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By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2003
In the course of his life, former city councilman and state Sen. Michael B. Mitchell, scion of Maryland's politically influential Mitchell family, has alternately seen his name celebrated with distinction and sullied by wrongdoing. Now he is under scrutiny in a federal racketeering case in which he is not a defendant but has been portrayed in testimony as a close adviser to a pair of convicted drug dealers who authorities say used nightclubs to disguise illegal activities. Yesterday, a federal judge described him as "uncharged alleged co-conspirator," and a key witness linked him to an alleged attempt at witness tampering.
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NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | August 23, 2007
Paul S. Sarbanes, the recently retired U.S. senator, has been spotted at the Waverly Farmers' Market stumping for his son. Dr. Nina Rawlings' voice reverberates on the radio, recalling the impact of her late husband, Del. Howard P. Rawlings, on their daughter. And City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. invokes his uncle, Maryland's first African-American congressman, in a television ad for his mayoral candidacy. Familiar last names abound among many of the leading candidates in this year's city elections, and experts say it's not hard to figure out why: Voters feel more comfortable electing newcomers whose relatives they've put into public office.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
A convicted heroin dealer now facing racketeering charges was approached in early 2000 by federal investigators who wanted him to work as a cooperating witness in an investigation of Baltimore's prominent Mitchell family, the man's attorney said yesterday. Records show that James E. Gross Sr., on trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, was allowed to remain out of jail in 2000 as a government witness, even though authorities believed they had evidence that he and his crime partner, Louis W. Colvin, had returned to the drug business within a year of their release from federal prison.
NEWS
By John Fritze | July 27, 2007
Baltimore City Councilman and mayoral candidate Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. airs the second television commercial of this year's mayoral race today, focusing on two issues: Crime and his family background. The 30-second spot, according to the campaign, is the "first in a series." What the ad says: As a dizzying array of black-and-white pictures of crime scenes appear, Mitchell - in his own voice - says, "Today, we're facing a murder crisis in Baltimore. I'm Keiffer Mitchell. I will change things."
NEWS
By S. Mitra Kalita and S. Mitra Kalita,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
Saying he wants justice, a Shipley's Choice man announced a $7,500 reward yesterday for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the arsonist who partially destroyed his home.Steve Mitchell, owner of the house on Linden Shade Court, said he decided to offer the reward after fire officials reached a dead end in their three-month investigation. Mitchell is putting up $2,500 of the reward; his insurance company would pay the rest.Fire officials, who confirmed that the March 7 fire was deliberately set, would not discuss the investigation or any motives.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | August 9, 1994
At high noon on a steamy summer day, Clarence M. Mitchell IV stands outside the Eutaw Street entrance to Lexington Market, pressing the flesh of lunch goers and passing out a brochure touting his campaign for House of Delegates in the 44th Legislative District.Some react to the slender young man in the dark suit indifferently; some respond quizzically, as if trying to connect the face with the famous name.But others are enthusiastic."Oh, Clarence," Delores McKay says effusively. "I know your father."
NEWS
By John Fritze | July 27, 2007
Baltimore City Councilman and mayoral candidate Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. airs the second television commercial of this year's mayoral race today, focusing on two issues: Crime and his family background. The 30-second spot, according to the campaign, is the "first in a series." What the ad says: As a dizzying array of black-and-white pictures of crime scenes appear, Mitchell - in his own voice - says, "Today, we're facing a murder crisis in Baltimore. I'm Keiffer Mitchell. I will change things."
NEWS
July 10, 2002
THE SIGNIFICANCE of local elections can fade quickly into the fog of rhetoric and promises. But this year in Baltimore, the stakes are clear, concrete and immediate. With two fewer senators as the result of population loss, the city's legislative delegation will approach city issues in Annapolis -- including the need for financial help -- with vastly diminished power. And Baltimoreans actually could make the power outage worse. The historic drive for more African-American representation could collide with the city's need to retain an important power source.
