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By Barbara Pash | September 11, 2013
Ivelisse Page is on a mission. In 2011, Page launched Believe Big, a nonprofit foundation that helps cancer patients and their families through this traumatic, life-changing diagnosis. Based on her own experience as a colon cancer survivor, Page aims to educate the cancer community about the importance of combining conventional and complementary approaches to treatment. To that end, Believe Big is the primary backer of a clinical trial of mistletoe extract, an alternative therapy Page underwent, slated to begin at Johns Hopkins Medicine's Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center within the next six months.
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NEWS
By Barbara Pash | September 11, 2013
Ivelisse Page is on a mission. In 2011, Page launched Believe Big, a nonprofit foundation that helps cancer patients and their families through this traumatic, life-changing diagnosis. Based on her own experience as a colon cancer survivor, Page aims to educate the cancer community about the importance of combining conventional and complementary approaches to treatment. To that end, Believe Big is the primary backer of a clinical trial of mistletoe extract, an alternative therapy Page underwent, slated to begin at Johns Hopkins Medicine's Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center within the next six months.
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
I know mistletoe is poisonous, but what about other holiday plants? I have a toddler and a nutty cat that nibbles on everything. Mistletoe leaves and stems are indeed poisonous. The latex sap of poinsettia may cause contact dermatitis. Holly berries, yew (all parts), aucuba (all parts) and amaryllis bulbs can cause symptoms when ingested. Oriental bittersweet and English ivy are both highly problematic non-native invasive plants as well as being toxic, and should be carefully disposed of after use in decorations.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
I know mistletoe is poisonous, but what about other holiday plants? I have a toddler and a nutty cat that nibbles on everything. Mistletoe leaves and stems are indeed poisonous. The latex sap of poinsettia may cause contact dermatitis. Holly berries, yew (all parts), aucuba (all parts) and amaryllis bulbs can cause symptoms when ingested. Oriental bittersweet and English ivy are both highly problematic non-native invasive plants as well as being toxic, and should be carefully disposed of after use in decorations.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | December 20, 1990
The out-of-the-way little town of Priddy, Texas, is the place where an untold number of couples get their start. Where the makings of romance are ripe for the picking. Where kisses are conceived.This ranching community is home to one of the nation's biggest stashes of mistletoe. In what has become an annual rite, many people who live in the area trudge out to the countryside each fall to clip the mistletoe that grows wild and abundant on mesquite trees.They take it to a red-brick building on the main street, where they sell it to Robert Tiemann and his Holiday Mistletoe Co., which provides about 90 percent of the fresh mistletoe sold in the country.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 24, 1990
LAUREL -- John's Decision splashed her way to a hard-fought triumph in the $54,575 Mistletoe Stakes at Laurel Race Course yesterday. Her victory may have opened a door that her owner closed two weeks ago.John's Decision races in the colors of Janet Wayson, wife of Morgan "Sonny" Wayson Jr. The Waysons recently sold Thirty Eight Go Go -- an earner of over $850,000 -- but yesterday, they found themselves with another stakes winner."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2001
Scientists are discovering that mistletoe has more to do with the birds and the bees than just kissing. New research indicates that the romantic Christmas plant, best known for hanging above the head of someone you want to kiss, is essential to several species of birds, bees and animals. The plant is a parasite that attaches itself to trees. But when researchers recently looked at areas where mistletoe had run amok, they found increased populations of bees and birds that feed on the plant's whitish berries.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | December 20, 2008
Mistletoe is a striking collection of contradictions for a plant that has been so emblematic of Christmas for so many centuries. It is a symbol of new love because of the kiss-ing tradition, and yet the berries of the European mistletoe are toxic. The dwarf mistletoe is so rare that it is considered endangered in Maryland. But it is a parasitic plant, slowly draining the moisture and nutrients from its host trees and rendering them weak. Even mistletoe's sacred mythology is conflicting.
NEWS
By Bill Thompson | December 23, 2006
Here's what's wrong with the world today: Not enough people are kissing underneath the mistletoe. The festive use of the humble mistletoe dates to old European beliefs. Some ancient cultures vested the plant's dark green leaves and waxy, cream-hued berries with mystical powers of good fortune and fertility, which probably ushered in the custom of couples bussing beneath a small sprig dangling from a doorway. The tradition used to be as much a part of Christmas celebrations in America as socks hung from the fireplace mantle or cookies and milk left out for the arrival of the jolly fat man. But our unscientific survey of garden nurseries and florist shops brings the sad news that mistletoe - the genuine stuff that sprouts high up in the bark of hardwood trees -isn't much in demand anymore.
