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NEWS
July 30, 2010
BALTIMORE (AP) — A Baltimore judge has declared a mistrial in the murder trial of a man accused shooting a cab driver. Circuit Judge George L. Russell III declared the trial of 23-year-old Robert Lee Murphy of Baltimore inconclusive Friday afternoon. Murphy was charged with murder, assault and handgun charges in the death of 47-year-old Stephen Mauk. Mauk's body was found Jan. 26, 2009 in his cab. He'd been shot in the head. His employer had last heard from him when he was dispatched to pick up a fare for a local trip in Frederick.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
A Baltimore jury failed to reach a verdict Tuesday in a high-profile murder case, leading a city judge to declare a mistrial in city prosecutors' first battle with what they say is a murderous group within the Black Guerrilla Family gang. A juror who declined to give her name said a majority on the panel had been leaning toward acquitting David Hunter, an alleged BGF member who was charged with murder in the broad-daylight killing of heroin dealer Henry Mills on Greenmount Avenue three years ago. At its heart, Hunter's case was a simple matter: The jury was asked to weigh the credibility of eyewitnesses to Mills' June 2011 death.
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NEWS
August 12, 1993
The strange disappearance of a juror during deliberations on the manslaughter charges against a city policeman has complicated an already difficult case. There is no evidence that the juror's failure to show up for a whole day, until hauled in by police, was related to the case itself.He has been held in contempt of court, and there the matter rests.Still, the juror's failure to appear for a day caused a mistrial in a case that has aroused strong emotions because it involves a police officer standing accused of shooting without justification a 14-year-old suspected auto thief.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Though a Baltimore County jury agreed that former cardiologist Mark Midei placed stents in Glenn Weinberg's heart unnecessarily, one juror said panel members did not all agree that the procedure caused the prominent businessman to miss out on a stake in Maryland's largest casino. "It was hard to prove that the main factor of him missing out on Maryland Live was the placement of the stents," said Eric D. Goodman, who was juror No. 7 during the six-week trial. Weinberg was an executive with the Cordish Cos., which took on the Anne Arundel County casino project while he was recuperating.
NEWS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
A Howard County judge declared a mistrial in the case of a former JROTC instructor charged with having sex with a 17-year-old student, when a jury was unable to reach a verdict after deliberating for a little more than three hours. After weighing the case against Sgt. Charles Ray Moore of Bowie for about three hours and 15 minutes — including a dinner break — the jury sent a note to Judge Timothy McCrone it was hopelessly deadlocked. McCrone declared a mistrial, and the jury was dismissed.
NEWS
August 11, 1993
Hard cases make bad law, according to a lawyer's adage. They also make for tough decisions by judges and lawyers. There was no textbook solution to the predicament caused in the manslaughter trial of Baltimore Police Officer Edward T. Gorwell when a juror failed to show up during deliberations.Searching through court decisions around the country, Judge Ellen M. Heller could not find a precedent. So she improvised, but eventually was forced to declare a mistrial. Everyone involved, including the defendant and the family of the youth he shot in a controversial incident, must go through another wrenching trial.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1994
A Howard County circuit judge who criticized a defense attorney in front of the jury during a murder trial in February was right to declare a mistrial, according to a ruling this week by the county's administrative judge.The ruling by Judge Raymond Kane Jr. means that Troy Lynn Brooks of Baltimore County will stand trial a second time in the October 1992 slaying of his longtime friend.The new trial has not been scheduled. Mr. Brooks' attorney, William H. Murphy Jr. of Baltimore, is expected to appeal Judge Kane's ruling to the state Court of Special Appeals.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1994
A Carroll judge presiding over a $5 million lawsuit against two Springfield Hospital Center police officers declared a mistrial yesterday after he learned that a defense attorney had failed to disclose a crucial piece of evidence uncovered more than a month before trial.Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. declared the mistrial at the request of Baltimore attorney Mark A. Epstein, who represents the plaintiff, Ida Hawkins of Woodlawn.Mr. Epstein asked for the mistrial after Assistant Attorney General Timothy J. Paulus told Judge Beck during the lunch recess yesterday -- the trial's fourth day -- that he had just learned that a report, which he believed could help vindicate his client, may not have been provided to Mrs. Hawkins.
NEWS
December 19, 1993
A county Circuit Court judge declared a mistrial early Thursday morning in the trial of a 26-year-old Edgewood man accused of rape, child abuse and related sexual offenses.No decision on retrying the case will be made until after the holidays, an assistant state's attorney said."Any decision will be made with the best interests of the children in mind," said M. Elizabeth Bowen, who prosecuted Nicholas Victor Lee, an unemployed construction worker.The Circuit Court jury had deliberated eight hours following the seven-day trial before returning to the courtroom at 2 a.m. Thursday with an apparent verdict.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | February 25, 1994
The trial of a man charged in the slaying of a longtime friend has ended in a mistrial after a Howard Circuit judge ordered jurors to disregard the defense attorney's "speeches and obnoxious comment."Judge James Dudley declared the mistrial late Wednesday. He explained that his instructions to the jurors were prejudicial to defendant Troy Lynn Brooks."The court . . . found a manifest necessity to declare a mistrial to protect the rights of the defendant," Judge Dudley said in his order, which detailed the events that led to the mistrial.