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne | January 14, 2002
IT'S A LONG, long downhill from the titanic struggle for passage of the great civil rights laws of the 1960s to the current cat fight over the redistricting of a state Senate seat in Baltimore. But key participants in both battles were and are named Clarence Mitchell, and therein lies a tale. The first was the late Clarence Mitchell Jr., chief lobbyist of the NAACP and the so-called "101st Senator" because of his deep involvement in legislation that guaranteed the ballot and opened places of public accommodation to African-Americans 40 years ago. Baltimore's courthouse is named after him. The second is his grandson, Clarence Mitchell IV, who is threatening to leave the Democratic Party in a desperate effort to save his seat in Annapolis from the payback redistricting plans of Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
BUSINESS
By Patricia A. Granata and Patricia A. Granata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 25, 1999
When you ask Fred Mitchell about Perryman, the community in which he has spent the last 66 years, what you get is a history of a small area only slowly affected by the touches of time."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and David Nitkin and Eric Siegel and David Nitkin,Sun reporters | May 30, 2007
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who grew up in Little Italy, said, "The Mitchell family was revered in my home." With the death of Parren J. Mitchell, the first African-American elected to Congress from Maryland, Pelosi said, "Baltimore has lost one of its favorite sons." Mitchell, a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus, died Monday at age 85 of complications from pneumonia. The Mitchell family will receive visitors from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday and from 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday at the St. James Parish Center, 1020 W. Lafayette Ave., where photos and memorabilia from Mitchell's life and career will be on display.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | May 29, 2007
Parren J. Mitchell, the first African-American elected to Congress from Maryland and a lifelong crusader for social justice for the nation's minorities, died yesterday of complications from pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 85 and had lived in a nursing home since a series of strokes several years ago. A founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus and later its chairman, Mr. Mitchell was the younger brother of Clarence M. Mitchell Jr., Washington lobbyist for the NAACP in the hard-won civil rights struggles in Congress of the 1960s and 1970s.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2003
In the course of his life, former city councilman and state Sen. Michael B. Mitchell, scion of Maryland's politically influential Mitchell family, has alternately seen his name celebrated with distinction and sullied by wrongdoing. Now he is under scrutiny in a federal racketeering case in which he is not a defendant but has been portrayed in testimony as a close adviser to a pair of convicted drug dealers who authorities say used nightclubs to disguise illegal activities. Yesterday, a federal judge described him as "uncharged alleged co-conspirator," and a key witness linked him to an alleged attempt at witness tampering.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
A convicted heroin dealer now facing racketeering charges was approached in early 2000 by federal investigators who wanted him to work as a cooperating witness in an investigation of Baltimore's prominent Mitchell family, the man's attorney said yesterday. Records show that James E. Gross Sr., on trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, was allowed to remain out of jail in 2000 as a government witness, even though authorities believed they had evidence that he and his crime partner, Louis W. Colvin, had returned to the drug business within a year of their release from federal prison.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2002
A lawsuit against former congressman Parren J. Mitchell has apparently been settled, with the ailing civil rights leader agreeing to pay $6,500 owed for a loan on a car he never got to drive. Papers filed this week in District Court in Baltimore indicate that Mitchell, 80, who has resided in a nursing home for several years, agreed to pay the money to the General Motors Acceptance Corp. The credit company sued Mitchell earlier this year after he failed to make payments on a 1998 Buick Century purchased in his name by his nephew, Michael B. Mitchell, a former state senator and city councilman.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2002
For 40 years, no matter how strong their position, members of the Mitchell family have approached each election as if they were the underdogs. But in the case of state Sen. Clarence M. Mitchell IV's bid for a second term from Baltimore's 44th Legislative District, that beleaguered feeling may be as much a reflection of reality as pre-election anxiety. Saddled with a reprimand from the General Assembly's ethics committee, and having alienated most of his fellow Democratic lawmakers with his backing of Republican gubernatorial candidate Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., Mitchell is facing a stiff challenge from one-term Del. Verna L. Jones.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and David Nitkin and Eric Siegel and David Nitkin,Sun reporters | May 30, 2007
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who grew up in Little Italy, said, "The Mitchell family was revered in my home." With the death of Parren J. Mitchell, the first African-American elected to Congress from Maryland, Pelosi said, "Baltimore has lost one of its favorite sons." Mitchell, a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus, died Monday at age 85 of complications from pneumonia. The Mitchell family will receive visitors from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday and from 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday at the St. James Parish Center, 1020 W. Lafayette Ave., where photos and memorabilia from Mitchell's life and career will be on display.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2002
A lawsuit against former congressman Parren J. Mitchell has apparently been settled, with the ailing civil rights leader agreeing to pay $6,500 owed for a loan on a car he never got to drive. Papers filed this week in District Court in Baltimore indicate that Mitchell, 80, who has resided in a nursing home for several years, agreed to pay the money to the General Motors Acceptance Corp. The credit company sued Mitchell earlier this year after he failed to make payments on a 1998 Buick Century purchased in his name by his nephew, Michael B. Mitchell, a former state senator and city councilman.
NEWS
August 20, 2002
Bills offer voters City Council size, makeup choices Baltimore voters deserve a choice. And on Aug. 12 the City Council approved two charter amendments in support of the issues raised by the citizens' coalition to reduce the council size ("Politics of sabotage," editorial, Aug. 14). Two years ago, the Commission on Council Representation, a volunteer group including members from labor, academia, elected officials and the community, reviewed council structures from around the country, held two public forums and gathered written input before making its 17 recommendations.
NEWS
July 10, 2002
THE SIGNIFICANCE of local elections can fade quickly into the fog of rhetoric and promises. But this year in Baltimore, the stakes are clear, concrete and immediate. With two fewer senators as the result of population loss, the city's legislative delegation will approach city issues in Annapolis -- including the need for financial help -- with vastly diminished power. And Baltimoreans actually could make the power outage worse. The historic drive for more African-American representation could collide with the city's need to retain an important power source.
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