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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2008
Joseph J. Rishel, curator of pre-1900 European painting at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, drew a near-capacity audience for his talk on the current Mitchell Gallery exhibition The Elegant Salon: European Academic Paintings from the Syracuse University Art Collection. He shared his observations on the paintings displayed from the collection amassed by Annie Walter Arents that was given to Syracuse University in 1949. We had gone to St. John's Mitchell Gallery two days earlier so we could view the collection without the crowds.
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October 10, 2014
'Reflections' Works by the Anne Arundel Community College Printmaking Club are on view through Sunday, Oct. 12, in the Willow Gallery at Quiet Waters Park, 600 Quiet Waters Park Road in Annapolis. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The park charges a daily entry fee of $6 per car. Information: 410-222-1777 or friendsofquietwaterspark.org. 'Beautiful Maryland' Works by the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators will be on view through Sunday, Oct. 12, at Quiet Waters Park, 600 Quiet Waters Park Road in Annapolis.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 1999
Plenty of emotion will be on display at the Mitchell Gallery at St. John's College in the coming weeks as the museum exhibits 45 illustrations by the French artist, Georges Rouault (1871-1958).Rouault was an expressionist, an artist who abandoned traditional forms in favor of distorted shapes and colors designed to express visceral feelings and emotions.Rouault left school in his early teens and worked as an apprentice in a stained-glass workshop.The illustrations in the exhibition, on loan from the Syracuse University art collection, demonstrate that the darkly highlighted outlines and vibrant colors Rouault encountered as a young glass-maker never left his work.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 2000
Perched on the Chesapeake and defined by its status as the prime training ground for naval officers, Annapolis maintains a connection to ships and the people who sail them that is second to none. So if ever an art exhibition was tied to the heart and soul of its host city, it would be "Ship to Shore: Marine Paintings from the Butler Institute of Art," at the Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College through Oct. 15. The past 150 years have brought a tremendous change in the history of travel.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2000
What do John Wayne, Mick Jagger, Coca-Cola bottles, dollar bills, Campbell's soup cans, Marilyn Monroe and Apollo astronauts have in common? As most baby boomers can tell you, all were images celebrated in the art of Andy Warhol, the Pittsburgh-born commercial artist whose eye for the icons of American culture did so much to set off the Pop Art craze of the 1960s. Famous for pioneering the process whereby a photographic image is transferred to a silk screen, then placed on a canvas and inked at the back, Warhol became one of the most debated and influential artists of the late 20th century.
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By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2006
The Art of Music -- In Performance marks the first collaboration between the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra and the Mitchell Gallery at St. John's College. The exhibition showcasing more than 40 music-related works from the Baltimore Museum of Art's collection will be on display at the gallery through April 9. On March 3, music and art lovers will be treated to a concert combining these two art forms featuring pianist Rachel Franklin. ASO President R. Lee Streby said, "I'm excited at the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's collaborating with another arts organization for three main reasons.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 2001
Bloody sacrificial rituals to the contrary, the Mayans developed one of the most advanced civilizations of the ancient world. They came up with the most complicated system of writing the Americas had ever seen. Mayan astronomers and mathematicians put their European counterparts to shame, calculating the duration of the year to within a day of its true length while predicting eclipses and the risings and settings of the planets with uncanny accuracy. Such achievements did not confer temporal immortality, though, for the ninth and 10th centuries saw a collapse of the Mayan way of life that still has archaeologists baffled.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2002
At the Mitchell Gallery, they don't believe in falling into ruts. In January and February, art lovers came to the intimate museum on the campus of St. John's College to view the elegant, meticulously crafted handiwork of James McNeill Whistler. Now, through April 20, the gallery is playing host to 21 works of modern art in an exhibit titled The New York School and Beyond. Abstract expressionism is the name of the game, and as one views the brash, hyperkinetic slabs of color pushed and pulled onto the canvas by the likes of Jackson Pollock, Hans Hoffman and the rest, the restrained harmony of Whistler seems far off, indeed.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2003
Life may indeed imitate art, but the deal is commutative. Art also imitates life. And the century just past, with its world wars, holocausts, nuclear explosions, five-year plans and media-fed mass culture, has inspired a body of art as depressing, angst-ridden and emotionally raw as the era that spawned it. That's why the varied works of Alexander Calder (1898-1976) are such a delight. Ingenuity, clarity and a spirit of play animate the prints, sculptures, mobiles, etchings, lithographs, woolen tapestries and book illustrations churned out with such regularity by the Pennsylvania-born artist, whose breezy inner vision did so much to leaven the heaviness of his aesthetic time.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2006
History was made last Friday with a concert marking the first collaboration between the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra and the Mitchell Gallery at St. John's College. The Art of Music -- In Performance was an extraordinary accomplishment for both arts organizations, revealing the synergistic aspects of combining art and music. The concert was a revelation in displaying the major talent that exists locally. At St. John's Key Auditorium, an attentive audience of 260 discovered how exciting chamber music can be in the hands of five young musicians of superb artistry and technique.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2000
From the prairie, to the Rockies and Sierras, to the Pacific, the American West has captured our imagination as no other region of our vast and beautiful country. That point will prove hard to escape when you take in "The Phelan Collection of Western Art," which is on display at the Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis. The collection of 50 paintings, prints, drawings and photographs from the 19th century revolves around three main themes: scenic splendor, Western settlement and Manifest Destiny's human side.
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