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December 19, 2007
Roger Clemens "I want to state clearly and without qualification: I did not take steroids, human growth hormone or any other banned substances at any time in my baseball career or, in fact, my entire life. Those substances represent a dangerous and destructive shortcut that no athlete should ever take. I am disappointed that my 25 years in public life have apparently not earned me the benefit of the doubt, but I understand that Senator Mitchell's report has raised many serious questions.
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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2013
Major League Baseball has gone to great pains to move past its so-called steroid era, which gripped the game for more than a decade and stained the reputations of many of its greatest players. But nearly six years after the release of the Mitchell Report, which was designed to put an end to that period, baseball is again shadowed by a drug scandal that has fans and analysts wondering if the problem can ever be stamped out. About 20 players, including former Most Valuable Players Alex Rodriguez and Ryan Braun, could face suspensions of up to 100 games based on their dealings with the Biogenesis clinic in South Florida, according to an ESPN report.
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By DAVID STEELE | December 16, 2007
After everything the Mitchell Report laid out about the depth and breadth of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball, after all the suggestions and recommendations, after all the names were named and blame was assigned ... the same two foxes were left to guard the henhouse. Terrible mistake, and by far the biggest flaw in the report. Somewhere in those 409 pages should have been a demand for Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig and Players Association executive director Donald Fehr to be removed from their positions.
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August 23, 2010
7 months — 1 for each Cy Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Prejudging anyone is always dangerous. Trial by media is not exactly trial by jury. But necessary qualifiers aside, it sure looks like Roger Clemens is guilty, unless entitlement and delusional behavior are defenses. Major League Baseball had no reason to persecute one of its iconic pitchers, yet it named him as a steroid cheat in the Mitchell report, chronicling a pattern of use that dated back to his revitalization in Toronto in 1998.
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By RICK MAESE | December 14, 2007
At 5 feet 9 and 175 pounds, he is among the smallest players linked to performance-enhancing drugs by the Mitchell Report. Small in stature, but not in significance. The Orioles were recurring characters in the 409-page report. Of the 80-plus players outed in the report, 19 had passed through the Orioles' clubhouse and were linked to performance-enhancing drugs with varying degrees of evidence. But of all the accused, it's Brian Roberts' case that best illustrates all that was wrong with the Mitchell investigation.
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By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2007
Congress recoiled from the Mitchell Report with indignation and outrage yesterday, then promised to cleanse baseball of performance-enhancing drugs in so many carefully crafted statements. Rep. Cliff Stearns of Florida wants Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig to step down for his handling of the steroids crisis. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland not only wants baseball to implement the recommendations of former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, who wrote the 409-page report, but also to investigate amphetamine use next.
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By Peter Schmuck | February 8, 2009
News item: Sports Illustrated reported on its Web site yesterday that several sources have confirmed Alex Rodriguez tested positive for anabolic steroids while playing for the Texas Rangers in 2003. My take: Is it too late to get that into the Mitchell Report? The Joe Torre book? Bonus take: No, really. The Mitchell Report was funded by Major League Baseball to peel the cover off the game's steroid scandal, and it didn't include a positive steroid test - administered by MLB - involving the game's greatest player.
NEWS
March 4, 1999
THE International Olympic Committee will meet March 17 to consider bribery allegations against 13 of its members. This is in addition to the 9 who have resigned or been expelled and more who have been named in connection to Salt Lake City playing host to the 2002 Winter Games. To date, some 30 of 115 former IOC members are under a cloud involving bribes and extortion in the award of bids to Olympic cities.The Olympic movement is no better than the integrity of its competitions. Quite obviously, that extends to the self-perpetuating IOC itself.
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | December 9, 2007
Nashville, Tenn. -- One of the unseen benefits of holding Major League Baseball's winter meetings last week at the gigantic Opryland Resort is that there was plenty of space to accommodate the elephant in the middle of every meeting room. Perhaps as soon as midweek, the result of the independent investigation of performance-enhancing drug use in baseball - dubbed the Mitchell Report after lead investigator and former Sen. George Mitchell - will be released. Baseball is holding its collective breath while assuming dozens of current and former players will be implicated, creating further embarrassment for a sport that has been entangled in steroid controversies for most of the decade.
NEWS
By Stefen Lovelace and Stefen Lovelace,Sun reporter | December 16, 2007
While the release of the Mitchell Report sparked debates about major league baseball players' Hall of Fame worthiness and tainted record books, the issue of performance-enhancing drugs is much more personal to others. "This is more than about asterisks and cheating; it's about the lives and health of our kids," Don Hooton said Thursday at the Mitchell Report news conference in New York. Hooton's 17-year-old son, Taylor, committed suicide in 2003 after using anabolic steroids. Powered by ME!