NEWS
By Judy Reilly and Judy Reilly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1995
MARK YOUR calendars for a round robin of craft shows. From Frizzellburg to New Windsor and on to Westminster, you'll find lovely things to admire and buy and good things to eat.Where to start? You might want to begin your tour of crafts at the St. Paul's United Methodist Church Early Bird Christmas Show.This one is a perennial favorite, with flower arrangements by Trudy Jo Snader of New Windsor and teddy bears and other fanciful crafts by Nikki Alban of Pennsylvania.The rooms, upstairs and down, will be filled with things that have been crafted by hand by area artists.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | November 5, 2012
The arrival of November means not only Thanksgiving in Carroll County. Craft fairs and bazaars fill the calendar this month, offering a variety of items to meet every budget. Now in its 39th year, Ascension Episcopal Church's Mistletoe Mart in Westminster features 50 craftsmen, and attracts an average of 3,000 people over its three-day run, Nov. 8-10, according to Joyce Brown, co-chair. The juried craft show traditionally has a waiting list of crafters wanting to participate.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | December 20, 2008
Mistletoe is a striking collection of contradictions for a plant that has been so emblematic of Christmas for so many centuries. It is a symbol of new love because of the kiss-ing tradition, and yet the berries of the European mistletoe are toxic. The dwarf mistletoe is so rare that it is considered endangered in Maryland. But it is a parasitic plant, slowly draining the moisture and nutrients from its host trees and rendering them weak. Even mistletoe's sacred mythology is conflicting.
NEWS
By Bill Thompson | December 23, 2006
Here's what's wrong with the world today: Not enough people are kissing underneath the mistletoe. The festive use of the humble mistletoe dates to old European beliefs. Some ancient cultures vested the plant's dark green leaves and waxy, cream-hued berries with mystical powers of good fortune and fertility, which probably ushered in the custom of couples bussing beneath a small sprig dangling from a doorway. The tradition used to be as much a part of Christmas celebrations in America as socks hung from the fireplace mantle or cookies and milk left out for the arrival of the jolly fat man. But our unscientific survey of garden nurseries and florist shops brings the sad news that mistletoe - the genuine stuff that sprouts high up in the bark of hardwood trees -isn't much in demand anymore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brooke Nevils | December 14, 2006
98 Degrees member and former Jessica Simpson husband Nick Lachey headlines Mix 106.5's Mistletoe Meltdown on Saturday at the Hippodrome Theatre. With his boy band on hiatus, the former Newlyweds star launched his solo career in 2003 with the critically panned SoulO. Since his divorce, Lachey's latest effort, What's Left of Me, has produced two hit singles, "What's Left of Me" and "I Can't Hate You Anymore." The show starts at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Hippodrome, 12 N. Eutaw St. Tickets are $39.50-$49.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2006
Awards Owen Ashbrook, an account executive with PSA Financial Center, was awarded a certificate for 30 years of service to the industry by the Society of Certified Insurance Counselors. New contract Marshall Management announced that the Salisbury-based hotel management company has received a contract to operate the Kalorama Guest House in Washington. Open Under the Mistletoe, which offers handcrafted jewelry as well as other craft and gift items, has opened at 75B W. Main St. in New Market, Frederick County.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | November 28, 2005
For those who want to forgo the crowded malls and the impersonal Internet for their holiday shopping, the many bazaars that dot the area on fall weekends offer an alternative featuring whimsical crafts, fresh greenery and homemade goodies. "I love stuff like this," said Barbara Steger of Union Bridge, who saw a road sign for the Mistletoe Mart in Carroll County and decided to stop. "You don't need a big shopping center." Bette Brust and Janet Wenk often make a sisters day out of bazaar shopping.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing Writer | November 12, 1992
The 19th annual Mistletoe Mart, a seasonal display of arts and crafts for early Christmas shoppers, opens today at the Church of the Ascension in Westminster.The Mistletoe Mart will be open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. today and tomorrow, and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.Features include a country store, specialty shops and about 40 artists and crafts people from the surrounding area and as far away as Massachusetts, Michigan, Vermont and North Carolina.Shoppers can choose among baskets, decorations, marble works, dried flower arrangements, quilts and German paper-cutting arts.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | December 12, 1999
It was early December, sharp and clear. Fallen leaves carpeted the woods, leaving nearly empty branches etched against a vast blue sky. Looking up, I noticed several balls of fine-leafed shrubbery wrapped around the highest limbs, like fur cuffs on spindly arms. "Mistletoe," my country-born husband remarked, adding, "They harvest it with shotguns." "You're kidding," I replied. He wasn't. From New Jersey to Texas, mistletoe collectors blast the herb of peace and love out of the treetops with deadly weapons.
NEWS
November 6, 2005
TODAY Firehouse breakfast -- New Windsor Fire Company will hold a pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to noon in the fire hall, 101 High St. The cost is $6, and $3 for children. 410-775-7402. Hospice memorial -- Carroll Hospice will hold its annual Remembrance and Sharing Service honoring patients from the past year at 2 p.m. at Meadow Branch Church of the Brethren, 818 Old Taneytown Road. 410-871-8000. TOMORROW Monday music -- McDaniel College will present a free Monday Night Music series at 7 p.m. in McDaniel Lounge.
NEWS
By James Kimberly and James Kimberly,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | December 25, 2002
BRADY, Texas -- This is where Christmas kisses are born, in a stable of all places, and a bespectacled rancher named Robert "Speedy" Tiemann is responsible. Tiemann runs his family's businesses, and for 49 years one of those has been the business of selling fresh mistletoe to people unable or unwilling to pluck it from trees themselves. The mistletoe business is good for the Tiemann family. Tiemann, 59, won't say how good, but he is acknowledged by just about everyone who knows as the primary provider of fresh mistletoe in the United States.
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