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October 13, 2011
Editor: I am proud of the services performed by our volunteer fire and rescue teams in Harford County. These volunteers do an amazing job for our citizens. Their good works, however do not give them the right to use government funds supplied by our tax payers without some kind of accounting. Every organization should be held accountable for the funds that are spent. Proper accounting avoids mistrust and potential irregularities. Philip Einhorn Bel Air
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NEWS
August 31, 2014
While I believe that many of Baltimore County School Supt. Dallas Dance's intentions are noble, I take issue with the means he has employed to implement them ( "Stop beating up on county school superintendent Dallas Dance," Aug. 25). His actions not only have left many people frustrated and upset with the superintendent but caused a significant part of the community to mistrust him over his stonewalling, the lack of real dialogue and transparency at meetings and his repetitive meme of "looking forward to working with the community" that is never realized.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | March 10, 2010
The Baltimore City School Police Force wants to protect students. The Baltimore Police Department wants to protect the city. Both goals are laudable, and agencies should be able to accomplish both simultaneously. But last week, school authorities put their interests first. They waited a day to tell city police that they had arrested a third-grader wandering the halls of Sharp-Leadenhall Elementary School with a loaded handgun. They pointed to the boy's age, 8, and his status as a special-needs student.
NEWS
May 27, 2014
Perhaps someday in the future, forensic psychiatrists and others will analyze the circumstances of last Friday's mass shooting near Santa Barbara, Calif. from medical records, family interviews and YouTube videos and determine definitively what was going inside the mind of suspected gunman Elliot Rodger. That he hated women was obviously a significant piece of the puzzle. Was it that anger that caused him to plan the rampage, post his manifesto on the Internet and ultimately kill six people and injure 13 before killing himself, or was that simply the delusion on which a suicidal 22-year-old became obsessed?
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | December 18, 1990
As AIDS takes a disproportionate toll on the black community, a historic mistrust of medical authorities bred by years of discrimination has kept many infected blacks from being tested and getting early treatment.This was the view that a series of black doctors and community activists presented yesterday to the National Commission on AIDS, a presidential panel that opened two days of testimony on the impact of acquired immune deficiency syndrome on black Americans.The meeting, held yesterday at Baltimore City Hall, will resume today at the Peabody Court Hotel.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Doug Struck and Dan Fesperman and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | March 3, 1994
HEBRON, Israeli-Occupied West Bank -- With his young son in his lap and his neighbors around him, Dr. Baruch Goldstein sat in his community synagogue last Thursday night to hear the traditional reading of the Book of Esther. It is a tale of wily plots and Old Testament triumph, in which the beleaguered Jews of Babylon turn the tables on a scheming foe.At its climax, the story turns bloody: "So the Jews smote all their enemies with the sword, slaughtering and destroying them, and did as they pleased to those who hated them."
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | November 4, 2007
The Federal Reserve gave the economy another teaspoonful of tonic last week, and investors gulped it down and liked it. But it's too early to expect a clean bill of health. The incubation period for economic remedies and problems is often six to 12 months, and the economy could be sickened by more than tumbling home prices and the potential that house-poor consumers might not spend much. There remains a hangover from midsummer's credit crunch and continuing weakness and mistrust in the financial system as the nation's largest banking firms start reporting the damage they caused themselves and investors by cavalierly creating securities backed by undependable subprime mortgages.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Iran's president rejected anew last night the possibility of an official dialogue with Washington anytime soon. But he called for the peoples of the two countries to expand their understanding of each other through academic and cultural exchanges.In what was billed as a message to the American people, President Mohammad Khatami said in an unusual interview with CNN that before the two nations could end 19 years of antagonism, there must first be "a crack in the wall of mistrust."
