December 18, 1990
PARIS -- The United States' European allies in the Persian Gulf standoff, while formally supporting the United Nations demand that Iraq withdraw from Kuwait, have quietly agreed that another U.N. demand -- requiring Iraq to restore the pre-invasion government in Kuwait -- would not alone be worth fighting for.At a meeting of European Community leaders in Rome last weekend and at a NATO foreign ministers meeting in Brussels, Belgium, yesterday, both bodies...
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | March 19, 1992
Paris. -- Francois Mitterrand, France's president, has been called ''the Florentine'' because of the subtlety of his political perceptions and the deviousness of his maneuvers; and one must add, for his ruthlessness, which now appears to extend to a willingness to weaken the Fifth Republic itself for the sake of personal ambition.His is a contradictory record with respect to the Fifth Republic's constitution, written and adopted under General de Gaulle. He first called it a mere subterfuge by which de Gaulle was discarding ''the last obstacles to his march towards absolutism.
NEWS
March 28, 1993
The rejection of the left in France's parliamentary voting, to be concluded today, is decisive. It will leave the aloof Socialist president, Francois Mitterrand, isolated in the last two years of his seven-year term. It is a foregone conclusion he will appoint Edouard Balladur, the chief lieutenant of Gaullist Jacques Chirac, as prime minister. The shouting is about whether Mr. Mitterrand should resign the presidency, which he insists he will not.The constitution of the Fifth Republic of 1958 is boomeranging.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | September 15, 1994
Paris -- In the end, it is a question of character. During nearly a half-century Francois Mitterrand built a political career founded on ambition and dominated by his sense of rivalry with Charles De Gaulle.He is nearing the end of his second seven-year term as president of the Fifth French Republic, which De Gaulle founded. De Gaulle failed to complete a full term, resigning in 1969 as old age closed on him, and in the aftermath of the popular upheaval of May 1968.Mr. Mitterrand now is old too, and very ill from prostate cancer.
NEWS
By Stan Andersen | May 1, 1995
San Francisco -- U.S. PRESIDENTS leave hometown archival libraries to remember them by. But not the presidents of France -- no way! They leave big museums.The one departing the office this spring after a new French election, Francois Mitterrand, will leave the biggest museum of them all -- Le Grand Louvre. In his two terms, he got this icon of French culture converted into the world's most extensive and user-friendly art museum.Being that rare bird, a Socialist who won re-election, he's leaving not only the remade Louvre but seven other great works.
NEWS
September 28, 1994
Francois Mitterrand, eight months from honored retirement as president of France, the nation's foremost Man of the Left, Europe's leading surviving Socialist, ill from prostate cancer at 77, perhaps unable to complete his term, has done his nation one final service.He has collaborated on the public revelation of his own squalid past. In so doing, he may -- may -- have helped France to confront its own collaboration with Nazi Germany in the 1940s.The facts brought out with Mr. Mitterrand's help by Pierre Pean in his book, "A French Youth: Francois Mitterrand 1934-47," are clear enough.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | September 15, 1994
Paris -- In the end, it is a question of character. During nearly a half-century Francois Mitterrand built a political career founded on ambition and dominated by his sense of rivalry with Charles De Gaulle.He is nearing the end of his second seven-year term as president of the Fifth French Republic, which De Gaulle founded. De Gaulle failed to complete a full term, resigning in 1969 as old age closed on him, and in the aftermath of the popular upheaval of May 1968.Mr. Mitterrand now is old too, and very ill from prostate cancer.
NEWS
By Bernard D. Kaplan and Bernard D. Kaplan,Hearst News Service | September 8, 1994
PARIS -- All of France is intrigued by why President Francois Mitterrand cooperated in the writing of a new book that describes how he faithfully served the wartime Vichy government and remained friendly afterward with some of that pro-Nazi regime's most unsavory characters.The book, "A French Youth," lifts the veil on Mr. Mitterrand's World War II years. It details his role as a Vichy official so devoted to its chief, Marshal Philippe Petain, that he was awarded a high decoration attesting to his loyalty.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The annual economic summit of the Group of Seven usually has little political meaning because so little takes place that might have any direct effect on anyone's life.The president, whoever it happens to be, puts on a blue suit and a red tie and goes somewhere to meet similarly attired leaders of other major industrial nations for a few days. They discuss common issues, issue fiendishly opaque communiques and then home and, as you might expect, do whatever is in their own national interests.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | May 7, 1994
FOLKESTONE, England -- Queen Elizabeth II and President Francois Mitterrand of France crossed the English Channel by luxury train yesterday, capping a centuries-old Anglo-French dream to join Britain with Europe."
NEWS
By Stan Andersen | May 1, 1995
San Francisco -- U.S. PRESIDENTS leave hometown archival libraries to remember them by. But not the presidents of France -- no way! They leave big museums.The one departing the office this spring after a new French election, Francois Mitterrand, will leave the biggest museum of them all -- Le Grand Louvre. In his two terms, he got this icon of French culture converted into the world's most extensive and user-friendly art museum.Being that rare bird, a Socialist who won re-election, he's leaving not only the remade Louvre but seven other great works.
NEWS
March 28, 1993
The rejection of the left in France's parliamentary voting, to be concluded today, is decisive. It will leave the aloof Socialist president, Francois Mitterrand, isolated in the last two years of his seven-year term. It is a foregone conclusion he will appoint Edouard Balladur, the chief lieutenant of Gaullist Jacques Chirac, as prime minister. The shouting is about whether Mr. Mitterrand should resign the presidency, which he insists he will not.The constitution of the Fifth Republic of 1958 is boomeranging.
NEWS
By EDUARDO CUE | March 21, 1993
Paris. -- Taking their cue from the standoff in Waco, the creators of French television's popular "Bebete Show" recently depicted President Francois Mitterrand, rifle in hand, entrenched the presidential Elysee Palace. The president, portrayed as a frog wearing a helmet, would go into a rage and fire away at his political opponents who had gathered outside to urge him to surrender.The sketch captured the essence of the campaign leading to today's vote in the first round of parliamentary elections certain to result in a landslide victory for a conservative coalition against the ruling Socialists.
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