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
A Baltimore County judge declared a mistrial Wednesday in the latest malpractice case against former cardiologist Mark Midei and the former owners of St. Joseph Medical Center after jurors failed to agree on how much the plaintiff deserved in damages. The decision came after four days of tense deliberation among jurors who listened to six weeks of proceedings in the case. Baltimore developer Glenn Weinberg alleged that he scaled back his career and lost millions of dollars after the cardiologist wrongly led him to believe that he suffered from severe coronary artery disease and placed unnecessary stents in his heart.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
A jury declared Tuesday that it was hopelessly deadlocked over the case of a Baltimore police officer accused of secretly tape-recording a judge. The impasse triggered a mistrial that leaves the sergeant's fate uncertain. Sgt. Carlos M. Vila, an 18-year-veteran police officer, was charged with recording a telephone argument with a judge designated to sign search warrants after normal business hours. Prosecutors said the recording violated the state's wiretap laws. Vila wanted District Judge Joan B. Gordon to sign a warrant on a Saturday night to search a car in which a shooting victim had been found.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
The lawyer for a community association trying to stop a medical office complex from being built in Catonsville called for a mistrial Monday in a Baltimore County hearing on the project, saying his clients should be allowed to inspect records sought by state prosecutors in a recent inquiry into the proposed development. During the last day of testimony in the administrative hearing, attorney J. Carroll Holzer said the Kenwood Gardens Condominium Association had been denied "due process" in objecting to the Southwest Physicians Pavilion planned by Whalen Properties.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
A police surveillance video that was key evidence in the 2011 mistrial of Travers and Tremayne Johnson, accused of setting a pit bull on fire, will be presented to jurors in the brothers' retrial, a judge ruled Monday. Defense attorneys had sought to have the tape thrown out. An expert witness brought in by prosecutors said the video is of higher quality than many other surveillance tapes used in court, with twice as many frames per second as similar tapes. Distortions in the video that defense lawyers attacked are common and can be the result of many factors, Douglas Lacey, a forensic video analyst, said in court.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
A mistrial was declared Friday in the murder trial of a man charged with strangling a fellow patient at a state psychiatric hospital, a spokesman for Howard County prosecutors said. Jurors had deliberated for about 11 hours over two days before telling Circuit Judge Timothy J. McCrone that they were deadlocked. El Soundani El-Wahhabi, 51, also known as Saladin Taylor, is accused in the Sept. 26, 2010, death of Susan Sachs, 45, who was found strangled in her bed in the state's Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
A Baltimore County man accused in a gang rape at a Woodlawn roller rink was acquitted Monday of the most serious charges against him. But Davon Perry faces two counts on which the judge declared a mistrial after members of the jury said they were "hopelessly deadlocked. " Perry, 26, who was living in Pikesville before he was arrested in August 2010, showed no emotion when the seven-woman, five-man jury announced the verdict after about eight hours of deliberation that began Friday in Baltimore County Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
The murder trial of Tavon Donya Sands ended abruptly in a mistrial yesterday after a witness testified that an investigator showed him a series of photos that included the 21- year-old Columbia man's picture - information that prosecution and defense attorneys said caught them by surprise. Howard Circuit Judge Raymond J. Kane Jr. halted the proceedings during the trial's first full day of testimony, saying a mistrial was the only remedy. The issue, the lawyers said yesterday, was one of discovery - rules requiring that the state turn over any evidence relating to guilt or innocence of a defendant to the defense.
NEWS
By Sam Howe Verhovek and Sam Howe Verhovek,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2007
FORT LEWIS, Wash. -- A military judge abruptly declared a mistrial yesterday in the court-martial of an Army lieutenant who refused orders to go to Iraq, handing a temporary reprieve to the elated officer and leaving military prosecutors visibly stunned and angry with the ruling. The decision by the judge, Lt. Col. John Head, turned on the contentious issue of whether factual stipulations agreed to earlier by the prosecutors and the defense team amounted to a confession of guilt by the lieutenant, 28-year-old Ehren Watada, on the Army's charges of failure to deploy.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2011
City prosecutors have for the second time won the first conviction under the state's gang statute. Dajuan Marshall, 29, was convicted in August 2010 of first-degree murder, conspiracy to commit murder, and participation in a criminal gang - a statute enacted in Maryland in 2007 - in the 2008 killing of Kenneth "Cash" Jones, a leader in the Pasadena Denver Lanes Blood set abducted near The Block and later found dead in the trunk of a car. ...
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
The last of 22 people indicted in a drug-dealing conspiracy at the Gilmor Homes public housing complex in West Baltimore pleaded guilty this week, federal prosecutors said, ending the case shortly before a second trial was set to begin Monday. The first ended in mistrial last month. Dione Fauntleroy Jr., 27, and his father, Dione Fauntleroy Sr., 48, each admitted Thursday that they conspired with others to deal cocaine throughout Baltimore from 2009 through June 2010, when the group was indicted.
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