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Baltimore City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts has myriad issues to tackle as we delve deeper into 2013. Some priorities are the open air drug markets on our streets, the vacant housing issue (which has devoured many a city rowhouse), gangs, homelessness, and finding ways to make our neighborhoods and communities safer places in which to live. The major impediment or obstacle the commissioner is facing is the inherent mistrust of many of his constituents. For some city residents, this mindset has crossed generations.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
Like many at Johns Hopkins Hospital, I have been closely following the contract talks between management and the hospital's 2,000 union caregivers ("Hopkins, union to begin negotiating again," April 23). Everyone who cares for patients at Johns Hopkins knows how hard our union colleagues work and how essential they are. That's why it's been troubling to learn that many of them are struggling with low pay - pay that's actually below the federal poverty level in many cases. Hopkins has made significant contributions to the surrounding community, but there's been a long history of strained relations as well.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
Like many at Johns Hopkins Hospital, I have been closely following the contract talks between management and the hospital's 2,000 union caregivers ("Hopkins, union to begin negotiating again," April 23). Everyone who cares for patients at Johns Hopkins knows how hard our union colleagues work and how essential they are. That's why it's been troubling to learn that many of them are struggling with low pay - pay that's actually below the federal poverty level in many cases. Hopkins has made significant contributions to the surrounding community, but there's been a long history of strained relations as well.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 8, 2013
Every time I drive between Baltimore and Washington and come upon those big, spooky National Security Agency buildings in Fort Meade, I have cinematic thoughts about what goes on inside. I imagine the best and brightest of surveillance nerds spying on nuclear activity in Iran, on terrorist training camps in Yemen, on Kim Jong-un's playroom in North Korea. I also assume they're watching me as I drive along Route 32, taking my picture and running it through face-recognition software, recording the license plate on my car. If there's a cellphone in use, they're probably listening to the conversation, too. But wait.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Baltimore City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts has myriad issues to tackle as we delve deeper into 2013. Some priorities are the open air drug markets on our streets, the vacant housing issue (which has devoured many a city rowhouse), gangs, homelessness, and finding ways to make our neighborhoods and communities safer places in which to live. The major impediment or obstacle the commissioner is facing is the inherent mistrust of many of his constituents. For some city residents, this mindset has crossed generations.
EXPLORE
October 13, 2011
Editor: I am proud of the services performed by our volunteer fire and rescue teams in Harford County. These volunteers do an amazing job for our citizens. Their good works, however do not give them the right to use government funds supplied by our tax payers without some kind of accounting. Every organization should be held accountable for the funds that are spent. Proper accounting avoids mistrust and potential irregularities. Philip Einhorn Bel Air
NEWS
June 20, 2010
There's nothing unusual about House Speaker Michael E. Busch's efforts to solicit corporate sponsorships for the National Speakers Conference he's hosting in Annapolis this weekend, which will treat some of the most influential members of 30 state legislatures to a crab feast, Chesapeake cruise, golf and a fireworks display at Fort McHenry. And that's the problem. The Washington Post's John Wagner reported Wednesday that corporate sponsors, companies with business before Maryland's legislature and those of other states, are footing the tab to the tune of more than $500,000.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | March 10, 2010
The Baltimore City School Police Force wants to protect students. The Baltimore Police Department wants to protect the city. Both goals are laudable, and agencies should be able to accomplish both simultaneously. But last week, school authorities put their interests first. They waited a day to tell city police that they had arrested a third-grader wandering the halls of Sharp-Leadenhall Elementary School with a loaded handgun. They pointed to the boy's age, 8, and his status as a special-needs student.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 31, 2001
SO, BALTIMORE'S state's attorney, Patricia Jessamy, thinks city jurors are a dull, unsophisticated lot with biases against police officers, does she? As one of those jurors, I take umbrage at Jessamy's charge, and at the clamoring of others calling for jury trials to be abolished. Contrary to Jessamy's claim, Baltimore's jurors may be more savvy than our counterparts in surrounding counties. We get called for jury duty so often most of us are experts at it. I've lost count of the number of times I've been called.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | November 25, 1993
PRAGUE, Czech Republic -- Eduard Krhutek shuffles through the pile of police reports on his desk and shakes his head in disgust."Before the revolution, we'd have maybe 40 or 50 reports a day," says the lieutenant colonel with the beleaguered Czech national police. "Now we've got more than 250."Four years after the revolutions, wall-bashing and democracy-building that brought an end to four decades of communism in Eastern Europe, the region's major cities often seem to have become rough-and-tumble battlegrounds for outlaws.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
As the crowd filed out of Wednesday's town hall meeting, Andrea Wimmer sat in her wheelchair under a tree, holding a neon-yellow sign that said, "When Obama rations out health care based on the 'worth' of a person, I'm screwed." Two years ago, shortly after her high school graduation, Wimmer was in an auto accident that left her partly paralyzed and in need of weeks of hospitalization and therapy. Wimmer, now 20 and planning to enroll in classes at Hagerstown Community College, attended the town hall meeting along with her mother to show their opposition to the president's plan to overhaul health care.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 24, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The U.S.-led effort to choke off the financing used by al-Qaida and other terrorist groups is foundering because an array of setbacks at home and abroad has undermined the Bush administration's highly touted counterterrorism weapon, according to current and former officials and independent experts. In some cases, extremist groups have managed to blunt financial anti-terror tools by finding new ways to raise, transfer and spend their money. In other cases, the administration's campaign has stumbled because of legal difficulties and interagency infighting, officials and experts say. But the most serious problems have come from fractures and mistrust within the increasingly fragile coalition of nations that the United States admits it needs to target financiers of terrorism and to stanch the flow of funding from wealthy donors to extremist causes around the world.
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