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By NEWSDAY | October 13, 1996
Parkinson's disease may be caused by a genetic defect in the body's energy-producing cellular sructures, a finding that could lead to treatments to stall or prevent the debilitating disorder, according to a new study.Researchers at the University of Virginia are defying conventional genetic wisdom, suggesting that a mutation in mitochondrial DNA, rather than in the DNA that makes up chromosomes, can lead to common medical disorders such as Parkinson's.The disease leaves people with tremors and rigidity.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
Before men began to hunt whales for profit, the ocean's whale population was six to eight times higher than scientists previously believed, according to a new and politically sensitive study. Although a 1986 ban on commercial whaling has increased their numbers, the ban should remain in effect because there are still far fewer whales than when Herman Melville wrote Moby Dick in 1851. "What we're saying is, the whales still have got a long way to go," said Joe Roman, a conservation biologist at Harvard and the study's lead author.
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NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | February 1, 1994
Scientists seeking to learn when humans first began to populate the Americas have created an evolutionary "clock" that suggests the event must have occurred in the depths of an ice age nearly 30,000 years ago.If their claim is correct, it will more than double the antiquity of the "first Americans." Most archaeologists have long contended that the ancestors of today's multitude of Indian tribes could not have arrived in the Western Hemisphere any earlier than 12,000 to 15,000 years ago.In any event, the Indian tribes of the Americas, the true "Native Americans," do indeed go far back in time.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Michael Dresser and Jonathan Bor and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center have developed a new way of detecting cancers that requires patients to provide only a urine, saliva or sputum sample. Dr. David Sidransky said the test would allow doctors to find early cancers that are hard to detect with conventional methods such as biopsies. Labs would screen body fluids for genetic changes that are associated with cancer. The tests would be commercially available within the next five years, he said. "We now have an entirely new method of cancer detection that can be used when cancers are still amenable to early detection and cure," said Sidransky, a specialist in head and neck cancers.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
Before men began to hunt whales for profit, the ocean's whale population was six to eight times higher than scientists previously believed, according to a new and politically sensitive study. Although a 1986 ban on commercial whaling has increased their numbers, the ban should remain in effect because there are still far fewer whales than when Herman Melville wrote Moby Dick in 1851. "What we're saying is, the whales still have got a long way to go," said Joe Roman, a conservation biologist at Harvard and the study's lead author.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Michael Dresser and Jonathan Bor and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center have developed a new way of detecting cancers that requires patients to provide only a urine, saliva or sputum sample. Dr. David Sidransky said the test would allow doctors to find early cancers that are hard to detect with conventional methods such as biopsies. Labs would screen body fluids for genetic changes that are associated with cancer. The tests would be commercially available within the next five years, he said. "We now have an entirely new method of cancer detection that can be used when cancers are still amenable to early detection and cure," said Sidransky, a specialist in head and neck cancers.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1998
Four years after two Washington lawyers were slain execution-style in their weekend home on the Severn River, Anne Arundel prosecutors are trying for a second time to persuade a jury that an Arnold man committed the crime.Scotland E. Williams' 1995 double murder conviction and the death sentence he requested were overturned by the Maryland Court of Appeals in July 1996.In the retrial, which opened yesterday, jurors are in for lengthy biology lessons, according to one defense lawyer.Prosecutors are armed with a new kind of DNA evidence not available in the first trial.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1997
In old-fashioned murder mysteries, the killer's sweaty palms always give him away. The intuitive detective -- attentive, adept at reading human nature -- quickly recognizes them as a sure sign of guilt.Now, investigators say they require not intuition but DNA. They need only a drop of the sweat."When a person leaves any DNA at his crime scene, whether it's a drop of blood, saliva or perspiration, he's left us his calling card," says Paul Ferrara, a noted DNA researcher and head of Virginia's state crime laboratory, the Division of Forensic Science.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 5, 1998
COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. - As few as 500 or so people, trekking out of Africa 140,000 years ago, may have populated the rest of the globe. These estimates are derived from a novel kind of archaeology, one that depends not on pick and shovel but on delving into the capacious archive of the human genome.Dates and numbers based solely on genetic evidence are unlikely to be fully accepted until historians and archaeologists have had their say. But they afford a glimpse of the rich historical information embedded in the DNA of each human cell.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
As the Baltimore Ravens' march to victory in Super Bowl XLVII defied the common wisdom of the sports world, so, too, has an examination of the genetics of their winged namesakes in the western United States led one local biologist to evidence he says defies the common wisdom of his field. Kevin Omland, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, said he's the department's "mascot biologist. " It happens that he teaches at a university in Baltimore County and has studied both the raven and the Baltimore oriole, although not from homegrown rooting interest.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1998
Four years after two Washington lawyers were slain execution-style in their weekend home on the Severn River, Anne Arundel prosecutors are trying for a second time to persuade a jury that an Arnold man committed the crime.Scotland E. Williams' 1995 double murder conviction and the death sentence he requested were overturned by the Maryland Court of Appeals in July 1996.In the retrial, which opened yesterday, jurors are in for lengthy biology lessons, according to one defense lawyer.Prosecutors are armed with a new kind of DNA evidence not available in the first trial.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | October 13, 1996
Parkinson's disease may be caused by a genetic defect in the body's energy-producing cellular sructures, a finding that could lead to treatments to stall or prevent the debilitating disorder, according to a new study.Researchers at the University of Virginia are defying conventional genetic wisdom, suggesting that a mutation in mitochondrial DNA, rather than in the DNA that makes up chromosomes, can lead to common medical disorders such as Parkinson's.The disease leaves people with tremors and rigidity.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | February 1, 1994
Scientists seeking to learn when humans first began to populate the Americas have created an evolutionary "clock" that suggests the event must have occurred in the depths of an ice age nearly 30,000 years ago.If their claim is correct, it will more than double the antiquity of the "first Americans." Most archaeologists have long contended that the ancestors of today's multitude of Indian tribes could not have arrived in the Western Hemisphere any earlier than 12,000 to 15,000 years ago.In any event, the Indian tribes of the Americas, the true "Native Americans," do indeed go far back in time.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
The high-profile death-penalty retrial of Scotland E. Williams, which culminated in Friday's sentence of life in prison without parole for two murders, is raising critical questions that other defendants also face, defense lawyers say."There are issues that have come up in this case that I see as having a potential for trouble," said Nancy M. Cohen, one of Williams' three public defenders.The biggest issue, now in a federal appellate court, has piqued the interest of defense attorneys in the state because it challenges the FBI, whose expertise local law enforcement agencies turn to routinely.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 7, 1993
MOSCOW -- Forensic scientist Pavel Ivanov -- working with scientist Peter Gill and his team at Britain's central Home Office forensic laboratories in Aldermaston -- has achieved nearly miraculous results using new and still controversial technology to identify the bones of Czar Nicholas II and his family.The DNA matching process, pioneered in criminal cases by Mr. Gill in 1985, compares the patterns of deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up a person's unique genetic blueprint. But Mr. Ivanov had to work with bones, which carry much less DNA than living tissue or vital fluids.
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