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | January 24, 2010
More than two years after Miguel Tejada was traded to the Houston Astros for five players to start a massive rebuilding project, he will return to the Orioles with a lot less fanfare and at a different position. In a somewhat surprising move that goes against several of Andy MacPhail's tendencies, the Orioles agreed to terms Saturday on a one-year, $6 million deal with Tejada to be the team's regular third baseman, a role he has never filled in his 13-year big league career. The deal won't be complete until Tejada passes a physical, which is scheduled for Tuesday.
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By Jeff Zrebiec | jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | January 24, 2010
More than two years after Miguel Tejada was traded to the Houston Astros for five players to start a massive rebuilding project, he will return to the Orioles with a lot less fanfare and at a different position. In a somewhat surprising move that goes against several of Andy MacPhail's tendencies, the Orioles agreed to terms Saturday on a one-year, $6 million deal with Tejada to be the team's regular third baseman, a role he has never filled in his 13-year big league career. The deal won't be complete until Tejada passes a physical, which is scheduled for Tuesday.
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By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
Pitchers and catchers are reporting, which means it's time once again to ask how much longer fans plan to put up with what baseball is doing with performance-enhancing drugs. Maybe this is the year, and this is the moment, they stop, with Alex Rodriguez's failed drug test stinking up spring training. But if last year wasn't it - after the Mitchell Report, after the Roger Clemens circus, after Barry Bonds' numbers still taunted everybody even as he was being blackballed from the game - then it will never happen.
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
A package of human growth hormone was delivered to Larry Bigbie's home in Northwest Indiana at Christmastime 2005. Within 10 minutes, federal investigators were at the former Orioles outfielder's door. Bigbie knew he was busted. He said he had no choice but to answer questions from the investigators, including Jeff Novitzky, the Internal Revenue Service special agent who made headlines in the Barry Bonds-Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative scandal. Then, for two years after that interrogation, Bigbie waited, mostly in silence, for his testimony to become public.
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By Peter Schmuck | February 8, 2009
News item: Sports Illustrated reported on its Web site yesterday that several sources have confirmed Alex Rodriguez tested positive for anabolic steroids while playing for the Texas Rangers in 2003. My take: Is it too late to get that into the Mitchell Report? The Joe Torre book? Bonus take: No, really. The Mitchell Report was funded by Major League Baseball to peel the cover off the game's steroid scandal, and it didn't include a positive steroid test - administered by MLB - involving the game's greatest player.
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By DAN CONNOLLY | July 6, 2008
Observations, opinions and musings from last week in major league baseball. Former Orioles outfielder Jay Gibbons, now attempting a comeback with the Long Island Ducks of the independent Atlantic League, has become the poster boy for Mitchell Report players looking to get back into big league ball. He's not the only one, though. In fact, he's not even the only ex-Oriole-turned-Duck looking to shake the Mitchell Report stigma. Former Orioles reliever Todd Williams is also toiling with Long Island, hoping he gets another chance to pitch in affiliated ball.
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By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | January 15, 2008
WASHINGTON -- A House committee plans to revisit statements made by former Orioles All-Star Miguel Tejada in 2005 to see whether the shortstop's story is consistent with information contained in the Mitchell Report, according to two sources with knowledge of the inquiry. The Oversight and Government Reform Committee will look for discrepancies between what Tejada told committee staff in August 2005 and what investigators for former Sen. George Mitchell concluded about him in last month's report on steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs.
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By Ken Davidoff and Jim Baumbach and Ken Davidoff and Jim Baumbach,NEWSDAY | December 14, 2007
NEW YORK -- New York Yankees pitchers Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte are the most prominent players identified as users of performance-enhancing drugs in the Mitchell Report, which was released yesterday. The most stunning aspect of the report, which was completed by former Sen. George Mitchell, is the great detail with which he goes into Clemens' past, based on eyewitness testimony by the pitcher's longtime trainer, Brian McNamee. Considering how quickly public opinion turned against slugger Mark McGwire, Clemens' Hall of Fame status could be in question.
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By DAVID STEELE | May 1, 2008
Somewhere, Barry Bonds is laughing. He's not working, but he's got to be laughing. Bonds, stuck in baseball limbo, probably is following the latest round of unsavory reports about Roger Clemens, this time involving - yuck - an underage girl. Bonds' sport rejoiced as it washed its hands of him last offseason, even though he escaped with the all-time home run mark. Still, it was supposed to have been that simple: Out goes Bonds, out goes our "problem." Now, a fresh dump truck-load of dirt lands on Clemens every other week, and as it does, it also lands on baseball.
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By DAN CONNOLLY | April 20, 2008
Observations, opinions and musings from the week in Major League Baseball: The Misadventures of Misunderstood Miggi continued last week. After being confronted - some might say ambushed - by an ESPN reporter holding a birth certificate, Miguel Tejada admitted to the Houston Astros that he was two years older than he had previously claimed, meaning he turns 34 next month, not 32. It's one more reason trading him in December to the Astros for five players...
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